July Ratings - Page 4
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Thread: July Ratings

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post

    Smooth Jazz was already dying due to the aging of the audience
    In addition, the music had really become stagnant.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Bongwater View Post
    I wouldn't say 98.9 was cursed any more than any other frequency. It's just that when you add KEZX, KWJZ and KLCK, a lot of niche formats dominated. So by default, 98.9 became that "whatever" station for most listeners tuning by.
    Funny, I knew a few rock heads who preferred 98.9 to 99.9 or 102.5. I have to agree that perhaps they needed to put some more money into the promotion of the station, plus perhaps including more currents into its 80's-00's rock mix, livening up the mix a bit more. What 98.9 had over 99.9 is less talk. What they had over 102.5 is a more current mix of music. But that's all moot. They did what they did. Maybe KNUC will succeed. I wish them luck.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by boombox4 View Post
    Funny, I knew a few rock heads who preferred 98.9 to 99.9 or 102.5. I have to agree that perhaps they needed to put some more money into the promotion of the station, plus perhaps including more currents into its 80's-00's rock mix, livening up the mix a bit more. What 98.9 had over 99.9 is less talk. What they had over 102.5 is a more current mix of music. But that's all moot. They did what they did. Maybe KNUC will succeed. I wish them luck.
    KVRQ was probably the first actual non-niche format on 98.9. In my observation, listener perceptions are often slower to changes on frequencies they usually scan by or ignore (or completely bypass with preset buttons) Some people tune in, hear a few seconds of a song (some less than three) and if it doesn't instantly sound familiar. Or a REALLY hook-filled catchy tune. Or interesting talk, they'll keep scanning. Over time, the frequency they skip because it wasn't playing what they initially liked becomes subconsciously programmed into their minds AS something TO skip over. (Like The Golf Channel.) So when that station changes format, it's often completely overlooked for months before the new format is accidentally discovered or heard elsewhere. And some probably still think 98.9 is playing Joni Mitchell, Boney James, Adele and Metallica. That's why advertising and promotion are nothing to ignore these days with every other electronic distraction going on.

    Listeners are often no more democratic than the program directors.

    And one of the biggest misconceptions of the radio industry is ordinary people tune in and actually "sample" a station for at least 15 whole minutes before deciding to stay or go. Maybe under organized test and research conditions as well as people favorable to that, but not in real life and totally free will. I know, I've seen how people (especially younger people) do it in my car when I'm driving. A few still have "favorite" stations, but the rest are usually "shotgun DJs", zapping through the band (or whatever audio source available. Or their own USB/CDs) to find something they like. And never once have those radio-surfing people (and there are many) ever stayed on one frequency for an entire 15 minutes.

    I'm not really sure if I can chalk it up to an ADD or ADHD thing either because this kind of radio surfing actually existed when I was a teenager in the '80s as well. Maybe all that has been going on this whole time before we had call letters for it ("A-D-H-D....The station that....Oh look! PIZZA!....") But if someone did that on a PPM panel, I'm sure there would be a problem.
    To the person who stole my antidepressants; I hope you're happy now.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Bongwater View Post
    That's why advertising and promotion are nothing to ignore these days with every other electronic distraction going on.
    Marketing & promotion are more targeted than general advertising when trying to reach an audience for a radio format. So in this case, the radio station does remotes at all area country concerts and festivals. You'll see those listed at their web site. They'll do social media all day promoting the remote, and then it'll be the topic of conversation the next morning. Buying a TV ad or a highway billboard won't be as effective as the direct contact the station will have with potential P1s at a concert or festival. Unless that TV ad airs during the broadcast of a format based event, such as this past week's CMA Fest on ABC.

  5. #35

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    As far as the rock format on 98.9, I completely agree. I had one Access driver a couple months back who still misses the rock format, since there's no real current rock station in the market in afternoons. No KISW doesn't count since they only play like four songs an hour.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bongwater View Post

    And one of the biggest misconceptions of the radio industry is ordinary people tune in and actually "sample" a station for at least 15 whole minutes before deciding to stay or go. .
    In my 60 years in the industry, I have never heard that "misconception" mentioned ever. The standard assumption is that listeners who scan the radio bands will stop if they hear something similar to what they are looking for. Otherwise they do not spend more than a second or two, or they let their radio's scan function move to the next station.

    We know from decades of diary reviews that there are very few single quarter hour diary entries, showing that listeners just don't sample that way. Short incidents such as one quarter hour (meaning 5 actual minutes of listening) come from things like checking a news station for traffic before spending more time with a favorite morning show.

    The closest I ever saw to what you suggest was a contest by a new station... they distributed postcards via a supermarket chain asking listeners to "spend a half hour" with them, write down the songs, and mail the card. Some of the cards got cash prizes, so they were simply offering an incentive to listening, but also providing both proof of listening and emphasizing to new listeners the kind of songs they played. The contest worked very well, and the combination of "write down", "tell us what time" and forced listening was a powerful approximation of survey methodology. The station came out #1 in 18-49 women in one book.
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  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post



    The closest I ever saw to what you suggest was a contest by a new station... they distributed postcards via a supermarket chain asking listeners to "spend a half hour" with them, write down the songs, and mail the card. Some of the cards got cash prizes, so they were simply offering an incentive to listening, but also providing both proof of listening and emphasizing to new listeners the kind of songs they played. The contest worked very well, and the combination of "write down", "tell us what time" and forced listening was a powerful approximation of survey methodology. The station came out #1 in 18-49 women in one book.
    That actually is a great idea. You get listeners locked in for at least a proven 30min period, a potential co-op/ad contract with the supermarket chain, and listeners in a database who could be potential music research candidates. All for the price of some printed post cards? Now that's effective promotion!

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Goi View Post
    Bobby buddy baby, I done told you not to fall for that smooth jazz play - That was like SO long ago and in a diary method back some 20+ years ago so the point is MOOT. Hence the death of SJ NOT a PPM friendly format. Dang Bobby you need another cup of coffee er something. Everyone who's anyone who knows the market knows 98.9 is s a shit stick and will always be that unless MASSIVE amounts of money are spent on changing the perception in the public.
    That's a pretty clear display of inside thinking. Listeners barely know what frequency their favorite station is on, so I doubt there are many who are sitting there saying, "wow, over the last 8 years 98.9 was Jazz, then Click, then Rock, now The Bull." That's not how people consume this medium.

    By the way, KWJZ flipped 8 years ago, not 20.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelly A View Post
    That actually is a great idea. You get listeners locked in for at least a proven 30min period, a potential co-op/ad contract with the supermarket chain, and listeners in a database who could be potential music research candidates. All for the price of some printed post cards? Now that's effective promotion!
    Well, it worked. The station was WQII, a 10 kw operation on 1140 in San Juan, PR. This was our debut contest as an AC station after a total rebuild of studios and the transmitter during a 4-month off-air period. The supermarket owned the station, so I did not have trouble getting the idea through, as they saw it as a traffic builder. We ran out of cards several times, in fact.

    Likely to "old fashioned" (who mails a post card today?) but at the time it was enough to create powerful bonding with the listeners and to create good sampling. The frequency had a reputation of being a loser, after several failed formats in a row and in the local tabloid paper, the radio writer said, "not even Jesus Christ can revive that station." Shows you that there are no jinxed frequencies, just bad programming.
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  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    In addition, the music had really become stagnant.
    The last gasps of Smooth Jazz can be described as such:

    Motown vocal
    Instrumental cover of AC song
    Hall & Oates vocal
    Instrumental cover of Motown song
    Doobie Brothers or Michael McDonald solo vocal (bonus points for a Michael McDonald Motown cover)
    Gato Barbieri's cover of Europa (or similar "signature" SJ track of which there's a handful)
    Sting vocal
    Instrumental cover of Motown song
    Steely Dan vocal

    During the heyday of the format it sounded kind of hip, but at the end it just sounded old.

    The Sirius XM Watercolors channel has done a decent job of keeping the genre going without leaning too heavily on vocals. As someone who actually used to like the format, I got to the point where I couldn't listen to most Smooth Jazz FMs. I mean, I like Hall & Oates and Motown, but the list was so tight I got burned out on the repetition and I could figure the categories out after about a day of listening.
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