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Thread: Mountain Makes It 3 In A Row!

  1. #31
    This is the time of year when country shares tend to go up. Just one year ago, KNIX spent the entire summer in the upper 5s, and sitting comfortably in the Top 5. They're likely to go there again this summer. As pointed out earlier, KMLE is in a rebuilding phase right now. I remember a time not long ago when the rumor was the entire CBS cluster was on the block. That never happened, and now Entercom seems pretty happy with what they've got. The music right now has no explosive core as it did 5 years ago. There's a new generation building steam, and they should see dividends soon. It's a currents-based music, so it goes in cycles. Just wait a few months, and we'll see what happens.

  2. #32
    Question: who needed crossover with Garth Brooks and other country artists of that era (Alan Jackson and Clint Black also come to mind), when the music format itself had become more popular?

    I recall country music itself expanded its audience, with magazines like Newsweek and Time having articles about artists like Garth selling out stadiums, and they referred to it as a phenomenon.

    Country has had several periods (two of which I can recall) where the music format itself expanded and gained former pop and rock fans -- the Urban Cowboy era of the early 80's, and the 90's Garth - Shania era. Shania even played at a Super Bowl. That's how big the music was at the time.

    As for 100 million records, I would think that the multiple copy thing also would have applied to other high selling artists of that decade, regardless of format.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by boombox4 View Post
    Question: who needed crossover with Garth Brooks and other country artists of that era (Alan Jackson and Clint Black also come to mind), when the music format itself had become more popular?
    That's a really good point, at least for the first half of the decade. Unquestionably, Garth and his crew brought more listeners to the format than Willie & Merle. The popularity of these artists caused a large number of radio stations to flip formats to country music. So instead of country artists seeking airplay on other formats, there were a number of radio stations changing formats to country. This was a big thing in the early 90s. One of those stations that flipped to country during this time was KMLE. At the time, KMLE was owned by Shamrock, and that company owned several country stations including KZLA in LA. KNIX was #1 in Phoenix, so it was an obvious target. And thus began the competition between KMLE and KNIX. Thanks to Garth Brooks!

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    This was a big thing in the early 90s. One of those stations that flipped to country during this time was KMLE. At the time, KMLE was owned by Shamrock, and that company owned several country stations including KZLA in LA. KNIX was #1 in Phoenix, so it was an obvious target. And thus began the competition between KMLE and KNIX. Thanks to Garth Brooks!
    KMLE was a religious station and the format flipped to country when Shamrock bought it in August of 1988. They came prepared to challenge KNIX as the country station for a younger generation of listeners. IIRC the first morning team was Taylor & The Bear, who offered a more uptempo and contemporary sound than W. Steven Martin at KNIX. Then came Garth Brooks and other new artists who quickly dethroned the old guard of country music.
    Dr. Akbar 'n Nurse Jeff
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    Now in our 19th year of posting totally irrelevant comments. Someone had to do it!

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAkbar View Post
    Then came Garth Brooks and other new artists who quickly dethroned the old guard of country music.
    Exactly correct. The year 1988 is also the year that a lot of heritage country artists such as George Jones, Willie Nelson, and Merle Haggard lost their record contracts, and those older acts were replaced by something that became known at "hot new country." That was the driving force for radio ratings, record sales, and popular culture. Garth was part of something called the "Class of 89," which included Clint Black, Travis Tritt, and Alan Jackson.

    Right now the music appears to be at a bit of a crossroads. There is a new generation coming into the music right now. If they take hold and attract a lot of attention outside of the format, it could draw new listeners to country radio again.

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