What's going on at WOGL? - Page 4
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 47

Thread: What's going on at WOGL?

  1. #31
    What "Classic Soul Christmas tracks" did they play? I figured that subset would be avoided with WDAS still on the air.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by polaris View Post
    Well, in my opinion, the "corporate standard" is horrid. What ever happened to a radio station sounding individual, sounding like it's city? Now, radio just sounds like the same old same old, no matter what station I listen to. It's really distasteful; what are America's radio programmers thinking?
    They are thinking, what can I do to stay employed and keep the boss happy...

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    WOGL had the best average over the 12 regular books of any year of the last 6 or 7. The average for the whole year as a 7.9.

    Their biggest issue is that they are averaging around 10th in 25-54, and getting to the point that the audience is way too old.
    Why are 25 year olds even in the same group as 54 year olds? I don't see them having much in common, musically. When I was 25, I definitely had a different taste in music than my Mom's generation

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Fakeem View Post
    Why are 25 year olds even in the same group as 54 year olds? I don't see them having much in common, musically.
    This has come up before. It's a sales demographic created by advertisers, not a music demographic. Usually there are subgroups within that larger group that an advertiser wants to target.

  5. #35
    Moderator/Co-Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    37,412
    Quote Originally Posted by Fakeem View Post
    Why are 25 year olds even in the same group as 54 year olds? I don't see them having much in common, musically. When I was 25, I definitely had a different taste in music than my Mom's generation
    As BigA says, this is a time buying demographic. Advertisers, in their vast majority want to reach people in that age range. They know that to use radio, they often have to buy several stations deep to cover the younger, older and middle parts of the demographic.

    Stations target portions of the demo. A few, like WBEB, cover the entire demo with strong listening in 25-34, 35-44 and 45-54. Others reach different segments and are still attractive to advertisers.

    Many advertisers are more specific in targeting, depending on the product. Beer, the classic example, targets men. So they usually buy Men 25-54. Or men 25-44. Or...

    In some markets, you see very specific gender, age and ethnicity as a target: Hispanic Females English Dominant 25-44. In LA, that's nearly as many people than the entire market total in the lower Top 100 markets.

    Even 25-54 is not a "done deal" in all cases. Most ethnic buys target 18-49 (just like TV) and there are definitely 18-34 buys, too. But there are very few 55+ or teen buys.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, Billboard, Cash Box, R&R, Record World, Music & Media, Audio, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, Popular Electronics, Studio Sound, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  6. #36
    WOGL should go back to the Oldies format...<Now that's a REAL CLASSIC HITS station. 50, 60s, and 70s would be Classic Hits. 80s, 90s, and today...Adult Hits.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by BJSteigner View Post
    WOGL should go back to the Oldies format...<Now that's a REAL CLASSIC HITS station. 50, 60s, and 70s would be Classic Hits. 80s, 90s, and today...Adult Hits.
    Yeah, um...no, they shouldn’t.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by BJSteigner View Post
    WOGL should go back to the Oldies format...<Now that's a REAL CLASSIC HITS station. 50, 60s, and 70s would be Classic Hits. 80s, 90s, and today...Adult Hits.
    This will never happen.

    The guiding line for the music someone identifies most with is what was playing when they were in high school.

    A person who graduated from high school in 1979 would have been born (on average, give or take a year of course) in 1961. Someone who graduated high school in 1955 ("Rock Around the Clock" topped the charts, commencing the current rock/pop era) would have been born in 1937.

    So the "oldies" format you propose and some stations are still trying today would be bringing in listeners age 57-81. Firmly out of the demographic most advertisers want to reach and, literally, dying out. This is where the "standards" format was a decade ago and how many standards stations do you see anywhere, let alone in a top 10 market?

    Back when Oldies was at its peak in the late 80's, and CBS was really driving it with stations like WOGL, the rule of thumb was "1955 through 10 years ago." In 1987 this gave you a target demographic of 28-50, exactly who advertisers wanted to reach.

    The modern equivalent of CBS's oldies format would be music from 1978 through 2003, or 15 years ago. (I think 10 years is a little too current for today's tastes.)

    In addition, it would be imaged like a pop station from around 1984 (think Hot Hits WCAU-FM) and probably have a "morning zoo" style morning show. This would be consistent with when WCBS went Oldies and WOGL launched; the two were programmed to sound like a station out of the late 50's/early 60's with imaging reminiscent of that sound and talent like Hy Lit and Cousin Brucie. It's the sound the target demographic remembers from when they were most into radio.

    Oldies as we know it is dying and there will be no resurrection.

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    old city philadelphia
    Posts
    495
    The question I have is, why do remote towns and villages, some in middle backwoods America, have full time AM and FM translators playing classic oldies and country from the 50's and 60's, some so obscure they were only played when first came out.. The audience they are reachng doesn't know the difference between Frankie Avalon, Anette or Fabian from Sam Smith lol. Why doesn't the big cities on the east coast where the residence grew up on this music, know every word of every song and embraced it not have a local outlet for it. Makes no sense, but signals like WFAT, WKCE, KFXM and many, many, others, some in one horse towns are playing this and all the floundering AM's in NYC and Philly won't budge.

  10. #40
    Different ad buying. Vanity/pet projects. Different competition. Other content.

    Mix and match among those and other factors. It’s apples and oranges—to put it mildly—trying to compare. Quite apart from moldy oldies, there are some fun small-town stations I enjoy when traveling, but I’d never suggest that because it works “there” that it would work here, with agency buys, ample competition and a different audience.

    But that’s been explained before. And those who don’t want to accept it will simply continue to pose the same argument disguised as a question.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  




     
Our Conferences
Useful Contacts
Community


Contact Us