When KLIF 1190 Dallas, Tx. went STEREO 1977 - Page 2
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Thread: When KLIF 1190 Dallas, Tx. went STEREO 1977

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by ContinuousWave View Post
    AM stereo was proposed in the 1950s but the FCC didn't see a need for it...Kahn was testing his ISB system in 1960 on XTRA in Baja...which gave it S CA coverage..
    But as former CE of 1190, I never saw any indication at either site it ran stereo..
    That would make sense, I've heard when Clear Channel got the station there was still a lot of McLendon era gear hooked up which definitely would've predated AM Stereo in Dallas. (Wasn't 570 the first here?)

    The only AM Stereo stations in the area I'm aware of were 570, 620, 770, 820, and 1400.

  2. #12
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    Wasn't AM Stereo supposed to save Ancient Modulation? The number of stations running it at the time probably exceeded the number of radios capable of receiving AM Stereo. And of course, two different operating systems didn't help matters. What a joke!
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  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by LibertyNT View Post
    That would make sense, I've heard when Clear Channel got the station there was still a lot of McLendon era gear hooked up which definitely would've predated AM Stereo in Dallas. (Wasn't 570 the first here?)

    The only AM Stereo stations in the area I'm aware of were 570, 620, 770, 820, and 1400.
    I think 1310 was too, when they were KAAM, using the Kahn-Hazeltine system.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrAkbar View Post
    Wasn't AM Stereo supposed to save Ancient Modulation? The number of stations running it at the time probably exceeded the number of radios capable of receiving AM Stereo. And of course, two different operating systems didn't help matters. What a joke!
    What killed AM radio was not a system but a person: Leonard Kahn.

    While the FCC planned to have one of five systems approved and ready to go by late '77 or early '78 (When AM still had half the listening), Kahn sued and delayed stereo for 5 years... by which time AM was dead as a music medium.
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  5. #15
    I recall the old KRQX 570 had gorgeous AM stereo audio quality on my Sony SRF-A1. Also sounded great on mono receivers; very well engineered by then-owner Belo.

  6. #16
    Yes, I remember the "in and out" sound of stereo. Quite distracting.

  7. #17
    AM stereo was an improvement in sound quality, but it didn't cure the problems with static. I remember when KAAM and KMKI Radio Disney used C-Quam in the 90's and early 2000's. They sounded brighter even on a mono car stereo.

    And I remember Motorola was forcing electronic corporations like Sony and Panasonic to buy their AM Stereo decoding chips. Many companies didn't want to to pay for them. So there were very few AM Stereo radios for sale when there should have been a huge flood of AM Stereo radios, boomboxes, receivers, car stereos, walkmans etc hitting the store shelves. The FCC should have forced Motorola to put that chip design in the public domain so any company could make them.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    What killed AM radio was not a system but a person: Leonard Kahn.

    While the FCC planned to have one of five systems approved and ready to go by late '77 or early '78 (When AM still had half the listening), Kahn sued and delayed stereo for 5 years... by which time AM was dead as a music medium.
    I would take issue with blaming Mr. Kahn. The FCC and set makers are to blame. In 1980, the FCC selected an AM Stereo standard from Magnavox, only to recind it two years later after a ton of complaints from stations and set manufacturers. By allowing the issue to be decided "by the market" with 4 competing systems, the FCC doomed the prospects of AM stereo. Mr. Kahn had one of the 4 systems. After a year or so, it was down to Motorola's C-Quam and the Kahn/Hazeltine system. If the FCC had stepped in then to select a standard, it might have helped.

    Aside from the FCC's unwillingness to declare a standard, the single biggest problem was finding AM stereo radios. Set makers did not want to build radios capable of getting 2 or 4 AM Stereo standards. They wanted the issue settled by the FCC. Many of them weren't keen on building AM radios at all.

    Kahn's lawsuit against Motorola came in the late 80s, long after the FCC should have stepped in to declare a winner. By that point, it simply didn't matter. There were few AM stations doing music at that point. The FCC's decision in 1993 to make Motorola the standard was about a decade too late.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tested View Post
    I would take issue with blaming Mr. Kahn. The FCC and set makers are to blame. In 1980, the FCC selected an AM Stereo standard from Magnavox, only to recind it two years later after a ton of complaints from stations and set manufacturers.
    The timeline is wrong. We expected an FCC decision in 1977, when AM still had over half the listening. The FCC made a decision, which was immediately halted by Mr Kahn's lawsuit. It took 5 years to get to the "marketplace" decision, and then that was an effort by the FCC to prevent another suit by Mr Kahn.

    By 1982, three-quarters of the music listening was on FM. The game was over.

    By allowing the issue to be decided "by the market" with 4 competing systems, the FCC doomed the prospects of AM stereo.
    There were 5 competing systems, IIRC. I had confirmed order #1 with two of them for WQII were either of their systems to have been approved.

    By the time any system was allowed, I had ended my association with AM under the "lost cause" theory.

    Aside from the FCC's unwillingness to declare a standard, the single biggest problem was finding AM stereo radios. Set makers did not want to build radios capable of getting 2 or 4 AM Stereo standards. They wanted the issue settled by the FCC. Many of them weren't keen on building AM radios at all.
    That was not the reason at all. A multi-system chip was a breeze to make, but manufacturers correctly sensed that there was, by 1983, no interest in AM stereo as the music audience was gone.

    Kahn's lawsuit against Motorola came in the late 80s, long after the FCC should have stepped in to declare a winner. By that point, it simply didn't matter. There were few AM stations doing music at that point. The FCC's decision in 1993 to make Motorola the standard was about a decade too late.
    1993 was 15 years to late. The tipping point was 1977-1978, and Kahn's suit at that time delayed any system far to long to have been of any benefit to the AM band.
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by billyg View Post
    And I remember Motorola was forcing electronic corporations like Sony and Panasonic to buy their AM Stereo decoding chips. Many companies didn't want to to pay for them. So there were very few AM Stereo radios for sale when there should have been a huge flood of AM Stereo radios, boomboxes, receivers, car stereos, walkmans etc hitting the store shelves. The FCC should have forced Motorola to put that chip design in the public domain so any company could make them.
    The manufacturers saw that, by 1983, the opportunity for and interest in AM stereo had become minimal, and there would be no return on investment making radios nobody wanted.

    If you listened to music only on FM (as was the case with nearly everyone by 1983), why would you spend more to get a feature you did not have a need for?

    The FCC never mandated FM Stereo be in all radios. It never even mandated that FM be in all radios. So mandating AM stereo was very unlikely.
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