Breaking: iHeart agrees to recognize union, offer BZ jobs (Herald) - Page 4
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Thread: Breaking: iHeart agrees to recognize union, offer BZ jobs (Herald)

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Kaimbridge View Post
    Well, actually three employees—unless one is working double overtime, 7 days a week—and that is a healthy chunk of change: $12×24hr.s×365.25days = $105,192yr!
    I meant "cheaper by the hour".

    There is a common misconception that the power bill is a significant part of the budget of even larger market radio stations. In the case of WBZ, we are talking about a station that bills a coupla' million a month, so the $8,000 transmitter power bill is not a significant expense. Only if you are running 50 kw with an old high-level plate modulated transmitter in a market like Bismarck, ND, is the power bill "major"... as demonstrated this year by a 50 kw station dropping power to a more reasonable level for market coverage.
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eli Polonsky View Post
    WBZ is quite directional. They don't send much power eastward into the ocean. Due to the pattern, it doesn't come in as well as you'd expect on outer Cape Cod, I've heard phasing artifacts there.
    While the signal is pushed on the 270° radial and nulled on 90°, the pattern is very, very simple and uses just two towers. Compare to the costs of maintaining the much more critical and complex WRKO and WEEI systems, or the three pattern, four tower WMEX array and the WBZ system is a breeze.
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  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    Revenues are diminishing very slowly. In fact, the major reductions in revenue occurred during the peak of the recession and following the introduction of the PPM. And those affected the whole market.

    Studio moving expenses are a capital expense, amortized over a useful life.

    A 50 kw transmitter and all its gear probably use around $12 an hour in electricity. In other words, cheaper than the lowest paid employee by a great deal. In fact, the technical expense (power, maintenance, labor, etc.) for a 5 kw highly directional station is likely more than that for WBZ.
    David,

    Just to clarify: I did not mean to imply I was agreeing with the poster to whom I was responding. All I meant was that IF what said poster wrote was indeed true, then why would iHeart bother to take on this heavy burden of rapidly declining revenues, significant capital expense for moves, and a huge electric bill? Don't they have enough troubles of their own?

    Fortunately, at least for WBZ's sake, the dire situation described by the other poster is not all doom-and-gloom.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    While the signal is pushed on the 270° radial and nulled on 90°, the pattern is very, very simple and uses just two towers. Compare to the costs of maintaining the much more critical and complex WRKO and WEEI systems, or the three pattern, four tower WMEX array and the WBZ system is a breeze.
    You are, once again, correct.

    A two-tower array with a cardioid pattern which blows out heavy flames inland, as opposed to seaward, is fairly easy to implement.

    In 1964, as a young pup, I wrote to the WBZ CE and asked where their transmitter was and if they were directional. I received a letter back from him - I might still have it in my collection of radio goodies - stating that "(WBZ) AM was directional only to prevent loss of signal over the ocean." Simple enough reason, simple enough pattern.

    OTOH, the patterns for WRKO or WEEI-AM or WMEX have to be way more complex.

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