Why don't we see certain shows in syndication? - Page 4
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Thread: Why don't we see certain shows in syndication?

  1. #31

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    Maybe it was just me, but after that epic send-off to "Newhart" with psychologist Bob waking up from a dream next to Suzanne Pleshette realizing the entire series was a dream, I wasn't all that interested in the reruns. Dumb I realize but I wonder if that hurt the syndication effort (of course it was all fiction).


    Quote Originally Posted by onairb2014 View Post
    I recall 'Newhart' had a short run in syndication in about 1986 or '87. While the series as a whole has been regarded very highly by pop culture writers in the last 20 years or so, when 'Newhart' first went into off-network reruns, it may have suffered a bit in comparison with the '70s 'Bob Newhart Show'. On the other haand, 'Newhart' was still doing well on CBS at that point. Maybe the reruns were a little too 'fresh'?

    Another '80s hit that basically went nowhere in syndication was 'The Cosby Show'. Long before Cosby's personal life sank him, and this series, without a trace, 'The Cosby Show' made news for a lucrative contract for the rights to reruns of the first few seasons, But within a few months, viewers were tired of the older episodes...and not long after, the still-sizable NBC audience began to decline, as well.

  2. #32
    It not so much about the number of seasons as the number of episodes. The Munsters, The Addams Family, Gilligan's Island, Star Trek and many others lasted only 2 or 3 seasons, yet were all widely syndicated. Nowadays, with all of the stations seeking content, lower rated but longer lasting shows are appearing as part of "Classic TV" lineups. In years past, I doubt I would have seen shows like "My Mother The Car", "Car 54, Where Are You", and plenty of others that have been broadcast in the last 10-15 years, but had short shelf lives. In fact, I've seen a number of one season "classic" shows on tv lately. My guess is that those networks are finding that shows that were cancelled for low ratings are now looking acceptable when a show in today's environment can pull less than a 2.0 and still be considered a hit, let alone profitable.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by KeithE4 View Post
    That's probably why old black-and-white "fossils" like I Love Lucy, The Andy Griffith Show (thru 1964-65), and The Honeymooners did so well for so many decades.
    Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, being astute enough to foresee the day when reruns would be a lucrative business, deliberately wrote and shot I Love Lucy in such a manner as to avoid dating it in any way.

    They were astoundingly successful. Those episodes are now over sixty years old.
    The world has changed tremendously, and the role of women in our society has evolved exponentially. But those shows still hold up amazingly well. People can still relate to them.

    Whereas you can look at a rerun of Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In and the context for the humor is almost completely gone.
    Last edited by FreddyE1977; 11-30-2016 at 02:27 PM. Reason: line spacing

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by FreddyE1977 View Post
    Whereas you can look at a rerun of Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In and the context for the humor is almost completely gone.
    Laugh-In was intended from the beginning to be nothing but topical humor - mostly societal and political. Much like the stuff Bob Hope did on his shows.

    It's too bad those guys are all gone now because the current political environment would have provided them with unlimited material.
    Illegitimi non carborundum

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by gr8oldies View Post
    Maybe it was just me, but after that epic send-off to "Newhart" with psychologist Bob waking up from a dream next to Suzanne Pleshette realizing the entire series was a dream, I wasn't all that interested in the reruns. Dumb I realize but I wonder if that hurt the syndication effort (of course it was all fiction).


    On that note, "Who's The Boss?" was supposed to have a clear-cut "Tony and Angela get married and live happily ever after" final episode, but there were concerns that it would have dampened viewers' interests in the syndicated reruns. Thus, the series finale had them reconciling after a temporary breakup.

  6. #36

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    The Bill Cosby Show was on FOX17 from the 80's until mid 90's 93 was last time that it aired on FOX17, WXSP when they were UPN picked up The Bill Cosby Show for 2 years 03-05, then CW7 picked it up in 07-09 after that Bill Cosby hasn't been on local TV stations where I lived.

  7. #37
    I can't remember another successful ABC sitcom in syndication besides Full House (which was helped by being on both TBS and WGN [superstation feeds; it likely aired on the local versions as well])

  8. #38
    Back in the days when I would collect out of town issues of TV Guides I do remember seeing in the listings reruns for That's Incredible and Real People ( actually More Real People ). Denver's KDVR would air That's Incredible at 5AM on Saturdays back in 1989 while Real People I don't remember seeing that show in listings for the bigger markets but in some of the smaller ones it was there such as Casper, Wyoming for example. The now defunct CBS Eye on People channel would air both shows in the late 90s.

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by ftballfan View Post
    I can't remember another successful ABC sitcom in syndication besides Full House (which was helped by being on both TBS and WGN [superstation feeds; it likely aired on the local versions as well])
    WGN Chicago carried "Full House" with the other local Tribune O&Os (which at that time was only KTLA, WPIX, KWGN, and WGNO), but it didn't make it over to the Superstation side until the late 90s (probably by then, it was on its third or fourth rerun cycle). TBS also starting carrying Full House around the same time as Superstation WGN, if not a bit earlier.

    Other than "Roseanne" and "Family Matters", I couldn't think of any other old ABC sitcom from that time period that had a lengthy, successful run in off-net syndication. "Growing Pains", "Step by Step", and "Hangin' with Mr. Cooper" all had decent-at-best runs in syndication, and I could remember how bad "Head of the Class" tanked in syndication, especially here in Los Angeles; KCOP carried "HotC" for less than a year, and it was never seen here locally again since (at least until Antenna TV starts showing it within the next few months). I could remember in the L.A. Times TV guide Q&A, someone asked why wasn't "HotC" shown anyone on KCOP; I forgot the answer as to why, other bad ratings (and it was sandwiched in-between "The Cosby Show" and "Growing Pains"), but they've referred the viewer to watch it on San Diego's KUSI.
    Last edited by ShawnHill1; 01-05-2017 at 07:56 PM.

  10. #40
    I guess 'HotC' seems more 'dated' than some of those other shows you mentioned. It's relentlessly '80s', with a lot of '60s preaching by Mr. Moore. (The forced 'banter' between Charlie and Alan, the 'young Republican preppie', was essentially a ripoff of Alex and Steven Keaton on 'Family Ties').
    I used to watch it regularly in first run(in my teems), and thought it was good in spite of Howard Hesseman playing Charlie the 'wise old hippie'. I preferred the kids, and the principal, and felt the introduction of Billy Connolly in the final season was a great idea, at the wrong time.

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