why would anyone listen to FM T-radio in Philly for music - Page 3
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Thread: why would anyone listen to FM T-radio in Philly for music

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Bongwater View Post
    Commercial terrestrial radio has a certain order that some currently find appealing. It's not usually my first choice in 2018 because I can remember a time and not very long ago, I was once 100,000 watt dedicated to terrestrial radio. I'm at increasingly conflicted odds these days. But for others today, it still is.

    Non-commercial terrestrial radio is almost a completely different beast altogether. But already, easy listening, oldies, AAA and other discarded formats end up here.

    But as commercial radio chases the kids for the sake of semi-relevance in an age where many young people have actually never even HEARD of a radio. This is not a joke. I introduced not one but FIVE teenagers to radio in the last THREE years. Again, I am not making this up. But I don't blame them at all. Or even their parents. High tech distracts. Look at where we are now talking.

    But the point is terrestrial radio is now probably showing it's age. Which by having two teenage kids personally is not hard to observe. They're not growing up in the era of Gary Lockwood, Charlie & Ty, Crow & West and the legendary stuff of Seattle radio I grew up with. They want to cut to the chase. Which is music.

    It doesn't bode well for the future of the local "air personality" on commercial radio stations at this rate (but let's be honest and face this; It isn't like anything else really has in the last 22 years.) And in 2018, this is where we are. And what's shaped in the past (right now) often sets the course for the discernible future.

    I don't think radio has never been the first choice of the younger generation. Singles, 8 tracks, cassettes (mixtapes), CD's and Mp3s have always been the thing for them. Even in my early 20's when I got started in radio, my peers spent time making their own tapes and CD's, but we listened to radio to discover new music and trends. When I hit my late 20's my music collection was less important. I just wanted a easy to access music. That was radio and is still the choice of the 25-54 age group.

    Talk to folks in their mid 50's and older and they will say radio (new music in general) is awful. "Give me the days when music and radio was great"

    I have a good friend who just turned 60. He says "with all due respect I can't stand your station, but he also quit keeping up with music in 1980. He said "Now if you would play some Marty Robbins, and John Prine I might listen". I said Marty Robbins is okay, but he is ancient to me. I remember my dad listening to him. He laughed.

    There are kids now who couldn't name 3 or 4 Prince, Madonna, or Michael Jackson songs.

    The method hasn't changed. It is the person that has aged.



    Radio is still very much alive and well.
    Last edited by Groove1670; 06-29-2018 at 05:39 PM.
    WLYB FM
    96.3 Demopolis AL.
    100.5 Meridian Mississippi.

    WRYC FM
    92.5 Frisco City/Monroeville

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Groove1670 View Post
    I don't think radio has never been the first choice of the younger generation. Singles, 8 tracks, cassettes (mixtapes), CD's and Mp3s have always been the thing for them.
    Imagine a world with no cassettes, no 8-tracks, no CDs, no recordable devices at all. If you can imagine that, that's what it was like to live in the 50s and 60s. So those folks had no choice but to hear their music on the radio. Or go to a store and buy records (that they couldn't sample before hand).

    Folks from that era think radio has changed. But really, a lot more than radio has changed.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Imagine a world with no cassettes, no 8-tracks, no CDs, no recordable devices at all. If you can imagine that, that's what it was like to live in the 50s and 60s. So those folks had no choice but to hear their music on the radio. Or go to a store and buy records (that they couldn't sample before hand).
    .
    I remember the time in the later 50's and early 60's when record stores had listening booths where you could try a 45 before buying.

    I bought 45's at several different ones like this in Ohio, and also at record stores in Miami, Mexico, El Salvador and Colombia.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
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  4. #24
    When I-pods first came out and everyone had to have one to be cool, most people who bought these devices that could hold 10,000 songs had a couple hundred songs on them at most. These are the people who listen to fm radio. They like to hear the hits, they have a more passive response when it comes to music. They also do not desire to take the time to build their own playlists. They like the simplicity of just hitting a few buttons until they hear a song that they like. They also do not want to waste their precious data on streaming services. A couple years ago I started a mixshow on a hit music radio station that had some imaging with my name in it. I did not a say a word that it would be coming to your radio or the station. Within 5 minutes of it airing I started to get a bunch of texts of people asking me about it. Yeah if you asked those people who texted me about my mixshow that they were listening to on their fm radios, they would tell you that they don't listen to the radio.

  5. #25
    As has been pointed out previously, if I recall, reported and observed behaviors can be quite different.

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