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Thread: June ratings are here

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by BamaTX View Post
    Radio jobs will soon be a thing of the past.
    Really? Depends on what you mean by "radio jobs." There are radio jobs at Spotify. Or maybe you think the music just appears. There are radio jobs at Pandora, Apple, Sirius, and all the other digital companies. How do I know this? Because I know people who work there. It takes people to make radio, regardless of the platform, and those people will get work. Don't worry about radio jobs.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by BamaTX View Post
    You're just making up so many lameduck excuses to make OTT content seem like too much of a hassle and sacrifice. But the reality is that it's not. Everyone is slowly embracing services like Apple Music, Pandora, and Spotify. I've seen more new cars with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay than I have with HD Radio.

    At the moment, terrestrial radio still holds some value. But that will soon come to an end. It's all downhill from here for FM radio. Companies like iHeart, Entercom, and Univision will have to continue to push their online content. The golden years of radio are behind us. Radio jobs will soon be a thing of the past.
    Radio is and will continue to be healthy.

    Listener preferences totally aside, virtually all streaming services suffer from the same fatal flaw in the car - deficient cellular infrastructure.

    The same crappy cellular networks that drop the call when you're on the phone during rush hour also choke when people are using online services in the car. I sit at stoplights in Sugar Land and marvel that my iPhone can't download an email fully from the server during afternoon drive.

    My wife's Sprint iPhone has no service at all in wide swaths of the 'burbs, including at our house. We actually have to use an internet connected femtocell that Sprint provided us with in our home for her stupid Sprint phone to work at all here. I have one bar on my Verizon phone, and it's usually solid enough, but seriously - one bar? It automatically switches over to "VZW WiFi" in our home in an effort to be semi-reliable.

    And do you know why? NIMBY. People in the 'burbs HATE cellular towers and they'll fight tooth and nail to keep them out of their neighborhoods. They'll then bitch and moan endlessly about having no signal, never putting 2 and 2 together.

    I've been reading this board for what feels like 10 years now, and every year it's the same old thing "Oh, but cellular is coming out with X and it's going to KILL radio!" B.S. Every single year the same thing. Think it will be 5G? Think again. Verizon isn't interested in improving your cell signal. They're interested in competing with Comcast for home based services. Cell phones are an afterthought when it comes to 5G.

    Ever try using mobile data in a smaller city where the wireless providers don't try very hard, and instead all suck equally in that oligopoly way cellular providers do?

    Until the cellular industry gets serious about mobile signal quality AND suburbs get real about the necessity of cell towers, radio has absolutely nothing to fear.

  3. #33
    With gigabytes of storage on my smartphone I can carry plenty of music and podcasts on it if I’m in a poor cellular service area.

    That said, on our summer road trip I listened to radio one time around Memphis and the rest of the time streamed Great Big Radio. No complaints at all, and no commercials. The business of radio is something much different today and with the debt service to carry will continue to be challenged for years.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Really? Depends on what you mean by "radio jobs."
    Traditional radio jobs like the ones we grew up in.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by BamaTX View Post
    Traditional radio jobs like the ones we grew up in.
    You mean where you edit tape with razor blades and jockey discs? Yes, those jobs don't exist any more.

    Today you need to know digital editing, music scheduling software, and social media. Those are the radio jobs now.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by 2Speakers View Post
    Radio is and will continue to be healthy.

    Listener preferences totally aside, virtually all streaming services suffer from the same fatal flaw in the car - deficient cellular infrastructure.
    Outside of Sprint, you'd be hard pressed to find an area where there isn't enough bandwidth to stream audio with Verizon, At&t, or T-Mobile inside the metro area. And even if I hit a deadzone, I have absolutely no problems streaming since entire songs are cached as soon as you start playing them. I usually just drive past deadzones and never notice them because of this

    Sprint's problem is that they have not deployed their spectrum properly (and probably never will). They rely one three 5 MHz carriers to carry their weight. And with so many of their phones not able to do low band and midband CA, this usually means slow data for everyone. They have the spectrum to compete, but not the money to deploy it everywhere.

    As far as 5G, we will eventually see all current LTE spectrum get repurposed to NR. 5G to homes is just something carriers are playing with. The reality is that the mmW spectrum they hope to use for WISP will never work for cellular usage. It's just not practical.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    The term "radio" is used by consumers to signify any audio service without accompanying video. That means OTA, satellite, streaming; your definition is wrong. So as station groups add multiple platforms, all the options available with pure-play steaming will also be offered by traditional radio stations on the newer platforms.

    I have never heard anyone refer to podcasts as "radio". But we are just splitting hairs now.
    As royalties increase, the streaming only services will have to increase the commercials on the free services and increase the cost of paid services. That has the potential of bouncing the ball back to traditional broadcasters with multi-platform delivery.
    I recall the same thing being nsaid about terrestrial radio and royalties.
    The fact is that streaming has not yet found a profitable revenue model. And with royalties increasing, look for an eventual fallout and upheaval in that area.
    We'll probably see consolidations of streaming services, but the option won't go away.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaTX View Post
    I have never heard anyone refer to podcasts as "radio". But we are just splitting hairs now.
    I probably should have said "real time audio without pictures".

    I recall the same thing being nsaid about terrestrial radio and royalties.
    I don't. The royalty structure for terrestrial radio is very different from that which applies to streaming.

    We'll probably see consolidations of streaming services, but the option won't go away.
    And surviving services will need to have higher prices and lots more ads on the free portion of the service... if the free portion is sustainable at all.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
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  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Today you need to know digital editing, music scheduling software, and social media. Those are the radio jobs now.
    Those jobs won't exist the further we go down the road of shifting technology and increased IP based competitors. Traditional FM and AM radio jobs like the ones you mentioned can be completely outsourced or consolidated to a corporate office. You don't need an editor, social media team, or even a program director in every market. You don't even need a studio in the market you service anymore. As radio sees more challenges in the future, the more cost cutting measures it will implement.

    The only thing you will see in the future is a local sales office and that's it.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by BamaTX View Post
    Those jobs won't exist the further we go down the road of shifting technology and increased IP based competitors. Traditional FM and AM radio jobs like the ones you mentioned can be completely outsourced or consolidated to a corporate office. You don't need an editor, social media team, or even a program director in every market. You don't even need a studio in the market you service anymore. As radio sees more challenges in the future, the more cost cutting measures it will implement.

    The only thing you will see in the future is a local sales office and that's it.
    You are talking geography, not logistics. The jobs will remain but they may be centralized in hubs.

    That has been going on for many years at many companies. It's nothing new, and goes back to the 60's when companies had group program directors and a single person responsible for national sales and even a corporate chief engineer.

    What has changed is technology. Programming that came on tape was later delivered by satellite and now comes by FTP or stream or off the cloud.

    It's all changing technology. But it still takes people to do logs, produce spots, select music and all the other tasks.

    Technology and systems change. There was a major change in employment when the FCC eliminated the First Class license requirements for many station functions and then eliminated the license totally. Like this, there have been many changes affecting traffic, billing, studio operations, logging, and more. All have changed employment in some way.

    Nothing new.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, Billboard, Cash Box, R&R, Record World, Music & Media, Audio, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, Popular Electronics, Studio Sound, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

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