Rhythmic or Urban AC format in Phoenix market? - Page 2
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Thread: Rhythmic or Urban AC format in Phoenix market?

  1. #11
    DrAkbar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndavis View Post

    So Edens essentially blew up both. Tim Hattrick was hired to be paired with Bill Heywood and the MOR became straight AC. KQYT became 95.5 KOY-FM. The AM simulcast the FM except at night (where I think they still had a sports talk show that competed with KTAR back then).
    Actually the FM simulcasted the dated presentation of the AM. Tim Hattrick said he felt honored to work with Heywood...his admiration was like that he had of his grandfather. Ouch! It was beyond terrible and quickly changed to Y95, leaving 5~Fifty with satellite delivered programming.

    If you're not delivering people to those advertisers, you need to be committed to changing to something that will.
    We have a winner...no more calls please!
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    Hey Alexa, call Doc & Nurse Jeff...we're really screwed up!

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAkbar View Post
    Actually the FM simulcasted the dated presentation of the AM. Tim Hattrick said he felt honored to work with Heywood...his admiration was like that he had of his grandfather. Ouch! It was beyond terrible and quickly changed to Y95, leaving 5~Fifty with satellite delivered programming.
    Oh, it was a complete trainwreck to listen to. It just goes to prove that no matter how good your intentions may have been when you started, once you put it on the air and realize it's bombing, you don't stay committed to it.

    It's kind of like the people who ask me how we came up with stunting with NBA intermission music for 6 months and I have to explain, no, our boss really thought that was going to be a thing...

    I still maintain that the period of time when Y-95 sounded the best was when Kevin & Michelle were programming it out of Q-106. But others will disagree with me on that.
    The opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers. Retweets are not endorsements.

  3. #13
    You mean to tell me that this wasn't going to work? We're headed for the future, baby...

    #hellotherefellowteens

    https://formatchange.com/95-5-kqyt-p...ecomes-koy-fm/
    The opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers. Retweets are not endorsements.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by johndavis View Post
    Ah yes, the "they weren't committed to the format" argument.

    Let's spin the time machine back to the 80s at the stations that were originally at 840 N. Central.

    KOY was a full-service AC station with a news department that rivaled KTAR's in size and depth. KQYT was a Beautiful Music station.

    Both were being left behind by the times. Middle of the Road music on AM was being beat by AC on FM. Beautiful Music was the Smooth Jazz of its day and had fallen out of favor with advertisers.

    So Edens essentially blew up both. Tim Hattrick was hired to be paired with Bill Heywood and the MOR became straight AC. KQYT became 95.5 KOY-FM. The AM simulcast the FM except at night (where I think they still had a sports talk show that competed with KTAR back then). They sank money into billboards. They did events. They did their research. And it didn't work. KOY-FM went top 40. KOY became satellite fed nostalgia. This made the stations competitive and profitable and they rode that horse up until they were sold.

    I suppose that if Gary had an infinite supply of money he could have kept doing what wasn't working, but that supply was not infinite. I also know that the cost of each of the changes was not cheap. But here's the point: you don't do a format because you're committed to the music.

    You do it because you're committed to delivering listeners to advertisers. If you're not delivering people to those advertisers, you need to be committed to changing to something that will.
    But in all fairness, if all you do is play 25 or 30 of the same songs over and over, that is going to cause audience burnout. One example would be the Classic Hip-Hop format. The format CONCEPT is a good one, but without variety, it gets stale very quickly. How many times can someone listen to "Just a Friend", "Push It", "Bust a Move" or "Gin and Juice"? You have to add other hits besides the top ten to keep listeners tuned in.

  5. #15
    DrAkbar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johndavis View Post
    You mean to tell me that this wasn't going to work? We're headed for the future, baby...

    #hellotherefellowteens

    https://formatchange.com/95-5-kqyt-p...ecomes-koy-fm/
    It was an AM approach to FM radio. Gary Edens loved KOY so much, he figured listeners would love it twice as much if it was on FM. And speaking of Twice (KTWC).....nah, let's not bring that up here!

    I still maintain that the period of time when Y-95 sounded the best was when Kevin & Michelle were programming it out of Q-106. But others will disagree with me on that.
    No disagreement from Los Buckeye Boyz. Y95 sounded pretty good at times...just not good all the time.
    Dr. Akbar 'n Nurse Jeff
    The Middle Eastern Men of the Media
    Buckeye, AZ

    Hey Alexa, call Doc & Nurse Jeff...we're really screwed up!

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAkbar View Post
    It was an AM approach to FM radio. Gary Edens loved KOY so much, he figured listeners would love it twice as much if it was on FM. And speaking of Twice (KTWC).....nah, let's not bring that up here!



    No disagreement from Los Buckeye Boyz. Y95 sounded pretty good at times...just not good all the time.
    Y95 sounded its best once KZZP started its drift toward Hot AC which led to their flip to Variety. I still preferred Power’s sound at the time though.

    I also thought KUKQ could have put a couple more years into their R&B format. But the owners were fighting for their licenses and thought they could be in a better position with country. Until KMLE came along, that is.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by johndavis View Post
    Ah yes, the "they weren't committed to the format" argument.

    Let's spin the time machine back to the 80s at the stations that were originally at 840 N. Central.

    KOY was a full-service AC station with a news department that rivaled KTAR's in size and depth. KQYT was a Beautiful Music station.

    Both were being left behind by the times. Middle of the Road music on AM was being beat by AC on FM. Beautiful Music was the Smooth Jazz of its day and had fallen out of favor with advertisers.

    So Edens essentially blew up both. Tim Hattrick was hired to be paired with Bill Heywood and the MOR became straight AC. KQYT became 95.5 KOY-FM. The AM simulcast the FM except at night (where I think they still had a sports talk show that competed with KTAR back then). They sank money into billboards. They did events. They did their research. And it didn't work. KOY-FM went top 40. KOY became satellite fed nostalgia. This made the stations competitive and profitable and they rode that horse up until they were sold.

    I suppose that if Gary had an infinite supply of money he could have kept doing what wasn't working, but that supply was not infinite. I also know that the cost of each of the changes was not cheap. But here's the point: you don't do a format because you're committed to the music.

    You do it because you're committed to delivering listeners to advertisers. If you're not delivering people to those advertisers, you need to be committed to changing to something that will.
    That is an interesting comment. One that the late Lew Silverstein and Jason Zinziletta would agree with. KAHM has been easy listening since day one. Lew and now Jason are committed to the format and they have been and continue to be profitable.......

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by thepumpin1 View Post
    But in all fairness, if all you do is play 25 or 30 of the same songs over and over, that is going to cause audience burnout. One example would be the Classic Hip-Hop format. The format CONCEPT is a good one, but without variety, it gets stale very quickly. How many times can someone listen to "Just a Friend", "Push It", "Bust a Move" or "Gin and Juice"? You have to add other hits besides the top ten to keep listeners tuned in.
    How many years have stations been playing Brown Eyed Girl?

    If the songs are strong enough to endure, they will.

    When you sign on a new format, you start with a tight list of songs that everyone knows. If you loosen that up too much, then people don't know the songs. If you burn out the library and you don't have equally strong songs to rotate in, you end up playing a bunch of songs that nobody wants to hear. I'm in Houston now; I listened to the rise and fall of Boom 92. When it signed on, I knew 3 out of every 4 songs they played in a quarter hour. On its last day, I knew 0 out of 4 in a quarter hour. Granted, I'm older than the target, but that's how a radio station goes from being the one that everyone is talking about to one that nobody noticed it flipped.

    Everybody says they want variety, but what that means is they want a variety of stuff they know and like.
    The opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers. Retweets are not endorsements.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by johndavis View Post
    How many years have stations been playing Brown Eyed Girl?

    If the songs are strong enough to endure, they will.

    When you sign on a new format, you start with a tight list of songs that everyone knows. If you loosen that up too much, then people don't know the songs. If you burn out the library and you don't have equally strong songs to rotate in, you end up playing a bunch of songs that nobody wants to hear. I'm in Houston now; I listened to the rise and fall of Boom 92. When it signed on, I knew 3 out of every 4 songs they played in a quarter hour. On its last day, I knew 0 out of 4 in a quarter hour. Granted, I'm older than the target, but that's how a radio station goes from being the one that everyone is talking about to one that nobody noticed it flipped.

    Everybody says they want variety, but what that means is they want a variety of stuff they know and like.
    I get you play what people like. But you also don't burn people out on the same few songs either. There has to be a balance. When radio stations begin to play certain songs over and over, I TUNE OUT!!!! If people want variety, get an IPOD.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by thepumpin1 View Post
    I get you play what people like. But you also don't burn people out on the same few songs either. There has to be a balance. When radio stations begin to play certain songs over and over, I TUNE OUT!!!!
    If you really like the song, you don't notice or mind the repetition. You always turn up your favorite songs.

    If it irritates you that you're hearing it often, then you don't like it anymore.

    We use tight lists when launching a new format because you want the first impression someone gets is to be a good one.

    If you don't manage the library properly, you burn it to a crisp. The funny thing is, if the songs are good enough, with enough rest they can come back and people don't hate them. If they're weak to begin with, there's no amount of rest that's going to save them.
    The opinions expressed are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of my employers. Retweets are not endorsements.

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