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Thread: Mighty 1090 Leaves The Air

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    93.7 is very tightly limited by same channel, adjacent channel and second adjacent protections.

    And a translator can not be used to extend the 60 dbu of a station, only to fill in deficiencies.
    Take a look at the applications KWFN filed a few months ago to install a network of synchronized boosters across North County - five of them in a neat row from Encinitas across to Ramona.

    They're designed to push 60 dBu right out to the edge of the main signal's predicted 60, which is terrain blocked going north (but which is otherwise a pretty decent class B from the Emerald Hills KOGO site.)

    Similar "synchrocast" systems are working pretty well in other markets such as Boston (WXRV and WXLO). The technology has advanced considerably in the last few years.
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  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by fybush View Post
    Take a look at the applications KWFN filed a few months ago to install a network of synchronized boosters across North County - five of them in a neat row from Encinitas across to Ramona.

    They're designed to push 60 dBu right out to the edge of the main signal's predicted 60, which is terrain blocked going north (but which is otherwise a pretty decent class B from the Emerald Hills KOGO site.)

    Similar "synchrocast" systems are working pretty well in other markets such as Boston (WXRV and WXLO). The technology has advanced considerably in the last few years.
    I agree that boosters can be a partial solution, but the suggestion was "translators" which can't be used in many if not most of the North County areas of San Diego as the theoretical unobstructed 60 dbu of 97.3 does not appear to reach Carlsbad/Oceanside/Vista and, of course, the areas to the East that we might call the "Fallbrook Mini Metro".

    About the only place a booster or translator could be effective would be the San Marcos area.

    The terrain and the poor coverage by most of the SD stations is the reason we used to have a separate North County Arbitron book. But as the population move north and east, that sort of became a moot point. And the stations of significance licensed "up there" moved south, effectively eliminating an Arbitron subscriber base there.

    Boosters likely can improve areas that appear on maps to have a signal but don't due to terrain (I'm quite intimately aware of the problems that KLNV has had in that region... another one at that site), but they won't help at the top of the county where there is a rather substantial and growing population.
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  3. #13
    Ah, but KWFN is a class B - and class Bs are protected to 54 dBu and thus can put boosters within their 54, so long as the booster 54 doesn't exceed the predicted main 54.

    Entercom wouldn't have filed for these (and had them accepted for filing) if they didn't think they could have been granted. They're in the FCC records as KWFN-FM-1, KWFN-2, KWFN-3, KWFN-4 and KWFN-5.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by fybush View Post
    Ah, but KWFN is a class B - and class Bs are protected to 54 dBu and thus can put boosters within their 54, so long as the booster 54 doesn't exceed the predicted main 54.

    Entercom wouldn't have filed for these (and had them accepted for filing) if they didn't think they could have been granted. They're in the FCC records as KWFN-FM-1, KWFN-2, KWFN-3, KWFN-4 and KWFN-5.
    Ah, I forgot about the 54 dbu on B's. That would just barely put the boosters in those populous North County communities to the NW, but would not help to the NE.
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  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    Ah, I forgot about the 54 dbu on B's. That would just barely put the boosters in those populous North County communities to the NW, but would not help to the NE.
    The KWFN 54 gets to Ramona (but not to Julian).

    Again, there's no way John Kennedy and the Entercom engineering braintrust would have filed for a Ramona booster if they didn't know they could get a Ramona booster. They know their stuff. And Bert Goldman, who did the filings for them, has been the engineering mind behind all these synchrocast boosters.

    Let's see if the Ramona engineering filing makes it through this link...

    https://licensing.fcc.gov/cdbs/CDBS_...um=1&exhcnum=1
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  6. #16
    The bigger mystery, really, is why KWFN and KLNV stayed in Emerald Hills as North County's population boomed. The spacing issues aren't that daunting. KWFN is way more than fully spaced to KWIZ, KCAL-FM and KAMP. It's exactly fully spaced to KLYY under 73.207, but 73.215 short-spacing would buy up to another 23 km of proximity to KLYY, and you wouldn't need anywhere near that much to move it to Soledad with a DA. KLNV's spacing situation is even better. From Soledad, it would be fully spaced to KALI and KROQ, and just a couple of km short to (of all things) KIXA-FM in Lucerne Valley, but 73.215 contour protection would solve that even without a DA. Or rather, it would have been fully spaced if CC hadn't moved 95.7 to Soledad first. Once 95.7 moved to Soledad, IF spacing made it impossible for KLNV to go there. But it still could have gone on the KGB tower.
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by fybush View Post
    The KWFN 54 gets to Ramona (but not to Julian).

    Again, there's no way John Kennedy and the Entercom engineering braintrust would have filed for a Ramona booster if they didn't know they could get a Ramona booster. They know their stuff. And Bert Goldman, who did the filings for them, has been the engineering mind behind all these synchrocast boosters.

    Let's see if the Ramona engineering filing makes it through this link...

    https://licensing.fcc.gov/cdbs/CDBS_...um=1&exhcnum=1
    Those are pretty clever designs. If you look at a terrain map, the patterns fit the shadowed valley areas and look like they will not "overflow" and interfere with the main signal or any of the other boosters. They are taking advantage of the ability of the terrain itself to shield the signals, as most of the populated areas are not on hilltops but deep in the valley areas... Vista being a good example.

    I'm guessing that the ability to rent on cellular towers made this possible. To build new towers in a high-NIMBY zone would have been difficult.

    More interesting is the fact that Entercom is obviously spending significant money on this project, kind of a novelty today.
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  8. #18
    I'd expect the Padres have had something to say about it - I'm sure they would like to have those valleys back within their reach.
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  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by fybush View Post
    I'd expect the Padres have had something to say about it - I'm sure they would like to have those valleys back within their reach.
    I believe that is probably the case too. As someone who travels every other weekend to the North County (particularly Carlsbad, Vista and Fallbrook) from Phoenix, I can attest to the signal limitations of 97.3 in the valley areas, and my car has a pretty good FM radio. The HD radio signal aspect of KWFN is nice when it locks, but because of the various hills and valleys in the north county, it comes in and out. I think the network of boosters should work fine, but I wonder if the HD signal of the main transmitter will override the booster signals? This phenomenon occurs in various forms across the country, the most recognizable for me is driving up the I-17 to Flagstaff from Phoenix when the 93.3 HD signal from KDKB Phoenix cuts in and overpowers the analog signal of K227AP from Cottonwood (a translator of KVNA 100.1 FM from Flagstaff). You can literally have two different radio stations on the same channel come in, one on analog and one on HD. If the timing is right, it won’t be a problem with KWFN and their network of boosters.

    Any idea when the KWFN north county boosters might be turned on?

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