Beautiful Music Format would work now... - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Beautiful Music Format would work now...

  1. #11
    Moderator/Co-Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    37,845
    Quote Originally Posted by Stress View Post
    No--now it becomes a game of semantics and definitions. B/EZ 60s-80s where there were lots of Lex DeAzevedo and John Fox and Roy Conniff and George Shearing, etc. Not Cyndi Lauper and Milli Vanillia--Sinatra and Carpenter. Soft AC and the Breeze have a different feel due to lack of orchestrations and reliance on vocal hits to fill out the entire schedule.
    By the 80's, Beautiful Music was not Ray Conniff and Shearing and the others you mention. It was not Sinatra, either. It was far more contemporary with Richard Clayderman, Jean Paul Borelli, Francis Goya, Caravelli and Paul Mauriat and loads of custom music. And, whether the 70's or the 80's, vocals were generally one song out of a four to five song set and were selected for mood and flow more than anything else.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, Billboard, Cash Box, R&R, Record World, Music & Media, Audio, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, Popular Electronics, Studio Sound, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Bellingham WA
    Posts
    6,092
    A couple of things:

    B/EZ does live. But it's gone underground, on the blogosphere and Facebook communities. But appreciated by a rebellious younger national hipster audience that was born around the time this music began disappearing off the radio. Who want dangerous, sinful music that is absolutely everything the Establishment hates in 2018. There are collectors that host shows on KBOO and KFAI playing just whatever comes off the loading dock at the local Goodwill.

    It's probably not enough anywhere outside of major senior citizen pockets to be of any value to a full power commercial station. The younger audience is too scattered.

    But here's another interesting thing about B/EZ; Much of the various '50s, '60s and early '70s output (if not from big acts and big hits on big labels) exist in a twilight zone of copyright law known as "orphan recordings" (where if current recording ownership of long out of print records/tapes cannot be determined, the recording is considered public domain.) It's part of the new Music Modernization Act, which, through a process and over time, will likely unleash a flood of old B/EZ recordings. Labels themselves will probably clean their vaults of unmarketable old recordings.

    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/0...-belong-public

    Here's what they have thus far on Internet Archive. Granted, it's from vinyl, some of it with audible scratches. And the selection is as bona-fide thrift store as it gets

    https://archive.org/details/unlockedrecordings

    But B/EZ was literally everywhere in the '50s and '60s and it would not surprise me if the great bulk of it outside of the more famous major-label stuff is orphan by now. Or will be.
    My body is a temple; Ancient and crumbling. Probably cursed and haunted...

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Bongwater View Post

    But B/EZ was literally everywhere in the '50s and '60s and it would not surprise me if the great bulk of it outside of the more famous major-label stuff is orphan by now. Or will be.
    Orphan music is not likely to get any radio airplay because it's not officially licensed any more. That puts it into a strange legal category.

    Only licensed music can receive airplay.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Bellingham WA
    Posts
    6,092
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Orphan music is not likely to get any radio airplay because it's not officially licensed any more. That puts it into a strange legal category.

    Only licensed music can receive airplay.
    I wasn't expecting radio to pick up on that, just any EZ fans.
    My body is a temple; Ancient and crumbling. Probably cursed and haunted...

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Chatham, IL
    Posts
    2,014
    Quote Originally Posted by Bongwater View Post
    But here's another interesting thing about B/EZ; Much of the various '50s, '60s and early '70s output (if not from big acts and big hits on big labels) exist in a twilight zone of copyright law known as "orphan recordings" (where if current recording ownership of long out of print records/tapes cannot be determined, the recording is considered public domain.) It's part of the new Music Modernization Act, which, through a process and over time, will likely unleash a flood of old B/EZ recordings. Labels themselves will probably clean their vaults of unmarketable old recordings.

    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/0...-belong-public

    Here's what they have thus far on Internet Archive. Granted, it's from vinyl, some of it with audible scratches. And the selection is as bona-fide thrift store as it gets

    https://archive.org/details/unlockedrecordings
    I wouldn't be surprised if some of those orphan recordings on the Internet Archive were among those records David Letterman played in his occasional "Dave's Record Collection" segment of unusual recordings (during both his NBC and CBS days).

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  




     
Our Conferences
Useful Contacts
Community


Contact Us