Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 454

Thread: Phone and email SPAM and SCAM alerts

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Administrator frankberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Midland, Michigan
    Posts
    2,814

    Phone and email SPAM and SCAM alerts

    I just received a call from (565) 454-3434. (That number doesn't look suspicious, does it?) 565 is not a valid area code.
    The woman on the other end of this very ... VERY short phone call had a pronounced foreign accent (perhaps from India).
    She claimed to be from the United Government for the States of America.
    HUH?
    I didn't bother to listen to anything more.
    I told her to quit scamming me.
    I hung up the phone.

    I have no idea what she wanted but I fear that others may be taken-in by these calls.
    Our younger RadioDiscussions.com members might want to warn their older friends and family members about this scam.

    Grumpy, crabby, short-tempered but not gullible ol' Frank
    Last edited by frankberry; 02-26-2016 at 09:22 AM.

  2. #2
    My rule these days is if I don't recognize the number, particularly if it's an unfamiliar area code, I don't answer. 99-1/2% of the time, it's a scam. And I get dozens a day. And I'm on the do-not-call list.

  3. #3
    Administrator frankberry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Midland, Michigan
    Posts
    2,814
    I'm on the do-not-call list too. I knew it was a scam when I saw the phone number. I've blocked the number and any number with the area code 565. I'm not sure why my cell phone provider doesn't block these bogus calls. Oh well .... it gave me a chance to be nasty to someone without feeling guilty.

  4. #4
    This is one of the older scams out there. They call and pretend to be either from the U.S. government or with "Windows Services" (note: not Microsoft, just Windows). They claim that there's a virus on your computer and that they'll instruct you on how to let them into your computer. If you do a reverse search on that number, you'll find a TON of postings to that effect on various message boards set up for exactly this reason.

  5. #5
    The Do Not Call list means nothing to these clowns. They know they're breaking the law but don't care. They can post a fake number to the caller ID that has a valid area code or even a totally valid number, so they're harder to trace.


    I've had problems with calls that start with recorded messages with scams to consolidate your bills or sell security systems. Most of the time if you call it back you'll get a message that the phone number is no longer in service. I've also had some scam calls that have my own area code (731) and when I called it back it went to the voice mail for some valid phone number that didn't belong to the scammers.

    I like the idea that someone had on another forum, which was to press 1 to speak to a person, and then blast them with an air horn!!! I tried that with a car horn, but I found out that all it does is make them call you more, apparently because pressing 1 makes them think you're actually interested, and they get worse about calling you.

    I've found out the best response is to hang up on them immediately and don't press 1 even to retaliate.
    Last edited by anotherguy; 11-03-2014 at 02:09 PM.

  6. #6
    We need to come up with a way to yank their chains so that their scams bounce back on them so hard that they just never recover. Until that happy day, however, I just don't answer a call I do not recognize. United Government for the States of America, eh?
    No irony there.

  7. #7
    Not necessarily a scam but my technique for robo-calls is to listen for a couple of seconds after picking up the receiver. If I hear background noise (think of a call center) the call gets disconnected immediately. Same if someone asks for me by name without first identifying themselves. And the same if it remains silent. I figure if it is important they will call back. We are inundated with political calls, calls from charities and people with which we do not do business trying to do business. The Do Not Call registry helped for a little while but is being largely ignored today.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Southington, Connecticut
    Posts
    9,587
    Quote Originally Posted by anotherguy View Post
    The Do Not Call list means nothing to these clowns. They know they're breaking the law but don't care. They can post a fake number to the caller ID that has a valid area code or even a totally valid number, so they're harder to trace.


    I've had problems with calls that start with recorded messages with scams to consolidate your bills or sell security systems. Most of the time if you call it back you'll get a message that the phone number is no longer in service. I've also had some scam calls that have my own area code (731) and when I called it back it went to the voice mail for some valid phone number that didn't belong to the scammers.

    I like the idea that someone had on another forum, which was to press 1 to speak to a person, and then blast them with an air horn!!! I tried that with a car horn, but I found out that all it does is make them call you more, apparently because pressing 1 makes them think you're actually interested, and they get worse about calling you.

    I've found out the best response is to hang up on them immediately and don't press 1 even to retaliate.
    It's called Caller ID Spoofing. How many of you have had this happen to you? The person listed on the caller ID calling you is listed as your name and number? I live with my Mom Tina and a few times we've gotten calls on the caller ID that say Tina B 860-xxx-xxxx. (I'm not posting our real phone number on a public forum). Of course we don't answer it.

  9. #9
    It may be because of the difference in the model of the phone, but the scam calls I got usually didn't have a name on the caller ID. Most of the calls were on my work phone, which was a Blackberry until a couple of months back when I got a Samsung Galaxy S4. (Talk about a MAJOR improvement!!! ) Since then the scam calls have gone down, and I never received as many on my personal or home phones for some reason.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Solano County, California
    Posts
    9,156
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-0...public/8314968

    The Russian Dating scam well its too timely due to recent events though. I got spammed with Russian dating scams and I luckily deleted them mainly because they happen to be sent right when Russia is on the news or political reasons.

    As a warning to others, a Mount Gambier man is sharing the details of his three-month dialogue with scammers who assumed the alias of a Russian woman on a popular Australian dating website.

    Unreported dating scams rife


    Australians are delivering millions into the hands of scammers in the hope of romance and love with many incidents unreported.
    'Her' name was Aleksandra and 'she' was young and pretty with a long, dark mane of hair and dark brown eyes.

    She contacted Dave (not his real name) on dating site Zoosk in November last year, telling him she was a 32-year-old Russian woman eager to pursue a serious relationship.

    "And every day my feelings to you become stronger and I feel that we have a connection! And now we meet each other..."
    Her emails from a Gmail account arrived every two days and at first were full of the little details of her life, like walking in the park with her friends and hanging out for pizza.

    She sent dozens of pictures of her eating cake, dressed in a bathrobe, lying chastely on the bed, always dressed in white.

    It was a mere two weeks before Aleksandra's emails swung in a more intimate direction, peppered with loving endearments and declarations of their future together.

    perfect pair quote
    A smitten Dave began to make plans, discussing travelling to Russia to see her — but he also had his doubts.

    Unusually for someone her age, Aleksandra had no Facebook, Twitter or Instagram accounts. In fact, there were no online traces of her at all.

    She had emailed her phone number but told Dave he could not call her, saying "my phone doesn't accept international calls".

    Although she said she was 32 years old, the pictures she sent appeared to be of a much younger woman.

    It was December when the first plea for help with her travel arrangements arrived in Dave's inbox.

    "My dear, you have 310 dollars now? Help me. Let's do it and meet me! I love you. I can't live without you."
    But Aleksandra told him she had no bank account so money must be sent via transfers through Moneygram or Western Union.

    bank account quote
    When Dave told his friends about his new girlfriend, they laughed and said: "mate, you're getting scammed" but Dave kept emailing and Aleksandra always knew the right thing to say to assuage his doubts.

    "I'm not a crook, and not cheat on you. I'm honest with you. My intentions are serious. I have for you a huge and sincere feelings. I am the one in the photos. I am a real. I love you!"
    She sent him passport pictures, told him she had spoken about their future to her family and even started to call him "husband".

    "You are my loved man and I don't want to lose you," she reminded him constantly.

    But Aleksandra repeated her requests that Dave transfer money to pay for her visa and half her airfare so she could travel to Australia and arrive at "the day when our dreams and desires become real".

    A call from 'Aleksandra'

    On Valentines Day this year, Dave was woken up just before 7am by a call from a private number.

    The Aleksandra on the phone was less loving, more forthright and after wishing him "happy Valentine's Day", she quizzed him: "you are going to send the money?"

    When he tried to call back, using the number she had emailed him, it was disconnected.

    Dave emailed her to say he was starting to doubt her story, which provoked a lengthy and impassioned response.

    Police station quote
    Included with the email was a copy of her passport, showing her name, address and photograph.

    Despite his concerns, in February Dave went to his Mount Gambier bank branch to make a transfer of $400 to Aleksandra but he was stopped by a bank employee who told him bluntly she believed he was being scammed.

    When Dave's friends suggested 'Aleksandra' might even be a man, his mood changed abruptly.

    He wrote Aleksandra a final email.

    "Sorry but I'm not a pay-for-everything sort of bloke. If you are serious about loving me and coming here, you will have to pay for it all yourself. Goodbye Aleksandra."
    A week went by and there was no reply from the woman who had told Dave multiple times she was going to marry him.

    Aleksandra had moved onto new victims.

Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

     
Useful Contacts
Community


123