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Thread: It is time to ask the question

  1. #31
    Bottom line here is Tribune Media is a television station operator, which happens to own one AM station. Most television operators have gotten completely out of radio. So the list of potential acquirers of Tribune Media who would also want WGN-AM in the long-term are extraordinarily limited.

    Even if WGN-AM was making lots of money (and it might be), I don't think that changes the strategy. Maybe it would be more attractive for someone like Nexstar to keep if there were a cluster to surround WGN-AM.
    "Its music what makes a radio station, and at Live FM, we play the last music around."
    After receiving that copy, I quit the VO industry.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by staggmovie View Post
    He is, in fact he is the only WGN Radio show host that show even cracks into the top ten any time of the day. Mid mornings/ mid day all the top ten stations are music stations. I have seen people complain about him, that is for sure, but I am sure the only reason that he cracks into the top ten because he has a contest that they mention that happens at 7:20 in the morning.
    Yet, still, the station is not in the top 20 in sales demos. The 12+ does not matter. Agencies donít look at it and most of us in radio ignore 12+ in our own markets.
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  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    Yet, still, the station is not in the top 20 in sales demos. The 12+ does not matter. Agencies don’t look at it and most of us in radio ignore 12+ in our own markets.
    And yet they still billed over $25M in 2016 (I haven't found any figures for last year yet). Granted, that's over 40% down from WBBM, but it's still a nice chunk of change, even for Chicago.
    We have to save the Earth! It's the only planet with football and beer.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by KeithE4 View Post
    And yet they still billed over $25M in 2016 (I haven't found any figures for last year yet). Granted, that's over 40% down from WBBM, but it's still a nice chunk of change, even for Chicago.
    In the early 2000's, WGN was billing nearly $50 million. This year should see them just under $20 million.

    While some of the revenue loss is from the loss of the Cubs, the station is gradually losing tradition-based buys because it is not even a good match for 36-64 campaigns, as few as there may be of them.

    And it is a really expensive station to run. It just might be a case of a station selling for less than one times the gross billing.

    I would not take it if you gave it to me. The profitable options for an AM are already taken, so there is not a very bright future.
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  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    In the early 2000's, WGN was billing nearly $50 million. This year should see them just under $20 million.

    While some of the revenue loss is from the loss of the Cubs, the station is gradually losing tradition-based buys because it is not even a good match for 36-64 campaigns, as few as there may be of them.

    And it is a really expensive station to run. It just might be a case of a station selling for less than one times the gross billing.

    I would not take it if you gave it to me. The profitable options for an AM are already taken, so there is not a very bright future.

    They lost out of the Cubs, but they won the Chicago White Sox, either case WGN Radio has had a losing baseball team on its station since the 2009 season, that is when the Cubs started to lose again, and when they switched over to CBS radio they started winning again. And in 2016 they won the World Series, was WGN Radio their only so called curse? In the meantime WGN Radio went without a baseball team for the years of 2015-2017. While the Score did not go without a baseball team, for not even a full year. But still please correct me if I am wrong but didn't the Cubs wanted to leave WGN Radio?

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post



    Nobody cares. Way back when Gary Owens announced "Live from Beautiful Downtown Burbank" (as did the Johnny Carson show), programmers knew that local was meaningless if the show was entertaining... which is why they picked a city which is neither beautiful nor has a real downtown so they could poke fun at "localism".
    They must not since his show still gets even better ratings then most of the local shows in Chicago, that will ever be the day if he beats the Mix or even WBBM

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    In the early 2000's, WGN was billing nearly $50 million. This year should see them just under $20 million.

    While some of the revenue loss is from the loss of the Cubs, the station is gradually losing tradition-based buys because it is not even a good match for 36-64 campaigns, as few as there may be of them.

    And it is a really expensive station to run. It just might be a case of a station selling for less than one times the gross billing.
    The land the tower sits on is worth at least 5 times what WGN billed in 2016. With WBBM soon to be piggybacked onto WSCR's tower, I wonder what that land sold for, if it already has.

    I would not take it if you gave it to me. The profitable options for an AM are already taken, so there is not a very bright future.
    Outside of sports, there's not much anyone could do with WGN. Its best days are long behind it, and its core audience has died off for the most part (see also: WLS).
    We have to save the Earth! It's the only planet with football and beer.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by staggmovie View Post
    They lost out of the Cubs, but they won the Chicago White Sox, either case WGN Radio has had a losing baseball team on its station since the 2009 season, that is when the Cubs started to lose again, and when they switched over to CBS radio they started winning again. And in 2016 they won the World Series, was WGN Radio their only so called curse? In the meantime WGN Radio went without a baseball team for the years of 2015-2017. While the Score did not go without a baseball team, for not even a full year. But still please correct me if I am wrong but didn't the Cubs wanted to leave WGN Radio?
    Once the team was no longer part of the Tribune "empire" (2009) they were free to negotiate with all stations that wanted to bid. After 27 years, and with a new-found freedom from media ownership, things changed.

    Radio revenue from teams has more to do with long term interest in baseball in the market and team partisanship than with "winning" or "losing" seasons. Negotiations for the upcoming season are based to an extent on previous season audience levels, but just as there is the intangible "feel" of having stadium naming rights, there is a certain sponsor image and pride factor in being a team sponsor. And most sponsorship deals now include multiple media platforms, such as radio, TV, new media, signage, etc.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
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  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post

    Once the team was no longer part of the Tribune "empire" (2009) they were free to negotiate with all stations that wanted to bid. After 27 years, and with a new-found freedom from media ownership, things changed

    I've studied a number of similar "empires" where you had media and other attractions together, and one thing fed the other. Certainly another very similar example was TBS and the Atlanta Braves. In both cases, you had "Super Stations" that brought those baseball teams to larger parts of the country. That was very effective in its day, but as the MLB has grown, those national teams have become less of a factor. Now the marketing of the MLB is more important than the individual teams. MLB owns a lot of the online business and that gives local owners less independence in what they do.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    Once the team was no longer part of the Tribune "empire" (2009) they were free to negotiate with all stations that wanted to bid. After 27 years, and with a new-found freedom from media ownership, things changed.

    Radio revenue from teams has more to do with long term interest in baseball in the market and team partisanship than with "winning" or "losing" seasons. Negotiations for the upcoming season are based to an extent on previous season audience levels, but just as there is the intangible "feel" of having stadium naming rights, there is a certain sponsor image and pride factor in being a team sponsor. And most sponsorship deals now include multiple media platforms, such as radio, TV, new media, signage, etc.
    What you said, plus: All the professional sports teams are all focusing on subscription streaming revenue of the broadcast rights, unlike their only prior options of just negotiating Radio and TV rights. MLB, NHL, and the NBA are all trying various PPV and streamed audio options. These days if a radio station wants to bid on broadcast rights for the local professional sports team, there will ultimately be the requirement at least a three year term and a hefty escalator in years two and three, with much smaller number of avails in the game. Things like playoff coverage rights may be at a premium too.

    Unless the parent company also owns the radio station, professional sports on radio is a very expensive programming option.

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