English-Language Stations Dealing with Mexican Elections - Page 2
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Thread: English-Language Stations Dealing with Mexican Elections

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gr8oldies View Post
    I get that, but at the same time Spanish language stations run English language copy all the time
    Big difference. There is minimal objection by listeners to US Spanish language stations to hearing ads in English; running Spanish material on an English language stations brings out the worst in some people.
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  2. #12
    I guess it's a case where newcomers to the U.S. want to learn English and hearing some English content on a Latin radio station is accepted. But some Americans think Spanish is a nuisance. Some people even complain about phone messages where you are asked to press one for English, two for Spanish. These days, they only ask in Spanish to press two. Doing nothing connects you to English automatically.

    Back to the OP: I just listened to XEPRS and the station does run El Himno Nacional at 4:58 a.m., as well as 11:58 p.m. (It runs a few minutes early so 1090 can rejoin ESPN at the top of the hour.) I wonder why it gets two plays a day? Maybe Mexican law says it must be played at midnight AND 5 a.m.?

    About 91X. I was listening over the internet. I suspect XETRA-FM played the national anthem on the air at midnight and 5am, but blocked it on the internet stream. I could just hear at the end of a few commercials the words "Back to regular programming" as we rejoined the air product. I assume if the air product was playing commercials at midnight and 5 a.m., just slightly different ones, there'd be no need to say "back to regular programming." Perhaps someone in So. Cal. could check 91X on the air.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg. View Post
    I guess it's a case where newcomers to the U.S. want to learn English and hearing some English content on a Latin radio station is accepted. But some Americans think Spanish is a nuisance. Some people even complain about phone messages where you are asked to press one for English, two for Spanish. These days, they only ask in Spanish to press two. Doing nothing connects you to English automatically.

    Back to the OP: I just listened to XEPRS and the station does run El Himno Nacional at 4:58 a.m., as well as 11:58 p.m. (It runs a few minutes early so 1090 can rejoin ESPN at the top of the hour.) I wonder why it gets two plays a day? Maybe Mexican law says it must be played at midnight AND 5 a.m.?

    About 91X. I was listening over the internet. I suspect XETRA-FM played the national anthem on the air at midnight and 5am, but blocked it on the internet stream. I could just hear at the end of a few commercials the words "Back to regular programming" as we rejoined the air product. I assume if the air product was playing commercials at midnight and 5 a.m., just slightly different ones, there'd be no need to say "back to regular programming." Perhaps someone in So. Cal. could check 91X on the air.
    The internet stream blocks about 30% of commercials (often with an "oldie" from the 90s) The national anthem is heard online maybe once per week. The full commercial load and the national anthem, along with all of the other governmental announcements are heard over the air.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg. View Post
    I guess it's a case where newcomers to the U.S. want to learn English and hearing some English content on a Latin radio station is accepted.
    Actually, the reasons given is that advertisers 1) don't want to change creative and 2) the persons of Hispanic heritage they want to reach are going to understand English anyway.

    Listeners, when researched, tend to be neutral. Some think they are good, some don't care, and others don't like it.
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