WSMR 89.1 Power Reduction - Page 2
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Thread: WSMR 89.1 Power Reduction

  1. #11
    Thanks for your investigative work, drt. Perchance, do you know the temporary ERP of 89.1?

    Unfortunately, WSMR can ill afford to lose any listeners.
    Plugged into the electric radio

  2. #12

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    I forgot to ask the engineer that very question in my first email; I emailed again and will have to see if I included that question. Im thinking based on the signal Im receiving in SP, that its probably about the same as when they were having problems in the beginning and IIRC that was somewhere around 33,000 watts ERP; but that is just a guess.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by drt View Post
    I’m thinking based on the signal I’m receiving in SP, that it’s probably about the same as when they were having problems in the beginning and IIRC that was somewhere around 33,000 watts ERP...
    2db is not the end of the world.
    Swiching from stereo to mono is 18db greater.
    Ai4i has Always Been on the Trailing Edge of Technology!

  4. #14
    Apparently the problem began in August when an electrical problem caused the antenna to burn out. Last month, WSMR was granted an STA that expires on 17 April 2018.
    Plugged into the electric radio

  5. #15

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    Can anyone tell me why WSMR is begging for money
    "to improve their signal and bring classical music to more people"?
    Do they have another translator in mind or perhaps raising the one they have?
    Ai4i has Always Been on the Trailing Edge of Technology!

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Kemosabe View Post
    Apparently the problem began in August when an electrical problem caused the antenna to burn out. Last month, WSMR was granted an STA that expires on 17 April 2018.
    How does an antenna "burn out" due to an electrical problem?
    "I don't practice what I preach because I'm not the sort of person I'm preaching to."

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by wlsl View Post
    How does an antenna "burn out" due to an electrical problem?
    That's how WSMR described it in its STA application.
    Plugged into the electric radio

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by ai4i View Post
    Can anyone tell me why WSMR is begging for money
    "to improve their signal and bring classical music to more people"?
    Do they have another translator in mind or perhaps raising the one they have?
    Or is it simply to fund their new antenna to restore full power to their 89.1 signal?
    Plugged into the electric radio

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by wlsl View Post
    How does an antenna "burn out" due to an electrical problem?
    The causes can be many.

    An FM antenna is fed by a coaxial cable which has a hot (center conductor) and cold (outside sheath) side, separated by a dialectric, such as a plastic, spacers and compressed gas.

    The antenna is fed by the cable, and is made, usually, of hollow copper or even aluminum.

    If hit by lightening, usually the charge goes down the tower to ground. But in some cases, it can perforate the antenna and the coax, and then the RF energy (the signal) arcs over and burns the insides of the antenna and cable.

    Or a failure of an O-ring or rusting bolts can cause air to get into the coax or the antenna... moisture condenses and the RF energy arcs and burns holes in the antenna or the coax.

    Loss of gas pressure or failure to keep the coax dehumidified can lead to arcing, too.

    Most broadcast coax looks like pipe, not like the stuff the cable company puts in your home. It can have the diameter of big water pipes in high power facilities... as big around as your coffee cup.

    This is a quite simplified explanation, just to give you an idea of what can happen when you stick an antenna and, often, hundreds of feet of coax up in the air.
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  10. #20
    A couple of things happened, the result was the bottom few bays burned up. The antenna was removed to be completely rebuilt on the ground. The original ERI from Green Cove that was originally used when WSMR moved to Nokomis is back on the air. The ERP shouldn't be changed a whole lot but the ERI is not as high in elevation. As we all know height is might in the flat land. Due to crew schedules (from Hurricane restoration) it has been difficult getting the Dielectric antenna back up. The antenna never lost pressurization, and there was no indicator anything was wrong until a few days beforehand when the transmitter shut off with no warning. I can tell you from personally seeing the damage it was too late by then.

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