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Thread: Please save pulse 87 again

  1. #21
    K.M. Richards
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    You done with your sour grapes?

    The CRB did not "allow" the agreement to expire. It had an expiration date all along, and you (the indie webcasters) did damned little to lobby for it to be renewed.

    Pureplay revenue is not decided by the FM broadcasters. It is decided by the music industry, who decides where they want to buy the plays.

    You can cite all the studies you want, but the fact is that it would take the majority of all the streamers with a limited number of connections each, to equal that of one medium-market's #1 FM station. You were outgunned before you even reached for your holster.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JD36108 View Post
    if you want an even playing field, make the FM guys pony up some of that Pureplay dough.
    Over the air stations pay for their digital streams just like Pandora or other streamers.

    Analog stations that do not broadcast digital copies are not subject to the DCMA regulations and payments.

    Studies have proven that Webcasters, like myself, have seen a substantial amount of growth in the last 2 years, pair that with the fact that auto makers are now making in car wifi standard options.
    The average car in the US is 11 years old. That means that less than 5% of all cars on the road have wifi capability, as not all cars sold in the last years have the capability you speak.
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  3. #23
    K.M. Richards
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    David's response made me think I misunderstood the original question, so I just did some more research.

    "Pureplay" is a term which applies only to standalone webcasting, not to radio (even stations streaming their broadcast signal), so the statement "make the FM guys pony up some of that Pureplay dough" is an uninformed one and is meaningless.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    Over the air stations pay for their digital streams just like Pandora or other streamers.

    Analog stations that do not broadcast digital copies are not subject to the DCMA regulations and payments.



    The average car in the US is 11 years old. That means that less than 5% of all cars on the road have wifi capability, as not all cars sold in the last years have the capability you speak.
    On the last statement, may I bring up this memory jogger about cars in 1970 that were equipped with FM radio. The truth always lies somewhere in the middle. Pureplay webcasting has been a rotten business model for the companies that have cash in bushel baskets to burn. Hobby webcasters...well, that sums it up right there.

    All the traditional models we've known for decades are getting upended. I missed this quote the first time around...

    "'Music itself is going to become like running water or electricity,'' he added. ''So it's like, just take advantage of these last few years because none of this is ever going to happen again. You'd better be prepared for doing a lot of touring because that's really the only unique situation that's going to be left. It's terribly exciting. But on the other hand it doesn't matter if you think it's exciting or not; it's what's going to happen.'' - David Bowie http://www.nytimes.com/2002/06/09/ar...repreneur.html

    This is the current-day struggle between the radio, no matter the method of delivery, and the artist.

  5. #25
    That's a great quote, and it's very true. Everyone expected to make millions from the switch to digital, and it really hasn't happened yet. The key problem is that the fans of the music don't want to pay. They can complain about radio all they want, but their customers have to pay before anyone gets paid. If the music fans want to listen for free, the creators will never make any money.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by K.M. Richards View Post
    You done with your sour grapes?

    The CRB did not "allow" the agreement to expire. It had an expiration date all along, and you (the indie webcasters) did damned little to lobby for it to be renewed.

    Pureplay revenue is not decided by the FM broadcasters. It is decided by the music industry, who decides where they want to buy the plays.

    You can cite all the studies you want, but the fact is that it would take the majority of all the streamers with a limited number of connections each, to equal that of one medium-market's #1 FM station. You were outgunned before you even reached for your holster.
    you do realize that it was the webcasters, many of whom are former cumulus and clear channel vets , that threatened terrestrial radio and forced them to begin streaming online?
    8 Year Multi-talented radio vet looking to get off the beach and back behind a Mic

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by JD36108 View Post
    you do realize that it was the webcasters, many of whom are former cumulus and clear channel vets , that threatened terrestrial radio and forced them to begin streaming online?
    How did they "threatened terrestrial radio" if they didn't have enough listeners to move the meters?

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    How did they "threatened terrestrial radio" if they didn't have enough listeners to move the meters?
    Stations were streaming online since the beginning of the World Wide Web in the mid 90s. Way before the present day Cumulus and Clear Channel/iHeart.

  9. #29
    K.M. Richards
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by gr8oldies View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by JD36108 View Post
    you do realize that it was the webcasters, many of whom are former cumulus and clear channel vets , that threatened terrestrial radio and forced them to begin streaming online?
    How did they "threatened terrestrial radio" if they didn't have enough listeners to move the meters?


    Stations were streaming online since the beginning of the World Wide Web in the mid 90s. Way before the present day Cumulus and Clear Channel/iHeart.
    I have a feeling we will be getting a lot of "sour grapes" posts from webcasters who are being shut down by the expiration of that agreement which gave them lower royalty rates. Reality check: As much as they are now whining about the CRB "failing to renew", the CRB had no obligation to do so. And they themselves did so little lobbying for a replacement agreement it is not surprising that it appeared they no longer cared.

    As for streaming being a threat to terrestrial radio: That's just wishful thinking, pure and simple. The independent webcasters never had enough listenership to make the minimum to show up in any ratings book; the only streams that I ever saw make the Arbitrons (previously) or the Nielsens (now) were those tied to broadcst stations. In fact, I bet if you combined all the listenership to the indie webcasters through last year you wouldn't have been able to equal the lowest-listenership broadcast stream.

    The piper must be paid. Internet content is not free by some inalienable right. There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch.

  10. #30
    The truth is the webcasters agreement had an expiration date. Everyone knew it was coming. Why didn't ANYONE do anything before it expired? What did they expect?

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