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Unscoped Aircheck from 1967

Cordelia Chase

Frequent Participant

I just stumbled across this aircheck from an old station near my hometown on a YouTube channel run by Rockford87. I wasn't listening to the radio in 1967, but I enjoyed hearing the songs, news topics and delivery style from that period and I was hoping some of you all would like it as well. Rockford87's channel has a few more airchecks from other stations also.

(Moderators, please remove this link if I'm wrong in sharing it here. I'm not even sure if this is the proper thread.)
 
Wow, a true MOR styled station with the one spot at a time formula. It was an interesting listen and the jingles worked well for the format. The commercial copy style has sure changed!
 
I like MOR!

WJEJ out of Hagerstown, MD has a similar, but less structured format, with much of the same music, although with more of the "mainstream" songs that true MOR stations didn't play, along with some newer stuff that almost makes it a sort of oldies-heavy soft AC than MOR.

Incidentally, WBCI still exists, albeit with different calls: WMBG - Wikipedia

And if the Wikipedia page is to be believed, they're still playing the same sort of music, even! EDIT: Nah, I'm giving the online stream a listen, and so far, they sound more or less like a standard rock-heavy, late 70s and 80s-centric classic hits station. Oh, well. Wishful thinking that it would've actually been more into the older stuff (back east, there seems to be more support for such old music over the air. Why is that? Or is it just that California, and the SFBA in particular, is pushing newer stuff so hard that almost any station not playing CHR or AC sounds old by comparison?).

c
 
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I just stumbled across this aircheck from an old station near my hometown on a YouTube channel run by Rockford87. I wasn't listening to the radio in 1967, but I enjoyed hearing the songs, news topics and delivery style from that period and I was hoping some of you all would like it as well. Rockford87's channel has a few more airchecks from other stations also.

(Moderators, please remove this link if I'm wrong in sharing it here. I'm not even sure if this is the proper thread.)
I listened to the entire aircheck. Very interesting and quite good. I noted the song by Vic Dana who is 81 years old. I also really enjoyed Barry Young with the Dean Martin sound alike song "One Has My Name (The Other Has My Heart)". I found The Letterman doing the Turtles hit "Happy Together" to be interesting. Sounds to me like they could have played the original Turtles hit as it doesn't rock that hard. The station also seemed to really be into the A&M Records sounds of Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass, The Baja Marimba Band, and Sergio Mendes and Brasil '66.
 
I like MOR!

WJEJ out of Hagerstown, MD has a similar, but less structured format, with much of the same music, although with more of the "mainstream" songs that true MOR stations didn't play, along with some newer stuff that almost makes it a sort of oldies-heavy soft AC than MOR.
I was listening to WJEJ yesterday and heard a great song by Jimmy Buffett I'd never heard before, "Miss You So Badly". Then they went into Les Brown and I shut it off. Their Phone Party segment is ok. I still can't believe they use weather jingles from the 1960s, listening to those is like a time warp.
 
Yeah, they do add in some big band and standards. I like it all, so I can listen to WJEJ almost uninterrupted for hours on end (there's a certain DJ that tends to talk over songs from beginning to end, which I find annoying, but fortunately, being on the west coast and three hours behind, I can listen to their automated overnight programming at a reasonable hour, so the chatty DJ problem isn't much of an issue.

Anyway, back to the aircheck, I like how the announcer tells the listeners the title and artist of every song, so I know what records to look for. Yes, I'm old fashioned, and will actually look for vinyl copies of songs I hear on stations like this, both defunct (as in this one) and extant (As in WJEJ and others), and the reason for this is that, in at least a few cases, the mixes that I hear on the original vinyl are actually BETTER than the so-called remastered ones that are available online.

For example, take Peggy Lee's 1958 hit "Fever". The new, remastered versions (both mono and stereo mixes) sound clinical and flat, with a very wimpy, modern sounding reverb that's laid so far back that it's almost imperceptible, but the original mixes use the lush, full reverb that was common back in the late 50s and 60s, and the mix overall is warmer and more analog sounding, which I like. I lucked out and found an original single copy of the song, in mono, that was in exceptionally good condition, and even with the imperfections (it does have some light scratches and very light, virtually unnoticeable crackle), I think it sounds fantastic compared to all the modern redos. The fact that I have a decent cartridge and needle on my main turntable probably helps, as I have another, more cheaply made turntable that has a lower end cartridge that tends to clip and overload during loud passages quite badly, and as a result it sounds rather dull and lifeless. It's nevertheless good enough for general listening, so I've kept it and I still use it occasionally.

c
 
"Right now, MISTER Bobbie Gentry, Ode to Billie Jo!" Played it back three times, the jock actually thought a guy was singing that song.
I noticed that too.

Her voice is somewhat deep and raspy, and her name is generally considered masculine (especially in 1967, probably), so I can see how the DJ could make that mistake.

c
 
I noticed that too.

Her voice is somewhat deep and raspy, and her name is generally considered masculine (especially in 1967, probably), so I can see how the DJ could make that mistake.

c

That would have required complete ignorance of the lyrics.

Plus...

The record had been NUMBER ONE for a month before the aircheck. She'd been on national TV (The Smothers Brothers) three weeks before the aircheck.

I mean, okay, it's Williamsburg, Virginia on a Saturday evening, but.....as Kelly would say....

Good Lord.
 
Ahhhh.... right! I see!!

I didn't realize that it had been #1 a month before. I thought it was new and had just been released when this aircheck was recorded.

So, in reference to the DJ, I'll third what @Kelly A says, then, because that level of ignorance is kind of profound :rolleyes:

c
 
Ahhhh.... right! I see!!

I didn't realize that it had been #1 a month before. I thought it was new and had just been released when this aircheck was recorded.

So, in reference to the DJ, I'll third what @Kelly A says, then, because that level of ignorance is kind of profound :rolleyes:

c

It hadn’t just been number one a month before.

It was number one for the ENTIRE month leading up to this aircheck. It had just fallen to number two.
 
"Right now, MISTER Bobbie Gentry, Ode to Billie Jo!" Played it back three times, the jock actually thought a guy was singing that song.
I mean, okay, it's Williamsburg, Virginia on a Saturday evening, but.....as Kelly would say....

Good Lord.
Wow, that one slipped by me! The thing is, there was no need for the announcer to even say "Mister!"

The spelling was usually feminized, but older southern women were often given first names that were traditionally men's. These women were generally referred to by both their first and middle names, like Billie Jean, Willie Mae, or Eddie Ruth. And don't forget sisters Billie Jo and Bobbie Jo from the television show "Petticoat Junction!" (These are full names and not nicknames, BTW.)
 
... And don't forget sisters Billie Jo and Bobbie Jo from the television show "Petticoat Junction!" (These are full names and not nicknames, BTW.)
Billie Jo and Bobbie Jo were the two super-hotties on that show when played by Meredith McRae and Lori Saunders. "Betty Jo" (Linda Kaye Henning) was pretty good too. During the one year that "The Beverly Hillbillies" continued on after "Petticoat Junction" got canceled, Lori played "Betty Gordon", one of Mr. Drysdale's secretaries, although she had little to do, or say. She did get to come down the Clampett's ornate staircase wearing a bikini. It was worthwhile to hire her just to do that!
 
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