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Thread: May ratings

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkW View Post
    Country is a fringe format?
    For the most part yes...off in its own little world, somewhat isolated from mainstream. It gets good numbers because it is a consensus format that markets itself well. But when a country artist gets a pop hit, they can feel the difference.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Let's say it has limited potential right now. How's that for being diplomatic? Hot AC is CHR without the hard stuff. Or it's a younger version of AC. It's a "'tweener" format at a time when the new music isn't very exciting. When CHR is broadening it's view, there are fewer options for Hot AC. Which means the fringe formats like country benefit. Or HUR goes down.
    As those who are actually in the market and listen to the station know, the drop is more likely because of the morning show change.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by AQH View Post
    As those who are actually in the market and listen to the station know, the drop is more likely because of the morning show change.
    I wasn't talking about the specific station, but the format.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    I wasn't talking about the specific station, but the format.
    I wouldn't say country is a "fringe" format. Not with Pink, Gwen Stefani, Sheryl Crow and Kid Rock in it. And when you get too many pop elements in it, guess what? It's no longer country music, but pop with fiddles.

    And if it's fringes you're looking for, why isn't anyone playing Orville Peck? He's one of the hottest up and coming country acts of this year (Google him.) But why isn't country radio playing him?

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  5. #15
    Probably because most country stations don't regularly get service from Sub Pop.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Bongwater View Post
    I wouldn't say country is a "fringe" format. Not with Pink, Gwen Stefani, Sheryl Crow and Kid Rock in it. And when you get too many pop elements in it, guess what? It's no longer country music, but pop with fiddles.
    First of all, Gwen Stefani has never released a country song. She is simply Blake Shelton's girlfriend. That has no effect on music. Pink recorded a duet with Kenny Chesney, but it was Kenny's song. Sheryl Crow has done a few duets, and she's released a country album, but it got no radio airplay. Kid Rock had one hit. One song doesn't define a genre. Blake Shelton understands that country is a fringe format. Some people know his music, but everyone knows Gwen Stefani.

    But you're making musicological decisions based on people, not music. That's the same process that kept Gram Parsons from getting accepted in country music. The Byrds released Sweetheart of the Rodeo 50 years ago. It was a country record, but got no country airplay, and they got boo'd off the Ryman stage. The reason was because they had long hair. It took Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson to break the long hair rule. Then Waylon recorded songs by The Marshall Tucker, Conway Twitty record songs by The Eagles and Pointer Sisters, and they became country hits hits. None of them had fiddles in them. If Orville Peck wants a country hit, he should sing with George Strait.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    First of all, Gwen Stefani has never released a country song. She is simply Blake Shelton's girlfriend. That has no effect on music. Pink recorded a duet with Kenny Chesney, but it was Kenny's song. Sheryl Crow has done a few duets, and she's released a country album, but it got no radio airplay. Kid Rock had one hit. One song doesn't define a genre. Blake Shelton understands that country is a fringe format. Some people know his music, but everyone knows Gwen Stefani.

    But you're making musicological decisions based on people, not music. That's the same process that kept Gram Parsons from getting accepted in country music. The Byrds released Sweetheart of the Rodeo 50 years ago. It was a country record, but got no country airplay, and they got boo'd off the Ryman stage. The reason was because they had long hair. It took Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson to break the long hair rule. Then Waylon recorded songs by The Marshall Tucker, Conway Twitty record songs by The Eagles and Pointer Sisters, and they became country hits hits. None of them had fiddles in them. If Orville Peck wants a country hit, he should sing with George Strait.
    I was going to mention, as an example, the Rolling Stones song from 1977-79(I think that's when it was)but I can't figure out what it was. It was definitely Country but probably didn't do well there because it was The Rolling Stones.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by semoochie View Post
    I was going to mention, as an example, the Rolling Stones song from 1977-79(I think that's when it was)but I can't figure out what it was. It was definitely Country but probably didn't do well there because it was The Rolling Stones.
    You're probably thinking of Wild Horses. That was actually in 1971. Absolutely. Or even Bob Dylan's Lay Lady Lay. He went to Nashville, recorded three entire albums there using Nashville musicians, and still couldn't get a country hit. But by being there, he attracted a lot of other musicians, including Neil Young, James Taylor, and Linda Ronstadt, who started using Nashville musicians and recording songs that introduced their audiences to country music.

  9. #19

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    I thought he was referring to "Far Away Eyes" from 1978. The Some Girls LP. That's a country song.....

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Roddybob View Post
    I thought he was referring to "Far Away Eyes" from 1978. The Some Girls LP. That's a country song.....
    You could be right. Ronnie Wood plays pedal steel on that one. Keith Richard is a big country fan. He recorded with George Jones. I mentioned Wild Horses because it was inspired by Gram Parsons. Johnny Cash once recorded No Expectations. Lots of examples.

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