When KLIF 1190 Dallas, Tx. went STEREO 1977 - Page 3
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Thread: When KLIF 1190 Dallas, Tx. went STEREO 1977

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    The timeline is wrong. We expected an FCC decision in 1977, when AM still had over half the listening. The FCC made a decision, which was immediately halted by Mr Kahn's lawsuit. It took 5 years to get to the "marketplace" decision, and then that was an effort by the FCC to prevent another suit by Mr Kahn.
    .
    I don't want to sound argumentative with you, of all people, but my timeline is not wrong. It was 1980 when the FCC made the Magnavox decision. They had started "testing" about 1975. Technically there were 5 systems when the "marketplace" decision happened, but Belar dropped out almost immediately. I am unaware of any lawsuit by Mr. Kahn in the 70s, but know he filed one in the late 80s claiming Motorola's system did not meet FCC standards. If you recall, what was the lawsuit about in the 70s?

    Also, the ease of making a multi-system chip does not count for the cost of licensing the technology from the 4 or 5 companies competing to be the standard. It was expensive. That's why only one such radio was made. (sure wish I had one)

    10 or 15 years too late, the 1993 FCC decision was just too late for AM radio. I have studied AM Stereo for decades as part of my love of radio. I was acutely aware of every move made in the battles over it at the time it was happening. I have always wondered where the band would be today if it had managed to get a good stereo standard adopted back when most listeners were tuned in to AM. It amazes me that today only about 8-10% of listening in the DFW area is on the AM band. Would it be 20-30% if stereo had been adopted in the late 70s or early 80s? Probably not, but who knows.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by tested View Post
    I don't want to sound argumentative with you, of all people, but my timeline is not wrong. It was 1980 when the FCC made the Magnavox decision. They had started "testing" about 1975. Technically there were 5 systems when the "marketplace" decision happened, but Belar dropped out almost immediately. I am unaware of any lawsuit by Mr. Kahn in the 70s, but know he filed one in the late 80s claiming Motorola's system did not meet FCC standards. If you recall, what was the lawsuit about in the 70s?
    When the FCC made an initial decision on systems in the 1977-78 period, Kahn sued to have the proceeding halted as prejudicial. I was ready, having spent a considerable amount in mid-1977 to put in all stereo studio gear as well as a new "stereo" (2-channel) microwave system with full redundancy. We had hoped to be on in stereo, given the FCC's early indicators of the timetable, in Q1 of 1978 at the latest. We even had our agency, Badillo / Saatchi & Saatchi, prepare a multimedia ad campaign for the launch of stereo.

    Then the FCC delayed the proceedings, and in early 1978 Kahn sent a letter to the Commission detailing his objections to the 4 opposing systems. He soon coupled this with a legal inquiry (in other words, a threat of a suit) to further postpone the evaluation. The result was that the FCC dragged what, in mid-1977 should have been a rapid "inquiry" into an exercise in not getting into a battle. When they finally acted, Kahn filed actual objections.

    So Kahn's threats slowed the procedure down, and his actual filling added 3 more years to the proceeding, during which time most music listening and, more importantly, young adult music formats on AM, had disappeared.

    Also, the ease of making a multi-system chip does not count for the cost of licensing the technology from the 4 or 5 companies competing to be the standard. It was expensive. That's why only one such radio was made. (sure wish I had one)
    Had the implementation have occurred in 1978, manufacturers would have ignored the cost and simply passed it on to consumers who, at that time, would likely have seen a good price / value equation before AM music stations had disappeared in most of the popular formats.

    I have always wondered where the band would be today if it had managed to get a good stereo standard adopted back when most listeners were tuned in to AM. It amazes me that today only about 8-10% of listening in the DFW area is on the AM band. Would it be 20-30% if stereo had been adopted in the late 70s or early 80s? Probably not, but who knows.
    While in Dallas there is about 10% of all listening going to AM, in 18-49 the amount is around 8 shares, of which 2/3 goes to KTCK.

    The problem, overall, was timeliness. There was a window of opportunity to have an image of stereo = quality, but once the major format listeners had gone to FM, there was no way to get them back. I saw this in my market in 1979, where what was the biggest format appeared on FM, raising in just 90 days the FM share from around 14 to over 55 (with that one station getting as high as a 42 share). The window of opportunity slammed shut, and within a year there was nearly no AM music listening.
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  3. #23
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    Even if Kahn didn't gum things up, the FM horse was out of the barn and never to return. In the DFW market, AM Stereo couldn't do anything to improve the coverage area of most AM stations (only three could hit all metro survey counties after sunset, while just about all FM's could) As everyone knows, the Mighty 11~Ninety was 50kw during the day, but dropped to 5kw with 12 towers at night. YIKES! AM Stereo couldn't fix that problem.
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  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by DrAkbar View Post
    ...coverage area of most AM stations (only three could hit all metro survey counties after sunset...
    I assume you are referring to:
    KRQX (nee WFAA) 570--5 kw DA-N with it's big "butterfly" pattern
    WBAP 820--50 kw ND
    KRLD 1080--50 kw DA-N protecting only WTIC Hartford
    Save AM radio...kill I-CRAP.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldiesfan6479 View Post
    I assume you are referring to:
    KRQX (nee WFAA) 570--5 kw DA-N with it's big "butterfly" pattern
    WBAP 820--50 kw ND
    KRLD 1080--50 kw DA-N protecting only WTIC Hartford
    Yup. Ancient Modulation stations really took it on the chin when Arbitron combined the Dallas and Ft Worth books. KBOX was competitive in Dallas, but not so in Ft Worth; KFJZ was competitive in Ft Worth, but not so much in Dallas. Combine the markets, and both stations suffered. Most FM's didn't have that problem. McLendon was wise to sell KLIF in 1971, two years before the two markets were combined.
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  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    When the FCC made an initial decision on systems in the 1977-78 period, Kahn sued to have the proceeding halted as prejudicial. I was ready, having spent a considerable amount in mid-1977 to put in all stereo studio gear as well as a new "stereo" (2-channel) microwave system with full redundancy. We had hoped to be on in stereo, given the FCC's early indicators of the timetable, in Q1 of 1978 at the latest. We even had our agency, Badillo / Saatchi & Saatchi, prepare a multimedia ad campaign for the launch of stereo.

    Then the FCC delayed the proceedings, and in early 1978 Kahn sent a letter to the Commission detailing his objections to the 4 opposing systems. He soon coupled this with a legal inquiry (in other words, a threat of a suit) to further postpone the evaluation. The result was that the FCC dragged what, in mid-1977 should have been a rapid "inquiry" into an exercise in not getting into a battle. When they finally acted, Kahn filed actual objections.

    So Kahn's threats slowed the procedure down, and his actual filling added 3 more years to the proceeding, during which time most music listening and, more importantly, young adult music formats on AM, had disappeared.



    Had the implementation have occurred in 1978, manufacturers would have ignored the cost and simply passed it on to consumers who, at that time, would likely have seen a good price / value equation before AM music stations had disappeared in most of the popular formats.



    While in Dallas there is about 10% of all listening going to AM, in 18-49 the amount is around 8 shares, of which 2/3 goes to KTCK.

    The problem, overall, was timeliness. There was a window of opportunity to have an image of stereo = quality, but once the major format listeners had gone to FM, there was no way to get them back. I saw this in my market in 1979, where what was the biggest format appeared on FM, raising in just 90 days the FM share from around 14 to over 55 (with that one station getting as high as a 42 share). The window of opportunity slammed shut, and within a year there was nearly no AM music listening.
    This is why I really didn't want to seem argumentative with you. I had never heard of the legal issues in the late 70s. In all of the reading of newspapers and trade magazines at the time, it never came up. Clearly had I been in the business at the time, as you were, I would have known. Great information. Thank you.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by tested View Post
    Also, the ease of making a multi-system chip does not count for the cost of licensing the technology from the 4 or 5 companies competing to be the standard. It was expensive. That's why only one such radio was made. (sure wish I had one)
    What model radio would that be?
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  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    The manufacturers saw that, by 1983, the opportunity for and interest in AM stereo had become minimal, and there would be no return on investment making radios nobody wanted.

    If you listened to music only on FM (as was the case with nearly everyone by 1983), why would you spend more to get a feature you did not have a need for?

    The FCC never mandated FM Stereo be in all radios. It never even mandated that FM be in all radios. So mandating AM stereo was very unlikely.
    If you lived in the southwest in the 80's like I did, there were still big and medium market AM country, adult contemporary and R&B stations still alive in 1983 that AM stereo might have helped. Plus the big electronics stories I remember of 1983 were the Compact Disc and maybe VHS-Beta video recorders than radios and stereos.

  9. #29
    I don't think No one cared for AM Stereo in 1983

    Everyone jumped to FM by that time

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