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Thread: Pa rock radio

  1. #1

    Pa rock radio

    Do you think Rock is what radio listeners want in PA. WZZO WDVE WMMR WMGK and WRVV are all very dominant in their respective markets

  2. #2
    People want lots of things. Rock, of various stripes, is one.

  3. #3
    Rock does well in markets with older populations and Pennsylvania is full of them. In fact, the state average population is 40, compared to the national average of 37. Pennsylvania is also nearly 78 percent non-Hispanic white, compared to about 62 percent for the nation as a whole, another good indicator for rock, which has historically underperformed in all other demos.

  4. #4
    I think that's far from too much, considering there are more than 100 signals catering to the black and Hispanic audience in PA. The white listener is far less discriminatory when it comes to music, example being, over 50 percent of white music lovers will embrace and listen to black and Hispanic formats but less than 2 percent of the black and Hispanic audiance would ever tune into any Rock formats, maybe an Alternative on occasion. No matter how you debunk this its true facts, this is what hurts Rocks radio ratings..

  5. #5
    So....where does that random stat come from? (Was it obtained before or after Gunsmoke was on the air? The show with the eyeconic lawman?)

    Oh, and if something is debunked that by definition means it isn’t a true fact.

  6. #6
    Based on my time in PA, I'd say it's two very different states: The big cities on either side love classic rock. The farm country in the middle loves country music. When I used to go out to State College I'd see more cows per square mile than people. So yes, rock is big in some parts, but not in the country. I remember a lot of country music in Gettysburg, Harrisburg, and Hershey. It's also big in Scranton/Wilks-Barre.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by barefoot View Post
    I think that's far from too much, considering there are more than 100 signals catering to the black and Hispanic audience in PA. The white listener is far less discriminatory when it comes to music, example being, over 50 percent of white music lovers will embrace and listen to black and Hispanic formats but less than 2 percent of the black and Hispanic audiance would ever tune into any Rock formats, maybe an Alternative on occasion. No matter how you debunk this its true facts, this is what hurts Rocks radio ratings..
    The term "Hispanic format" has always been used exclusively for stations broadcasting in Spanish. Non-Hispanic whites don't listen to those stations.

    Black music crosses all manner of foundries. It is liked by groups of people around the world and by many different ethnicity and races in the US, too.

    On the other hand, much rock music has a harder time crossing over from the white male demographic to broad groups that are not in that core.

    And when you look at specific areas, such as Pennsylvania or individual markets in PA, you see that out of 100 total shares of audience, generally well below 10 of them go to rock stations today. And if you look at the under-35 demos, the number shrinks to something closer to 5%.

    Rock is far less a part of CHR, and, of course, Hot AC and AC. It's pretty much among Classic Rock and, to some extent, Classic Hits where rock music, or some of it, still hangs on among older listeners. Alternative shares are not growing, as that is such a fragmented segment most partisans listen via streaming and not to OTA radio.

    And as Mr. Simpson asked, where are the stats you quote to be found?
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  8. #8
    Black music crosses all manner of foundries. It is liked by groups of people around the world and by many different ethnicity and races in the US, too.
    On the other hand, much rock music has a harder time crossing over from the white male demographic to broad groups that are not in that core. Exactly what I was implying...

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by barefoot View Post
    Black music crosses all manner of foundries. It is liked by groups of people around the world and by many different ethnicity and races in the US, too.
    On the other hand, much rock music has a harder time crossing over from the white male demographic to broad groups that are not in that core. Exactly what I was implying...
    Part of the reason may be that much early rock 'n' roll was little more than a way for record labels to make black rhythm and blues "palatable" to white listeners, especially in the South, where Top 40 stations reluctant to play Little Richard or Chuck Berry would feel comfortable playing Elvis Presley or Jerry Lee Lewis instead.

    As for rock's later struggles, those were largely brought on by its steady drift away from its R&B roots. Art-rock bands like Yes and folk-rock bands like the Byrds played music with far more emphasis on melody than beat. In the case of Yes and similar bands, the end product often bore a greatr resemblance to European-born classical music than anything that ever came from African American culture or Africa itself. Virtuoso solos on the electric guitar likewise would have little appeal to listeners used to the interplay of percussion instruments.

  10. #10
    "less than 2 percent of the black and Hispanic audiance would ever tune into any Rock formats" isn't implying, it's presenting a number as if it's based on something tangible.

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