How To Make Broadcast Towers More Bird-Friendly: Turn Off Some Lights
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Thread: How To Make Broadcast Towers More Bird-Friendly: Turn Off Some Lights

  1. #1

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    Question How To Make Broadcast Towers More Bird-Friendly: Turn Off Some Lights

    http://www.npr.org/2017/01/24/510811...ff-some-lights

    Crazy to think that 7 million birds hit TV/Radio and Cell towers a year.

  2. #2
    Personally, I'd rather have them airplane-friendly than bird-friendly.

    For every bird that has the bad luck to hit a radio tower, likely hundreds are
    chopped-up by wind farms.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by RadioPatrol View Post
    http://www.npr.org/2017/01/24/510811...ff-some-lights

    Crazy to think that 7 million birds hit TV/Radio and Cell towers a year.
    In 58 years in radio, including many as transmitter engineer, I have never seen a dead bird near a tower. And I do not know anyone who has.
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  4. #4
    My father was an Air Force radar technician. He says that seagulls would routinely come swooping in too close
    to the towers and drop to the ground. Half an hour later they'd still be sizzling on the inside.

    Of course radar is basically microwave. Not the same thing as a chance encounter with a freestanding FM tower.

  5. #5
    I have birds crash into my house. My office has a big picture window and a crow crashed into it. A couple have died, but most just get stunned, pick up, and fly away.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    In 58 years in radio, including many as transmitter engineer, I have never seen a dead bird near a tower. And I do not know anyone who has.
    Yes the claims are complete and total BS. With the numbers tossed around by supposed advocates claiming radio and TV towers kill birds, given all the years, I would have been up to my knees in dead birds by now. Quite to the contrary, in over 30 years I've never seen a single dead bird around any tower sites.

  7. #7
    There's how many towers in the country? A few hundred thousand? 7 million birds a year is a lot of bird strikes on each and every tower, every year.

    Now, would I really see every starling? Probably not. But if there's one on my tower every 2-3 weeks, I'm pretty sure I'd notice once in a while...
    "Its music what makes a radio station, and at Live FM, we play the last music around."
    After receiving that copy, I quit the VO industry.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelly A View Post
    Yes the claims are complete and total BS. With the numbers tossed around by supposed advocates claiming radio and TV towers kill birds, given all the years, I would have been up to my knees in dead birds by now. Quite to the contrary, in over 30 years I've never seen a single dead bird around any tower sites.
    Your observation is the most valid I can think of as you have likely visited more different sites more often than I have.

    But during the roughly two decades when I either had a studio / office facility at the tower site or visited a site nearly every day, I never saw a bird lying dead beneath the tower or the guy wires. And that includes locations as different as at 10,000 to 13,000 feet AMSL in the Andes, at near sea level at Guayaquil and Miami, in tropical forests in Puerto Rico and in the desert in Phoenix to name a few. All had one thing in common: no dead birds.

    I would say the chances of finding a dead bird at the base of a tower is about the same as the chance of finding a thrill-seeking tower climber in the same state. I never had one of those, either, although I have been through a couple of near misses. That proves that the birds are smarter than a lot of humans.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    I have birds crash into my house. My office has a big picture window and a crow crashed into it. A couple have died, but most just get stunned, pick up, and fly away.
    You need to put flashing holiday lights around your picture windows. The problem is that the red ones may give passersby the wrong impression.
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  10. #10
    I have seen/had dead birds at the transmitter site. At the bottom of the power pole they landed on and got across two phases. Had at least 5 dead crows on the ground and totally hosed set of fuse holders on the pole. Couple of the birds were blown apart real good. Had another single bird take a fuse out at another site. I see more birds die from the power lines.

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