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Thread: Hd is hot in cars

  1. #51

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    If you like sirius/xm free which I don't care for and free WIFI which is a nice plus. But who cares about heated seats and steering wheel, computer parking, voice commands and a million other things...I like my HD the best lmao, but no AM HD??

  2. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunsmoke View Post
    Finally the Ford I ordered with HD Radio finally came in today but you have to get the Titanium top of the line package. Funny thing there is no HD AM just FM even if AM HD is a flop, for the price of this package it should have HD on both bands...
    Attachment 1217
    I never pegged you as a “Praise” fan, but you’ve literally got it on all six of your presets

  3. #53
    I think HD radio could still take off...but it won't because that would take a concerted and unified effort by the industry (the radio industry; not iBiquity) to put on interesting programming and market it correctly. It's a shame to see good tech relegated to nothing more than a driver for translators. What a waste.
    Why would the industry pump a ton of money & resources into it? So, a finite advertising revenue pie can be split 50 or 60 different ways instead of 20 different ways? Some theorize the original long-term plan for HD Radio was to encrypt some or all of the subchannels to make them a subscription service. Whether or not that theory has any merit - I honestly do not know.

    Sound quality was never an issue among 95%+ of analog FM listeners, so we can remove that argument from the table, too.

    For AM band programming, signal issues and lack of mainstream programming are the biggest issues (the signal issues are the main reason mass-appeal programming has left the AM band in droves during the past 20 years). IBOC digital transmission on the AM band does absolutely nothing to resolve either of these issues. In fact, I would argue degradation to analog audio quality + increased noise caused by AM IBOC hastened the deterioration in AM band cume. Of course, you'll never see the FCC, iBiquity or one of the corporate media behemoths commission a study to research whether HD on AM has been a help or hindrance to the band's viability. They're afraid of the truth.

    In my home market, I've seen signal-deficient AM stations with 1.0 or 1.5 shares before IBOC adoption deteriorate to a 0.5 share, and ultimately, a 0.2 or 0.3 share following its adoption. I am not saying IBOC is the sole cause of the ratings decline, but what I am saying is that clearly it has done nothing to improve the long-term viability of these stations. AM stations that used to have an enterprise value of $10 million or even $15 million have recently been sold on a "stick value" basis for $3 million or less.

    Earlier commenters hit the nail on the head; if it weren't for the FM translator loophole granted by the FCC - HD Radio would be in even bigger trouble than it already is!

    The technology (from an adoption rate standpoint) was doomed from the get-go when the "brain trust" (read: idiots) behind this technology decided to force FM listeners to tune to the parent station as a pre-requisite for being able to access the HD-only subchannels. And, again, why would big radio stations have any incentive to push listeners away from their cash cows to HD-only subchannels?

    Once the AM band has deteriorated to the point where it is little more than a carbon copy of shortwave, the industry and the FCC should consider the following:
    --#1: Setting a timetable to convert the AM band to 100% digital
    --#2: Requiring all AM/FM radio manufacturers to include digital AM reception technology in their receivers in order to sell those units in the U.S.

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by MarkW View Post
    Why would the industry pump a ton of money & resources into it?
    Because at one time they were partners in it. Because at one time radio companies felt threatened by satellite radio, and needed a new product to offer. Because radio companies are always looking for new platforms to sell. It wouldn't divide the sales pie, but rather give them more inventory. To get around FCC ownership limits. Lots of reasons. What they didn't count on or expect was the explosion of cell phones and the internet. That changed the entire situation. It made buying new radios with the HD chip unnecessary. Why buy a new radio when you could buy a device that was the size of a credit card, that could be a phone, a camera, and a radio all in one? It killed the portable radio business. It killed the Walkman. It even killed the iPod. At that point, radio companies realized they had to redirect their energy towards streaming and accessing cell phones. HD Radio was on the scrapheap until the FCC provided the FM translator loophole you mentioned. But at one time, about 20 years ago, there were many reasons for the industry to be interested in HD radio. Around the same time, record labels felt if they could shut down file sharing, they could continue to make money selling CDs in stores. We saw what happened there.

  5. #55

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    Dec 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrocket87 View Post
    I never pegged you as a “Praise” fan, but you’ve literally got it on all six of your presets
    Thats how the radio came brand new, all presets set to 107.9, but I unloaded all of them quick, btw great observation lol

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