Production standards (or lack of)
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Thread: Production standards (or lack of)

  1. #1

    Production standards (or lack of)

    Listening to talk radio is a challenge. Where are the production values? I often hear 6 or 7 or 8 voice only spots in a row. Who wants to hear that? No background beds. No jingles. No SFX. Just blah blah blah with repeated 800 phone numbers. Where are the consultants? Are they as boring as the lazy non production between the talk segments?And broadcasters are wondering why listeners are abandoning the format. Could it be that the stop sets are as boring as the drivel coming out of the talkshow hosts mouths?

    Few stations get this right. KFI is excellent regarding production values. They get the numbers too.

    All talk radio should BE PRODUCED with plenty of bells and whistles. That is the recipe for good radio. NPR gets it. They always break it up with produced elements.

    While I'm at it, the PUKE PROMO VOICES need to be rested too.

    My rant is over. Have a nice day.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by radiowizard101 View Post
    Listening to talk radio is a challenge. Where are the production values? I often hear 6 or 7 or 8 voice only spots in a row.
    You realize the spots are the domain of the advertisers, not programmers. The spots aren't subject to the approval of consultants. The money is the money. Those are probably the only spots a talk station can attract these days, because all the bigger advertisers have "Do Not Buy" orders that keep them out of controversial programming.

    NPR gets it by not having commercials. If AM talk could get its audience to pay for the programming, it would sound a lot better.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by radiowizard101 View Post
    Few stations get this right. KFI is excellent regarding production values. They get the numbers too.
    Yeah, the numbers. 19th in 25-54.
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  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post

    Yeah, the numbers. 19th in 25-54.
    Apples to apples please, David. KFI does well compared to other talk stations.

    And radiowizard101 is absolutely right in terms of production values. Whoever's running the ship at KFI knows what sounds good and has the guts to make it happen.

    Quote Originally Posted by The Big A
    You realize the spots are the domain of the advertisers, not programmers. The spots aren't subject to the approval of consultants.
    On KFI the Kars for Kids commercial is reworked as a voiceover with the jingle music softly in the background instead of sung by that whiny kid. Shows it can be done. Perhaps radio would get more respect from advertisers by standing up to them for what's actually in the best interest of both parties.

  5. #5
    I suggest you direct this to ad agencies, not the station. I'll bet if you paid attention, you'd notice local spots have production and national spots don't. I'd also bet the people at the stations you blame for this noticed it long before you and don't like it a bit more than you do.

  6. #6
    Who's running a 6 or 7 or 8 minute break set? About the longest I hear is 5, and that usually includes a news/weather/sports hit.
    "Its music what makes a radio station, and at Live FM, we play the last music around."
    After receiving that copy, I quit the VO industry.

  7. #7
    The production values in national spots described here show just how little regard ad agencies and clients have for radio - even those that still buy radio.

    And remember this is right-wing talk radio: We are talking about advertisers who have not placed the format and its hosts on their do not buy lists - in other words, bottom feeders.

    Not commercials on public radio? Maybe so, technically. But those enhanced underwriting announcements sound like commercials to most people. And for the record, those "spots" run on member stations (often during NPR programs) but not on NPR. Public radio spots are voice only but at least they don't do interminable stop sets. It would be nice to have opinions on public radio here from people who have actually listened to it (or worked in it).
    Last edited by Oscar Madison; 06-24-2015 at 08:52 AM.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post

    Perhaps radio would get more respect from advertisers by standing up to them for what's actually in the best interest of both parties.
    The first rule of business is the customer is always right. They're the ones paying for the time.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    The first rule of business is the customer is always right. They're the ones paying for the time.
    They are not really paying for time. They are paying for the attention of the audience. Attention is radio's product and it is not in a broadcaster's interest to degrade the product to make a quick sale. It also explains why blue chip "customers" no longer buy radio.

    The phrase "the customer is always right" was coined by Harry Selfridge and he was was talking about customer service in a department store. He did not sell shoddy good nor compromise the integrity of his operation to pander to a customers' whims.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar Madison View Post
    They are not really paying for time. They are paying for the attention of the audience. Attention is radio's product and it is not in a broadcaster's interest to degrade the product to make a quick sale. It also explains why blue chip "customers" no longer buy radio.
    Not true. Lots of "blue chip customers" buy radio. Just not AM Talk radio. That's what this thread is about.

    Advertisers are paying for time. They are charged for a combination of time and audience. No guarantee that they will get that audience's attention. That's up to the advertiser to GRAB the potential audience's attention.

    The blue chip advertisers spend a lot of money studying the audience they want to reach. They know what they're doing. A lot of these voice-only spots are from billion dollar drug companies like Chattem who believe that hitting listeners over the head is a way to get their attention. They spend lots of money on AM radio, and no smart salesman is going to turn them down because of "production values." Radio stations aren't museums. They're businesses, and business isn't always pretty.

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