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Thread: Waiting to see - WABC, WNBM and W232AL-FM.

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    The ITU now says that 15 mV/m is the minimum needed AM signal to cover an urbanized area. Under that standard, the coverage of WABC is not that significantly greater than that of an ESB FM signal.

    Night skywave is irrelevant. Very little radio listening happens then, and nearly no buying takes place. And nearly no listening to out of market AM stations at night can be seen anywhere in the USA.
    I am probably one of the few that listens to AM stations out of my area at night [WCBS, CFZM, etc.] Even ordered something from a WCBS advertiser once so buying does take place. Granted, probably no one under 50 listens to out of market AM stations at night but if they follow a certain sports team that is broadcast on that AM station and that doesn't have an affiliate in where they live, they might try and tune it in [if they even remember that AM still exists.]

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Yabadabado1 View Post
    I am probably one of the few that listens to AM stations out of my area at night [WCBS, CFZM, etc.] Even ordered something from a WCBS advertiser once so buying does take place. Granted, probably no one under 50 listens to out of market AM stations at night but if they follow a certain sports team that is broadcast on that AM station and that doesn't have an affiliate in where they live, they might try and tune it in [if they even remember that AM still exists.]
    One person listening and patronizing one advertiser once -- that would seem to confirm David's "nearly no" statements on both listening and buying, no? The bottom line is that while many of us radio fans found long-distance AM reception fascinating from our youth right into adulthood, that fascination hasn't been mainstream in the US since the very early days of radio broadcasting. I'm pretty sure none of the middle-school kids I knew back in 1968 in suburban Boston were listening to anything but WRKO or WMEX on AM, not staying up late to check out CKLW and WKBW, let alone listening to baseball on WBAL or WJR when the Red Sox were playing on WHDH.

  3. #53
    WABC has become unlistanable most of the day.

  4. #54
    Makes some sense as ESPN radio used to come out of the 17th floor.

  5. #55
    I would like to see Cumulus sell them off and exit New York City radio.

  6. #56

    Join Date
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    If you grew up in a rural area, channel surfing to hear the hits was more necessary (we lost CKLW at sundown pattern change). So off it was to WLS and others.


    Quote Originally Posted by CTListener View Post
    One person listening and patronizing one advertiser once -- that would seem to confirm David's "nearly no" statements on both listening and buying, no? The bottom line is that while many of us radio fans found long-distance AM reception fascinating from our youth right into adulthood, that fascination hasn't been mainstream in the US since the very early days of radio broadcasting. I'm pretty sure none of the middle-school kids I knew back in 1968 in suburban Boston were listening to anything but WRKO or WMEX on AM, not staying up late to check out CKLW and WKBW, let alone listening to baseball on WBAL or WJR when the Red Sox were playing on WHDH.

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