Trumpís Budget Again Proposes Elimination of Public TV, Arts Funding
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Thread: Trumpís Budget Again Proposes Elimination of Public TV, Arts Funding

  1. #1

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    Trumpís Budget Again Proposes Elimination of Public TV, Arts Funding

    http://variety.com/2018/tv/news/trum...ng-1202695205/

    Interesting how these debates come up though.

    WASHINGTON ó President Donald Trumpís newly unveiled 2019 budget again proposes the elimination of funding for the three major entities that award federal funding for public broadcasting and the arts: the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

    The $4.4 trillion budget proposal is not much of a surprise to public TV and arts advocates, as Trumpís 2018 budget also called for zeroing out such funding. Instead, funding survived, which is a testament to just how much of a wish-list the White House budget really is, as opposed to something that will actually gain traction on Capitol Hill.

    The rationale that the White House makes for eliminating the federal funding is that the outlay can be made up for by private donations and grants at the state level.

    ďCPB funding comprises about 15% of the total amount spent on public broadcasting, with the remainder coming from non-federal sources, with many large stations raising an even greater share,Ē the budget states. ďThis private fundraising has proven durable, negating the need for continued federal subsidies.

    ďServices such as PBS and NPR, which receive funding from CPB, could make up the shortfall by increasing revenues from corporate sponsors, foundations, and members. In addition, alternatives to PBS and NPR programming have grown substantially since CPB was first established in 1967, greatly reducing the need for publicly-funded programming options,Ē the budget reads.

    CPB has received about $445 million in federal funding in recent years.

    ďPublic broadcasting has earned bipartisan congressional support over the years thanks to the value we provide to taxpayers,Ē PBS president and CEO Paula Kerger said in a statement.

    She said the network and its 350 member stations and local supporters ďwill continue to remind leaders in Washington of the significant benefits the public receives in return for federal funding, a modest investment of about $1.35 per citizen per year.Ē

    The NEA and NEH have each received about $150 million in federal funding, but they too have survived. In fact, their budgets increased slightly last year as Congress has funded the government through a series of short-term continuing resolutions.

    Dana Gioia, who chaired the NEA under President George W. Bush, predicted several weeks ago that the arts funding would remain safe this year.

  2. #2
    Once again, the president's budget will be treated the same way it's been treated for the past 20 years. DOA.

    A large number of the country's public broadcasting stations are owned by state governments. Many of them are run by Republican governors. They don't agree with the White House on this issue.

    On this same day, the president has come up with an infrastructure plan that seeks support from those very same state governments. You don't take away money from someone, and then ask them for money at the same time. Just bad politics.

  3. #3

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    PBS can make it on it's own without government funding they can get Retrans money like Sinclair's, Nexstar's, Scripps etc. And those that want to donate to PBS be my guess as well PBS doesn't need tax dollars just like NPR as well.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Megatron View Post
    PBS can make it on it's own without government funding they can get Retrans money like Sinclair's, Nexstar's, Scripps etc. And those that want to donate to PBS be my guess as well PBS doesn't need tax dollars just like NPR as well.
    PBS doesn't in fact own any TV stations. None. PBS is not like Sinclair, Nexstar, etc. So explain to me how they can get retrains money if they don't in fact own TV stations.

    And what about public radio stations?

    BTW, the public is not allowed to donate money to PBS.

    Any more ideas?

  5. #5

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    The big-market PBS stations (WTTW/WNET/KCTS/KQED/etc.) will stay on even with a deep government cut - they'd still be able to get plenty of $$$ from their pledge drives and members. But this could cause problems for smaller statewide or standalone stations - Montana PBS, SDPB, secondary PBS stations like KBTC and KVCR, etc. Even the PBS CEO, Paula Kerger, said that 'a number of our stations will [go away]', 'there's no Plan B' in a TV critics' meeting back in late July 2017.
    Same thing goes with NPR stations. I don't expect KJZZ, WNYC, KQED or KUOW to go away any time soon. But what about those in small towns, like the Alaska NPR's which in some cases, are the only radio station in the town? The big shots in DC don't understand that some of these NPR stations are the only lifeline for news, local weather and information for small communities.
    I'm hoping the funding can still continue - even if we all have to petition for that!
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  6. #6
    This is good news, and eliminating the CPB will not mean the end of all PBS stations. This could be the year that CPB finally goes away. Those that the listeners and watchers of the stations choose to support will endure and those that don't likely weren't serving enough people to justify a subsidy in any case. Could free up spectrum for broadcasting that people will actually utilize!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by crainbebo View Post
    The big-market PBS stations (WTTW/WNET/KCTS/KQED/etc.) will stay on even with a deep government cut - they'd still be able to get plenty of $$$ from their pledge drives and members. But this could cause problems for smaller statewide or standalone stations - Montana PBS, SDPB, secondary PBS stations like KBTC and KVCR, etc. Even the PBS CEO, Paula Kerger, said that 'a number of our stations will [go away]', 'there's no Plan B' in a TV critics' meeting back in late July 2017.
    Same thing goes with NPR stations. I don't expect KJZZ, WNYC, KQED or KUOW to go away any time soon. But what about those in small towns, like the Alaska NPR's which in some cases, are the only radio station in the town? The big shots in DC don't understand that some of these NPR stations are the only lifeline for news, local weather and information for small communities.
    I'm hoping the funding can still continue - even if we all have to petition for that!
    CPB funding is used to produce programming carried on PBS/NPR stations. I'm not sure why the Republicans, let alone the current administration has spotlighted public broadcasting or CPB. Compared with other government-funded things, the amount spent on public broadcasting is a rounding error.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by umfan View Post
    Those that the listeners and watchers of the stations choose to support will endure and those that don't likely weren't serving enough people to justify a subsidy in any case. Could free up spectrum for broadcasting that people will actually utilize!
    Lots of people utilize public broadcasting, particularly in red states. In fact, there are parts of certain very red states (such as Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) where the public station is the ONLY media available. The Republican governors, particularly those in rural states, need this federal appropriation, and they have made that known to Congress. State-owned public broadcasting authorities are very powerful in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Ohio, which are battleground states for Republicans. They know if they vote against this funding, it could cost them those states, and ultimately their majority.

  9. #9
    Nothing will stop these stations from enduring, if those that use them are willing to support them. Might actually make the stations add programming that their listeners actually want. I'm hopeful the CPB is on the way to the trash heap where it belongs.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by umfan View Post
    Nothing will stop these stations from enduring, if those that use them are willing to support them. Might actually make the stations add programming that their listeners actually want. I'm hopeful the CPB is on the way to the trash heap where it belongs.
    Once again, most of these stations are owned by state broadcasting authorities, and most of those governors are Republicans. If you have an issue with these stations, your complaint should be with the states. Public broadcasting isn't intended to compete with commercial broadcasting, but rather provide services the commercial stations ignore for ratings and revenue reasons. This has always been the purpose of public broadcasting going back 50 years, and it's always received bipartisan support. The only people opposed are a small minority of tea party people, who simply don't have the votes to force their ideology on the majority. That's the case here.

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