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Thread: Oldies Fans what about Shortwave?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by CTListener View Post
    Only the ones run by the government, I believe. Besides, a station that programs preaching and music can always say it's doing so to reach overseas listeners. How could the FCC prove that it isn't, since there are fans of oldies and people receptive to a Christian message all over the world?

    Actually, wrong.

    Directly from the mouth of a shortwave radio station owner to me:



    What the rules say is that we can't broadcast a program intended exclusively for a continental US audience. So I think you could say that it is legal for us to broadcast to the US, but not exclusively to the US. As a practical matter though, the FCC does not allow us to list US zones in our official target areas. We have to beam to ITU target zones (what are called CIRAF zones) that are outside the United States.

  2. #12

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    The gov't KNOWS what frequencies they're on. As I understand it, SW broadcasters pay a Frequency Usage Fee for every frequency they're on. That's what I picked up from Allan Weiner (WBCQ 7490) during his program Allan Weiner Worldwide.
    I think the FCC is more focused on keeping interference to a minimum between broadcasters and the military and others with whom they share some bands.
    Although I ocassionally hear OTH radar on top of commercial SW broadcasters who have been on those frequencies for years.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by kf4rca View Post
    The gov't KNOWS what frequencies they're on. As I understand it, SW broadcasters pay a Frequency Usage Fee for every frequency they're on. That's what I picked up from Allan Weiner (WBCQ 7490) during his program Allan Weiner Worldwide.
    I think the FCC is more focused on keeping interference to a minimum between broadcasters and the military and others with whom they share some bands.
    Although I ocassionally hear OTH radar on top of commercial SW broadcasters who have been on those frequencies for years.
    The notorious "Russian Woodpecker"? I thought that thing shut down after the Soviet Union dissolved.

  4. #14
    The Russian Woodpecker is actually located near the old Chernobyl nuclear site. It's in the danger zone and has been pretty much abandoned since the fire at the nuclear plant many years ago. There are lots of video and pictures of the site on the internet. It's huge

  5. #15

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    Modern OTH does not sound like the Russian Woodpecker. Its a more rapid pulse train lasting for 3 seconds or so. And then silence. It may even be from domestic military sources.
    For you oldies fans out there. The mighty KBC has a Saturday night oldies show from 8-10PM (ET) on 5960. (They may be shifting to their summer frequency of 9925 soon.)
    They play mainly 60's rock and roll with many jingles and sounders. Mostly European and American artists with some classic Motown in there as well. The jocks are former Euro-pirate announcers. The commercials are mostly in English but I have heard one Dutch spot in there.
    They broadcast from Nauen, Germany with 125KW power. So they get into the Eastern US quite easily.
    Believe the transmitter is a Telefunken model.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by CTListener View Post
    Well, old rock 'n' roll certainly reflects the culture of the United States, at least as of 40 to 60 years ago, but does evangelical preaching? Or is anything even loosely tied to Christianity protected from this statute?
    I'm always reminded of Aimee Semple McPherson.

  7. #17
    Occasionally I have listened to WTWW's signal, and like the fact that the station plays more than the usual preaching. I have fond memories of WRNO, superpower KUSW, and KYOI (Saipan) playing pop/rock on short wave. Radio Luxembourg's services on 6090 and 15350 were others I enjoyed as well.

    Over the past few years, some countries have altered their rules, or at least have allowed lower powered short wave broadcasters to broadcast. Germany has a few, and Denmark has one, and Australia has a few domestic broadcasters. These tend to be community or non commercial type radio stations that play oldies or pop/rock music. Some stream online, and those that don't can be heard on remote receivers that are nearby. Have any of you listened to these?

    I could see something similar to that taking place here. It would have to be more of a hobby/labor of love/community style radio station. Face it: Short wave listeners tend to be a different breed of people than AM/FM listeners, and there are fewer of us these days. It was Joe Costello of WRNO who challenged the rules regarding domestic/international broadcasting and got his station on the air. A low power SW service would be novel here. Call it "propagation research" and use digital modes like DRM or other modes that may be created. Just an idea.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by SomeRadioGuy View Post
    Actually, wrong.

    Directly from the mouth of a shortwave radio station owner to me:



    What the rules say is that we can't broadcast a program intended exclusively for a continental US audience. So I think you could say that it is legal for us to broadcast to the US, but not exclusively to the US. As a practical matter though, the FCC does not allow us to list US zones in our official target areas. We have to beam to ITU target zones (what are called CIRAF zones) that are outside the United States.
    Global oldies radio. Go figure. Let The Good Times Roll, baby!
    No irony there.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Silkie View Post
    Global oldies radio. Go figure. Let The Good Times Roll, baby!
    Sounds good to me!!!!
    If it comes to a vote....I go with "YES!"

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by spiritof67 View Post
    It was Joe Costello of WRNO who challenged the rules regarding domestic/international broadcasting and got his station on the air.
    The problem is that Joe could not challenge the way broadcast advertising is purchased. There was simply no infrastructure for the buying of international advertising. For example, Coca-Cola has an ad agency or agency affiliate in every country of Latin America, and each has a local budget. There was no multinational budget.

    There was no way to support WRNO's shortwave station via advertising.

    A low power SW service would be novel here. Call it "propagation research" and use digital modes like DRM or other modes that may be created. Just an idea.
    I owned a low power SW station in the late 60's. It was on with 250 watts when I bought it and its 590 kHz AM sister station with the intent of moving the AM to a larger city. I shut the SW down and turned in the license, as even then... a half-century ago... I saw no future in shortwave listening as radios with sw were getting scarcer and scarcer since the trend was towards AM and FM, not AM and SW receivers.
    Last edited by DavidEduardo; 04-17-2019 at 04:58 PM.
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