Sam And Lissa FIRED
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Thread: Sam And Lissa FIRED

  1. #1

    Sam And Lissa FIRED

    KBAY's Christmas Bonus and Surprise:
    Blow up the Sam and Lissa Morning Show. What a way to end 2016- Throw them into the unemployment line!!!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1069_KIFR View Post
    KBAY's Christmas Bonus and Surprise:
    Blow up the Sam and Lissa Morning Show. What a way to end 2016- Throw them into the unemployment line!!!
    Unfortunately, many talent changes in large markets take place during the PPM "Holiday" survey period which is amply ignored by media buyers. In addition, listeners are in a period of less predictable behavior so changes are not noticed nor felt as deeply.

    Very sad for the talent, but it is the way the game is played.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
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  3. #3
    New owner. New PD. New format. It happens.

  4. #4
    That means the morning drive slot will be voicetracked until after the New Year! And maybe even beyond!

  5. #5
    Actually according to Sal Pizzaro at the Mercury News, Lissa was terminated but Sam had decided months ago to retire at the end of this year due to health issues. What I find refreshing about this is that KBAY general manager John Levitt let the two do a final show to say goodbye to their listeners. That's something talent rarely gets to do. http://www.mercurynews.com/2016/12/1...weet-farewell/

  6. #6

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    Unbelievable! I hope KISQ takes note and hires Lissa. I'm curious what format KBAY will acquire after Christmas.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by xkxrx View Post
    Actually according to Sal Pizzaro at the Mercury News, Lissa was terminated but Sam had decided months ago to retire at the end of this year due to health issues. What I find refreshing about this is that KBAY general manager John Levitt let the two do a final show to say goodbye to their listeners. That's something talent rarely gets to do. http://www.mercurynews.com/2016/12/1...weet-farewell/
    All too many times it seems that employer and employee in radioland are at odds with each other and there is a severe lack of trust between the two. I would think that an otherwise "good" on-air employee would be allowed to say goodbye to his/her fans if only to continue the good relationship the station has with its listeners. I can think of very few other events that would turn loyal listeners into dial-switchers than the sudden and unexplained disappearance of long time talent.

    I can clearly remember that weekend daypart in 1966 when KEWB flipped from rock to talk. They gave each daytime jock the ability to say goodbye and play some of their favorite songs in their abbreviated last show(s). Although it was a major shock to those of us who didn't know the change was coming it was the mature way to go and should be the standard any time a major change in the station or talent happens. I mean, we all know that change is inevitable but it doesn't have to be an in your face event.
    Illegitimi non carborundum

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post
    All too many times it seems that employer and employee in radioland are at odds with each other and there is a severe lack of trust between the two. I would think that an otherwise "good" on-air employee would be allowed to say goodbye to his/her fans if only to continue the good relationship the station has with its listeners. I can think of very few other events that would turn loyal listeners into dial-switchers than the sudden and unexplained disappearance of long time talent.

    I can clearly remember that weekend daypart in 1966 when KEWB flipped from rock to talk. They gave each daytime jock the ability to say goodbye and play some of their favorite songs in their abbreviated last show(s). Although it was a major shock to those of us who didn't know the change was coming it was the mature way to go and should be the standard any time a major change in the station or talent happens. I mean, we all know that change is inevitable but it doesn't have to be an in your face event.
    There is a big difference between changing formats and letting go a particular staff member.

    In radio, people are generally let go for performance issues such as low ratings, disciplinary causes or other character related matters. Those are not people that the station wants to maintain a "good relationship" with and they represent a big danger in terms of performing a "swan song" once they know they have been fired... right down to potentially endangering the license.

    In today's radio, the other main reason for firing is costs. Fewer live on-air staffers, more voice tracking. People who become unemployed this way are understandably bitter or angry. Saying "goodbye" is generally an opportunity to express their feelings about the company.

    Even when someone leaves for another job, it's often because they did not like the station, the PD, the manager or the owner. I've been in two situations where I shudder at the way the station ownership treated people, and could have ranted for an hour about it. But, instead, I just moved on. Still, given the chance, I would have said things I would have later regretted.

    And today, that's why most companies have a rule about someone who is let go clearing the building immediately,generally under supervision. We have all heard enough stories from the "old days" about someone opening the board in the production studio and taking a wiz in it or bulk erasing all the music and commercials for us to have any other position.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, RCA Broadcast News, Television Magazine, Radio Annual, Radio News, Sponsor, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, M Street Directory, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post
    [FONT="Microsoft Sans Serif"][SIZE="3"]

    There is a big difference between changing formats and letting go a particular staff member.

    In radio, people are generally let go for performance issues such as low ratings, disciplinary causes or other character related matters. Those are not people that the station wants to maintain a "good relationship" with and they represent a big danger in terms of performing a "swan song" once they know they have been fired... right down to potentially endangering the license.
    I understand that difference which is why I used the term "good employee". The same issues hold true outside the radio industry when less-than-satisfactory people are let go.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post
    [FONT="Microsoft Sans Serif"][SIZE="3"]In today's radio, the other main reason for firing is costs. Fewer live on-air staffers, more voice tracking. People who become unemployed this way are understandably bitter or angry. Saying "goodbye" is generally an opportunity to express their feelings about the company.
    Unlike most other careers I would think anyone getting into the radio business over the past 50 years would understand they will not be employed at one particular station forever. Turnover is a recognized fact of life in any profession where personality is such a large part of the job.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post
    [FONT="Microsoft Sans Serif"][SIZE="3"]Even when someone leaves for another job, it's often because they did not like the station, the PD, the manager or the owner. I've been in two situations where I shudder at the way the station ownership treated people, and could have ranted for an hour about it. But, instead, I just moved on. Still, given the chance, I would have said things I would have later regretted.
    It seems there are just tons of stories out there by former air talent (and engineers) about cheapskate owners. I can't recall that kind of assessment in any other industry. Must be a reason.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post
    And today, that's why most companies have a rule about someone who is let go clearing the building immediately,generally under supervision. We have all heard enough stories from the "old days" about someone opening the board in the production studio and taking a wiz in it or bulk erasing all the music and commercials for us to have any other position.
    I can understand the position particularly where the employee has access to trade secrets or other proprietary data - especially at a public company where senior management is held responsible for trade or security breaches. Still, it is a kick in the teeth to the loyal employee who has done their very best over a long period of time and has never had a hint of unsatisfactory performance. The only people I let go and physically walked out were contractors (company policy). I found if I could not trust a permanent hire they would not have been there long enough anyway.
    Illegitimi non carborundum

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post
    All too many times it seems that employer and employee in radioland are at odds with each other and there is a severe lack of trust between the two.
    It depends on the "employee." In the case of major market talent, which is what we're talking about here, they're typically not standard employees. They are independent contract workers, which means they're not necessarily under the employee umbrella. A lot of talent do that because they can make more money, and have more independence from internal management. It's a relationship that's similar to major contract athletes. Certainly in a lot of major markets like San Francisco, there's also the union involved. I don't have to explain the relationship between union and management. That's been somewhat adversarial for over 100 years.

    Having said that, you grew up at a time when SOME radio stations were run differently. Until they weren't. One of my favorite stories about San Francisco radio was the Big Daddy, Big Tom Donohue. He was no doubt a legend in the city, who helped promote The Beatles 1966 concert in Candlestick Park. Not long after that, Big Tom grew tired of the music policy at KYA, and sought out a place where he could play some of the more underground music that was exploding in San Francisco. He managed to find a low rated small FM station, KMPX, and talked the owner into letting him hire his own staff and play whatever he wanted. It turned out to be a great success. Unfortunately the owner got a little greedy (and so did Tom), so one day Tom took his staff over to KSAN, and the rest is history. It was no doubt an "in your face event." But that's one example of the relationship that exists between radio talent and ownership.
    Last edited by TheBigA; 12-18-2016 at 03:00 PM.

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