WOMC FM
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Thread: WOMC FM

  1. #1

    WOMC FM

    They are at a 190 thousand watts. Is that the most powerful FM on the radio dial in the United States?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by 34james View Post
    They are at a 190 thousand watts. Is that the most powerful FM on the radio dial in the United States?
    WBCT in Grand Rapids has 320,000 w.
    WMC in Memphis is 300,000.

    WSRW Kent, MI, at 265,000.
    WSLQ Roanoke and WRVQ Richmond both 200,000 and then WOMC.
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  3. #3
    You also have to consider the HAAT of the station. WOMC does broadcast at 190,000 watts, but given its 110m HAAT, it's not even close to having one of the widest coverages for FM radio in America. In fact, when one measures coverage with 60dBu, WOMC only reaches about 6km more compared to a regular class B station (with 50kW/150m HAAT). Even WBCT, which broadcasts at 320,000 watts, only reaches 78.691 km at 60 dBu due to its antenna being at 238m HAAT; that would make this station broadcast equivalent to a Class C/C0 station with 100kW and a 385.56m HAAT.

    Measurements like this can be done via:

    https://www.fcc.gov/media/radio/fm-a...agation-curves

    Also, an article mentioning stations with largest 60 dBu contours (which includes stations like WHOM, WSLQ, several LA Mt. Wilson stations, etc):

    http://jeff560.tripod.com/fm-max.html

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post
    m
    WBCT in Grand Rapids has 320,000 w.
    WMC in Memphis is 300,000.

    WSRW Kent, MI, at 265,000.
    WSLQ Roanoke and WRVQ Richmond both 200,000 and then WOMC.
    Thats called doing your homework.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radio Radio Listener View Post
    You also have to consider the HAAT of the station.
    Certainly a good point, as height and power are the determining factors in calculating coverage.

    I once had to drop the power on an FM operating from a site approximately 13,000' AMSL as, even with beam tilt, the station "worked" better with less multipath at a lower than originally built power.

    At one point, superpower KPFK had horrible coverage of parts of LA due to the use of something like a 12 bay antenna at 2,800' HAAT. Despite 110,000 watts of ERP, they had loads of bad zones.
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  6. #6
    There are a few superpowered Canadian FMs as well....

    CJKR Winnipeg 310,000 watts

    CKOI Montreal 307,000 watts

    CBW-FM Winnipeg 160,000 watts

    The market with the most superpowered FM stations is clearly LA. All but a few LA's FM stations operate way above the Class B maximum of apx. 50,000 watts at 500 feet. (Southern California is in Class B.) And many break the Class C rule of 100,000 watts at about 2000 feet, for more rural parts of the country.

    Even a station like KOST in LA with only 11,500 watts has a height more than 3000 feet above average terrain. That's much better than 100,000 watts at 2000 feet. Many LA FM stations are on Mount Wilson, high above the city and its suburbs. That's why they are heard well into the Inland Empire, Riverside and San Bernardino. If they were Class B, that part of Southern California wouldn't get the LA FM stations.

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