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Pillar of Fire acquires Max Media Denver

The stations overperfomed revenue-wise because of being the only stations in the market willing to sell advertising to dispensaries. Part of my early work there was ensuring the station's stream blocked out any marijuana spots out of state to stay legal.
excuse my ignorance. I’ve never been to Denver nor know the radio market. So, if the stations over performed revenue wise, why are they selling?
 
excuse my ignorance. I’ve never been to Denver nor know the radio market. So, if the stations over performed revenue wise, why are they selling?
I think Lance is saying "overperformed" in the sense that a low rated station would normally bill in accordance with its audience share. But this one, by taking what everyone else refused, raked in a lot of revenue "above its ratings justification".
 
I think that was the only station risking Federal sanction by running ads for cannabis.
There are quite a few others from smaller owners around the country. I know of a couple in California and on the east coast. But they are purposely keeping the knowledge of them low profile. And I doubt you'll find any of their spots running on streams.
excuse my ignorance. I’ve never been to Denver nor know the radio market. So, if the stations over performed revenue wise, why are they selling?
The owners of Max Media are all in their 70s and 80s. But most importantly, Pillar of Fire made them an unsolicited offer they felt the couldn't refuse.
I think Lance is saying "overperformed" in the sense that a low rated station would normally bill in accordance with its audience share. But this one, by taking what everyone else refused, raked in a lot of revenue "above its ratings justification".
Correct. They carved a unique niche in the market and capitalized on it.
 
There are quite a few others from smaller owners around the country. I know of a couple in California and on the east coast. But they are purposely keeping the knowledge of them low profile. And I doubt you'll find any of their spots running on streams.
I shoulda' said "in the market" which would mean all local pot shops that wanted to sell cannabis instead of just CBD had to buy that station if they bought radio at all.
 
There are quite a few others from smaller owners around the country. I know of a couple in California and on the east coast. But they are purposely keeping the knowledge of them low profile. And I doubt you'll find any of their spots running on streams.

I know of one I can get that takes those spots. It is indeed operated by a smaller owner. I've heard a couple also advertise CBD. My understanding is that CBD is legal, but I've often wondered how many of those businesses advertising CBD are also dispensaries. I also understand one of my local clusters would love to take those ads, but the corporate legal department won’t allow it.

The streams don’t have to follow FCC policies on advertising and are separate from the stations licenses, but I would assume streaming those spots on the internet would run afoul of different federal laws, even if those spots didn’t run across state lines.
 
There are quite a few others from smaller owners around the country. I know of a couple in California and on the east coast. But they are purposely keeping the knowledge of them low profile.
When I visited Humboldt County, California three years ago, I noticed that some of the local stations had marijuana-oriented spots. But they were aimed at growers, not consumers. They kind of reminded me of ag spots I'd hear in the Midwest.
 
Went to Laughlin/Bullhead City recently, and a radio cluster was advertising a dispensary in nearby Needles, CA. So it is happening, just not in any major metros (outside Denver, that I’m aware of).
 
Went to Laughlin/Bullhead City recently, and a radio cluster was advertising a dispensary in nearby Needles, CA. So it is happening, just not in any major metros (outside Denver, that I’m aware of).
In a few months, it won't be happening in Denver, either.

My neighborhood Safeway has coupons on the back of cash-register receipts for a marijuana place. Maybe that's the next frontier for cannabis advertising???
 

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In a few months, it won't be happening in Denver, either.

My neighborhood Safeway has coupons on the back of cash-register receipts for a marijuana place. Maybe that's the next frontier for cannabis advertising???
The ad doesn't even say what "Social" sells. Not even a picture of a leaf or a wisp of smoke. Could a radio ad that doesn't give any indication of the product being sold be safe to run?

Here in Vermont, where recreational marijuana sales started about a year ago, the dispensaries can advertise, in theory. But in practice, they are hamstrung by the state, which has put in place some really high hurdles, including requiring print media to prove that their publications have a readership that is less than 15 percent under 21 years of age. No publisher, of course, has any idea who is reading their paper once it's left the building, but that's the law. As the owner of a pot shop in Montpelier says: "Have you ever met anyone who's under 21? They're not reading the ******* paper."

 
i cant speak officially, but my personal guess is that If it was legal for us to run underwriting in some form from a pot shop in Anchorage, we'd probably accept it. There are some pot dispensary licenses in bush Alaska, but its not legal to carry it on planes.. so they get it there other ways. Plenty of people in our communities grow their own for non commercial personal use which is legal.
 
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Plenty of people in our communities grow their own for non commercial personal use which is legal.

Forgive me, but when you post stories about your area, I hear the theme for Northern Exposure in my head. I've said that to you before. So when you posted this, I did a search for "Northern Exposure marijuana," because I could remember an episode that dealt with it. This is one of the stories that came up in the search:

 
Forgive me, but when you post stories about your area, I hear the theme for Northern Exposure in my head. I've said that to you before. So when you posted this, I did a search for "Northern Exposure marijuana," because I could remember an episode that dealt with it. This is one of the stories that came up in the search:


Well, at one time I had the mayor working for me and one of my volunteers is an EMT/substitute teacher/private pilot/plane mechanic/licensed ham operator/cuts hair (when i ask, if shes not busy)

And i used to joke that i was one of only two people in town who could tell the mayor what to do, the other being his wife.

KSKO is/was the closest real life example to northern exposure that you'll find.

I even have moose come up right to the front steps at KSKO
 
i cant speak officially, but my personal guess is that If it was legal for us to run underwriting in some form from a pot shop in Anchorage, we'd probably accept it. There are some pot dispensary licenses in bush Alaska, but its not legal to carry it on planes.. so they get it there other ways. Plenty of people in our communities grow their own for non commercial personal use which is legal.
All cannabis products sold in Vermont are supposed to stay and be used in Vermont, and transporting them over the New Hampshire line can get you arrested, because recreational cannabis has not been legalized there. But more than half the business of the two shops in White River Junction comes from across the river, and it's back into New Hampshire all that stuff goes once purchased. Obviously, driving while high will get you in trouble in NH, but that's true here, too. But at least in this area, with so many college students around and generally liberal attitudes in most towns, the cops aren't going around opening glove compartments during routine traffic-violation stops just to see if there might be a jar of gummies in there.
 
The ad doesn't even say what "Social" sells. Not even a picture of a leaf or a wisp of smoke. Could a radio ad that doesn't give any indication of the product being sold be safe to run?
The green cross is what's supposed to give it away.

I bet that confuses the heck out of visiting Europeans (esp. French and Spanish), for whom a green cross is the sign for a pharmacy.

The spots on the Max Media stations are not coy at all.

Here in Vermont, where recreational marijuana sales started about a year ago, the dispensaries can advertise, in theory. But in practice, they are hamstrung by the state, which has put in place some really high hurdles, including requiring print media to prove that their publications have a readership that is less than 15 percent under 21 years of age. No publisher, of course, has any idea who is reading their paper once it's left the building, but that's the law. As the owner of a pot shop in Montpelier says: "Have you ever met anyone who's under 21? They're not reading the ******* paper."

I suspect that law wouldn't survive a constitutional challenge.
 
All cannabis products sold in Vermont are supposed to stay and be used in Vermont, and transporting them over the New Hampshire line can get you arrested, because recreational cannabis has not been legalized there. But more than half the business of the two shops in White River Junction comes from across the river, and it's back into New Hampshire all that stuff goes once purchased. Obviously, driving while high will get you in trouble in NH, but that's true here, too. But at least in this area, with so many college students around and generally liberal attitudes in most towns, the cops aren't going around opening glove compartments during routine traffic-violation stops just to see if there might be a jar of gummies in there.
As if state lines ever stopped anyone.

For part of my childhood, I lived about 10 miles from the Iowa-Missouri state line. Fireworks are illegal in all of Iowa; in Missouri, it's local option. Guess what people did?

Iowa had liquor as a state monopoly. Until the late 1960s, every individual liquor purchase was logged. On Highway 5 at the state line, there were two liquor stores. I don't even know if they checked IDs. Guess what people did?
 
hi from Buffalo_ Niagara falls Market 59
As I was waking up today....
I would discover not one... but TWO stations in a major top 20 market that are Full Power FM's went for
" only 3.75 million " ( each) leads me to believe in the near future more
' hobbyists ' or bored rich kids will want a radio station instead of what they would usually get... I'm not a bored rich kid..
However, I am a hobbyist and would like to own a station someday.

and, do they really need two ?
flip 107.1 ( back) to dance fm
think it was the 107/1 frequency that was
edm_ top 40 - remixed - if not,
please provide the correct info
 
As if state lines ever stopped anyone.

For part of my childhood, I lived about 10 miles from the Iowa-Missouri state line. Fireworks are illegal in all of Iowa; in Missouri, it's local option. Guess what people did?

Iowa had liquor as a state monopoly. Until the late 1960s, every individual liquor purchase was logged. On Highway 5 at the state line, there were two liquor stores. I don't even know if they checked IDs. Guess what people did?
Some people in Iowa do the same thing with the dispensary in Milan, Illinois, which is just across the state line.
 
Pillar of Fire has been in the NY radio market for decades, 1930s on AM (now deleted) and 1950s on FM. 99.1 WAWZ's city of license is a small community near New Brunswick NJ, known as Zarephath. It's mentioned in the Bible, now in present day Lebanon. It has a full Class B signal. But with a tower in New Jersey, 30 miles from Midtown, it doesn't cover the whole market.

WAWZ has an unusual operating plan. It is commercially-licensed and runs commercials during its Christian Contemporary format. But the parent company is non-profit and the station also asks for donations.

With Pillar of Fire buying both 107.1 and 101.5 in the Denver market, I'd imagine one frequency will play CCM and the other will simulcast 950 AM's Christian Talk and Teaching schedule. I'm not sure if KPOF 950 is a commercial station or not? The results are almost the same. If it's commercial, then it charges the preachers for the time they buy on the station. If it's non-commercial, then the station runs the programs for "free" but expects the donations that come in to be "shared" between the host and the station.
KPOF is on 910
KKSE-950 in Denver is Altitude Sports Radio
 
Pillar of Fire has been in the NY radio market for decades, 1930s on AM (now deleted) and 1950s on FM. 99.1 WAWZ's city of license is a small community near New Brunswick NJ, known as Zarephath. It's mentioned in the Bible, now in present day Lebanon. It has a full Class B signal. But with a tower in New Jersey, 30 miles from Midtown, it doesn't cover the whole market.

WAWZ has an unusual operating plan. It is commercially-licensed and runs commercials during its Christian Contemporary format. But the parent company is non-profit and the station also asks for donations.

With Pillar of Fire buying both 107.1 and 101.5 in the Denver market, I'd imagine one frequency will play CCM and the other will simulcast 950 AM's Christian Talk and Teaching schedule. I'm not sure if KPOF 950 is a commercial station or not? The results are almost the same. If it's commercial, then it charges the preachers for the time they buy on the station. If it's non-commercial, then the station runs the programs for "free" but expects the donations that come in to be "shared" between the host and the station.

Maybe. Neither of them have full market signals. Even with translators.
And even then, they have near overlapping coverage in some areas of town
 
And even then, they have near overlapping coverage in some areas of town

Gee i wonder why that is, on paper? Theyre both 97,000 Watts, one is at 2047 feet, one is at 2051 feet on the same tower some near 50 miels east of town.
 
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