What's going on at WOGL? - Page 5
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Thread: What's going on at WOGL?

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunsmoke View Post
    The question I have is, why do remote towns and villages, some in middle backwoods America, have full time AM and FM translators playing classic oldies and country from the 50's and 60's, some so obscure they were only played when first came out.. The audience they are reachng doesn't know the difference between Frankie Avalon, Anette or Fabian from Sam Smith lol. Why doesn't the big cities on the east coast where the residence grew up on this music, know every word of every song and embraced it not have a local outlet for it. Makes no sense, but signals like WFAT, WKCE, KFXM and many, many, others, some in one horse towns are playing this and all the floundering AM's in NYC and Philly won't budge.
    Those super-oldies stations that succeed are in smallish markets where there is practically no agency business. They sell to local advertisers who evaluate media based on service and the cash register and don't use ratings books to buy.

    The larger the market, the more agency business there is. Agencies place ad buys according to their client's marketing department's specifications, generally meaning that they don't ever target folks over 55. So, in a major market, you won't see major stations programming 50's and 60's and even earlier 70's.

    The secondary answer is that many of those little town stations just don't know any better and there is limited competition to prove how wrong they are when they play some of those amply forgotten songs. The owners think that is "variety" while listeners think it's just "songs I don't like". But they don't have ratings and they generally don't have good programming skills. Occasionally it works in the WLNG fashion, but generally it's just bad radio.
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  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by BJSteigner View Post
    WOGL should go back to the Oldies format...<Now that's a REAL CLASSIC HITS station. 50, 60s, and 70s would be Classic Hits. 80s, 90s, and today...Adult Hits.
    You are redefining standardized industry format descriptors.

    Adult Hits: "Jack" format and sound-alikes. A mile wide, an inch deep.

    Classic Hits: 80's based pop / contemporary gold.

    Oldies: 60's based pop gold.

    Agencies buy the first two if the numbers are good. Agencies do not buy Oldies, as the numbers are never good in the target demos nearly every advertiser looks for.
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  3. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post
    [SIZE="3]
    The secondary answer is that many of those little town stations just don't know any better and there is limited competition to prove how wrong they are when they play some of those amply forgotten songs. The owners think that is "variety" while listeners think it's just "songs I don't like". But they don't have ratings and they generally don't have good programming skills. Occasionally it works in the WLNG fashion, but generally it's just bad radio.[/SIZE]
    The third part of that answer is that small towns are literally dying. Rural areas aren’t getting younger. You have to play to the population that still lives there.

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by pab View Post
    A person who graduated from high school in 1979 would have been born (on average, give or take a year of course) in 1961.
    You are describing me on both counts (I was born in the summer of 1961).

    Someone who graduated high school in 1955 ("Rock Around the Clock" topped the charts, commencing the current rock/pop era) would have been born in 1937.
    Here you are describing my parents on both counts (both were born in the summer of '37 and were HS classmates)

    And all three of us went to HS in Chester, PA (the private school where I went to HS moved to Media three weeks before I graduated), and we were all born and raised in Delco.

    Thank you for recognizing our demographic.

    ixnay

  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    Those super-oldies stations that succeed are in smallish markets where there is practically no agency business. They sell to local advertisers who evaluate media based on service and the cash register and don't use ratings books to buy.

    The larger the market, the more agency business there is. Agencies place ad buys according to their client's marketing department's specifications, generally meaning that they don't ever target folks over 55. So, in a major market, you won't see major stations programming 50's and 60's and even earlier 70's.

    The secondary answer is that many of those little town stations just don't know any better and there is limited competition to prove how wrong they are when they play some of those amply forgotten songs. The owners think that is "variety" while listeners think it's just "songs I don't like". But they don't have ratings and they generally don't have good programming skills. Occasionally it works in the WLNG fashion, but generally it's just bad radio.
    WMID Atlantic City seems to operate much the same way (of course they carry Rush too).

    ixnay

  6. #46
    It varies on depending where you live,

    In some markets, at least one station in your local area might take a few chances by playing deep cuts/nuggets every hour alongside the usual hits and have a playlist of maybe 888-950 songs, whereas the other stations have a much tighter playlist and feature only 450-500 songs. In LA, KRTH used to be an oldies station with a playlist focusing on hits from 1955-1979 with a heavy emphasis on the British Invasion/Motown hits. In Dallas/Fort Worth, KLUV 98.7 HD-2 also used to be an oldies station just like KRTH with the same format, but KLUV 98.7 HD-2 seemed to go deeper and played a good handful of 50's, 60's and 70's hits that were not heard on KRTH. It seems certain songs score better in Texas than California. What's up with that?

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by ATSFGuy View Post

    In some markets, at least one station in your local area might take a few chances by playing deep cuts/nuggets every hour alongside the usual hits and have a playlist of maybe 888-950 songs,
    It's a lot easier to do that with an HD station than a main signal. And the ratings difference between the two explains why

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