XEWW 690 to be Sold+ Flip to Mandarin Chinese Language Programming
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Thread: XEWW 690 to be Sold+ Flip to Mandarin Chinese Language Programming

  1. #1

    XEWW 690 to be Sold+ Flip to Mandarin Chinese Language Programming

    Grupo Latino de Radio (GLR) has announced it is selling its equity stake in XEWW (Spanish-language news-talk “W Radio”)
    to H&H Group USA, 97% controlled by Vivian Huo, with the remaining 3% owned by Julian Sant.

    The new owners propose a format “including music, entertainment, weather report, local (Los Angeles) traffic report and local Chinese community news.”

    InsideRadio.com story -->

    http://www.insideradio.com/free/soca...a4cd5925c.html

  2. #2

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    This is not a really, really late April Fool's, correct? If not, this is the weirdest flip I've ever seen. How can an XE station get away with Chinese programming? I know some are in English and operate from San Diego, but hasn't XEWW always been operated from a Tijuana studio (and sometimes from Mexico City?) WOW!
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by crainbebo View Post
    This is not a really, really late April Fool's, correct? If not, this is the weirdest flip I've ever seen. How can an XE station get away with Chinese programming? I know some are in English and operate from San Diego, but hasn't XEWW always been operated from a Tijuana studio (and sometimes from Mexico City?) WOW!
    I think that even after becoming XEWW the station was programmed from the US. If I understand correctly, the ownership of the station in Mexico has been fairly constant, but the companies leasing the programming have changed at least 3 times over the last 20 years.
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    Quote Originally Posted by crainbebo View Post
    This is not a really, really late April Fool's, correct? If not, this is the weirdest flip I've ever seen. How can an XE station get away with Chinese programming? I know some are in English and operate from San Diego, but hasn't XEWW always been operated from a Tijuana studio (and sometimes from Mexico City?) WOW!
    For the initial years after XETRA became XEWW the station operated out of studios in Burbank with LA talent that had been on stations like KWKW and KTNQ. When the signal proved to be unreliable for LA listening in this age of man-made noise, they started adding more programming from their Mexico City station, XEW, the flagship for their La W network.

    The market for the station is Tijuana and San Diego, but like many Mexican networked stations, local programming is not considered necessary.
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndavis View Post
    I think that even after becoming XEWW the station was programmed from the US. If I understand correctly, the ownership of the station in Mexico has been fairly constant, but the companies leasing the programming have changed at least 3 times over the last 20 years.
    Since becoming XEWW, the station has always been part of the multi-national Prisa group from Spain. For a while they programmed from LA but then switched to being mostly a repeater for XEW in Mexico City. Both are Prisa stations. GLR is a subsidiary of Prisa.
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    Quote Originally Posted by pjc1961 View Post
    The new owners propose a format “including music, entertainment, weather report, local (Los Angeles) traffic report and local Chinese community news.”
    They obviously don't understand that 690 does not have a usable signal in most of LA. Except along the coast, it's noisy reception. That's why the "W Radio" Spanish format did not register, even with billboard campaigns. And it is why 1090 gave up on trying to be an LA station, too.

    Somebody obviously has more money than brains.
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    Somebody obviously has more money than brains.
    Kind of like leasing time for China Radio International on a bunch of rimshot and daytimer AM stations. I still can't tell you who they expected to listen or why.
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  8. #8
    The Chinese and Taiwanese communities in San Diego are growing, as they are throughout California. For instance, there are about 20 of the 99 Ranch stores, catering to Chinese/Taiwanese shoppers in and around LA. But there are three in San Diego. Same for 85 Degrees Coffee Shops, a Taiwan based chain. There are about 25 or so in and around LA, four in San Diego and its suburbs.

    LA has one Mandarin radio station, and there's one in the Ontario area east of LA. So I suppose XETRA can target San Diego, with some listening in LA. If I remember correctly, 1240 was Mandarin part of the day at one time in San Diego. Of course, that was a 1000 watt station, while XETRA is 77,000 watts by day, 50,000 watts at night.

    Even in LA, I would imagine a Mandarin speaker might put up with a fuzzy signal, even if English and Spanish speakers might not, so he/she can hear his native language. And I didn't have any trouble hearing XEPRS or XETRA while driving around LA recently. I don't remember any dead spots or places where the noise became too much. I don't think I'd get a decent signal on a home radio. But in the car, they were fine.

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