99X Ordered Off the Air - Page 3
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Thread: 99X Ordered Off the Air

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveR View Post
    I started working for Steve in September 2014, so I showed up three years into the battle. Cume Less's translator is on the Richland Tower near Druid Hills. It is mounted below the Master FM antenna at an AGL of 1,100 feet. I remember when they installed the antenna and translators back in 2011. I was working for WKHX at the time. The FCC allows translators a ERP of 250 Watts, regardless of HAAT. Even though Cume Less did design the ERI panel antenna with a null to the west to Protect WWGA, the HAAT played more of a part than the ERP. In their original application it was clear that they would interfere with WWGA's 40 and 50 dbu contour, which covers Villa Rica, but the FCC approved it anyway. WWGA signed on about 6 months before Cume Less's translator went live. So, there was a coverage track record. That's when the trouble started. The FCC treats translators as a secondary service and the rules clearly state that the translator cannot interfere with any primary service. Unfortunately the way the rules are written, there must be complaints from dis-interested parties (people who have no connections to either of the parties involved in the complaint) before action can be taken by the FCC. IMHO, I have an issue with the rule which allows translators to be used for rebroadcast of HD2 signals. This is stretch from the original rule allowing daytime AM stations to use translators. Cume Less has appealed the decision but, there is little chance the FCC will change its decision. Cume Less demonstrated a legal plan of "burying" the little guy and waiting out the complainants. It was obvious in their filings. Kudos to Steve Gradick and the complainants who did stuck it out for the long run. This is definitely a David vs. Goliath story!
    Gradick runs good, community oriented stations and I'm glad, for once, the "good guy" won one!

  2. #22
    The fact Cumulus has wasted so much time & energy on a translator facility that over many years has featured programming with low to even anemic ratings (remember Nash Icon 98.9?) is astounding.

    I don't see any evidence of a westward null on the below pattern; it looks like the null is to the SW and very shallow. There appears to be another shallow null due east. Granted, directional patterns on the R-L site aren't always 100% accurate.

    https://radio-locator.com/cgi-bin/patg?id=W255CJ-FX

  3. #23
    Can someone articulate why a Class A, meant to be a local radio station almost 60 miles away from Atlanta, is entitled to protection from a "metro signal" that can't possibly be reaching the market WWGA was licensed to serve?

    It sounds like someone's annoyed they're not getting something they were never entitled to or intended to have in the first place.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Travis View Post
    Can someone articulate why a Class A, meant to be a local radio station almost 60 miles away from Atlanta, is entitled to protection from a "metro signal" that can't possibly be reaching the market WWGA was licensed to serve?

    It sounds like someone's annoyed they're not getting something they were never entitled to or intended to have in the first place.
    If you want to pull out the rule book...

    Most, if not all 250 watt translators at 1000 feet HAAT break long held FCC R&R. They often preclude licensing of community LPFM stations. And they sometimes/often interfere with licensed and protected broadcast operations. The cumulus translator creates interference to the Tallapoosa station. Why then can't cumulus move its translator back to 99.1? Because it interferes with one of THEIR stations in Macon.
    The translator creates interference inside of WWGA's 60 dbu contour. There is nothing further to articulate.

    Cumulus needs another station in Atlanta like they need another bill to pay...they need to fix the stations they already have before the FCC gives them even more. Why are they "entitled to or intended to have" another radio station in a market with 40-60 stations?
    Last edited by wavo; 04-17-2018 at 04:48 PM.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by acheron1982 View Post
    But I donít think itís billing well... Or is it? I donít have that data but based on what I read here, 106.7 isnít billing well. Does anyone really know? Just curious.
    I don't know for sure, but talk stations tend to bill pretty well because:
    1) they have better demos than music counterparts
    2) the listening is more "active" so people really pay closer attention to the commercials
    3) they tend to run way more spots than music stations

    Although it's more expensive to run a news-talk operation, the payback is higher.

  6. #26

    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Travis View Post
    Can someone articulate why a Class A, meant to be a local radio station almost 60 miles away from Atlanta, is entitled to protection from a "metro signal" that can't possibly be reaching the market WWGA was licensed to serve?

    It sounds like someone's annoyed they're not getting something they were never entitled to or intended to have in the first place.
    I think it's because a class D translator can't interfere with ANY reception of a class Cx/A. Even outside the class Cx/A's contour. Heck, I bet if you were DXing a class Cx FM station and a nearby cochannel translator was interfering with it, the DX class Cx FM would still take precedence according to FCC rules.
    "When broadcasting over the radio, there are certain words we must omit.
    Like 'BEEP' and 'BUZZ' and 'GOBBLE-GOBBLE', by gosh we can't even say shhhhhaving cream!"

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
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    Cumulus said many times in the filings that the translator was a major market station listened to by thousands each day. I really that that was a slap in the face. The people of a small town are not as important as those in a metro area. I translated those statements to mean the station that made the most money and had the most listeners should be the one that wins with the FCC.

    By the way, the "translator" is not a station by FCC definition.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by wavo View Post
    If you want to pull out the rule book...

    Most, if not all 250 watt translators at 1000 feet HAAT break long held FCC R&R. They often preclude licensing of community LPFM stations. And they sometimes/often interfere with licensed and protected broadcast operations. The cumulus translator creates interference to the Tallapoosa station. Why then can't cumulus move its translator back to 99.1? Because it interferes with one of THEIR stations in Macon.
    The translator creates interference inside of WWGA's 60 dbu contour. There is nothing further to articulate.

    Cumulus needs another station in Atlanta like they need another bill to pay...they need to fix the stations they already have before the FCC gives them even more. Why are they "entitled to or intended to have" another radio station in a market with 40-60 stations?
    VERY WELL STATED.

    At the end of the day, the FCC is turning a blind eye to corporate radio's abuse of the translator. It was never intended to be a back door into major markets and allow conglomerates to suck up every FM channel not in use. But, like everything else, it's all about the money and big dollars rule. The great "Radio Assist Ministry" scam is what brought us this mess. And translating HD carriers within the same primary coverage contour? How is this even legal?

    As much as I liked 99X, if Cumulus really believed in the idea, they would have put it on one of their many full power facilities like 100.5 or 106.7.
    The views stated here are strictly the opinions of the author and in no way reflect those of his employer, contractors, clients, family, friends, associates, distant relatives et al. No animals were harmed by the posting of the author's opinions. Your mileage may vary. No warranties are offered, expressed or implied. All statements, advice, opinions are offered on an "as-is" and "hold harmless" basis.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by MRFLASHPORT View Post
    At the end of the day, the FCC is turning a blind eye to corporate radio's abuse of the translator. It was never intended to be a back door into major markets and allow conglomerates to suck up every FM channel not in use.
    Any operator could have filed for those translators, not just "corporate radio." The situation is that translators are seen by the FCC as the solution for multiple problems, such as AM revitalization and the slow growth of HD Radio. The latter is the case here. This translator is carrying the programming of an HD-2 station. Right now, there is a group of AM operators lobbying the FCC to make AM translators primary stations. Once they get primary status, they would be able to shut down their AM transmitter. They think it's a good idea. They are not corporate owners. What makes that OK and this not?

    Read this:

    https://www.radiodiscussions.com/sho...light=windfall

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Any operator could have filed for those translators, not just "corporate radio." The situation is that translators are seen by the FCC as the solution for multiple problems, such as AM revitalization and the slow growth of HD Radio. The latter is the case here. This translator is carrying the programming of an HD-2 station. Right now, there is a group of AM operators lobbying the FCC to make AM translators primary stations. Once they get primary status, they would be able to shut down their AM transmitter. They think it's a good idea. They are not corporate owners. What makes that OK and this not?

    Read this:

    https://www.radiodiscussions.com/sho...light=windfall
    Yes, over the past few years the FCC has encouraged the establishment of FM translators to revitalize AM. (Thanks, Chairman Pai.) And the FCC allows FM translators to "translate" HD Radio signals although I've never read the purpose was to help the growth of HD Radio, which seems pretty much dead. The original purpose of translators was to fill in signal holes in a station's home market.

    Using FM translators to put on a new FM station is an example of the FCC not seeing the forest from the trees. Another example is years ago the FCC created Class A stations, lower-wattage FM's, for the purpose of providing service to small markets. So what happened? Broadcasters applied for and won licenses for a Class A FM stations in suburbs of a major markets. Of course, the owners' real purpose was not to serve the small town they were in but to compete for ratings and ad revenue in the adjacent major market.

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