How many hosts are left? - Page 2
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Thread: How many hosts are left?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by vchimpanzee View Post
    And if they're not, there's always Bill Bennett.

    I think he's only on stations owned by Salem.

  2. #12
    It's interesting to note that radio has evolved from a collection of block programs in the early 20th century to a very consistent 24/7 listener experience throughout much of the late 20th century to a completely inconsistent experience today. In NYC circa 1980 if you wanted to hear talk you tuned to WMCA, WOR or WABC at any time of the day or night, weekends included. There was no such thing as an infomercial. (Sports preemptions have always been a problem, IMO.)

    Whether it's economically feasible to offer a consistent experience anymore is a matter for the bean counters to decide but I don't see anything positive in radio's future if it can't somehow be done. New generations have found that they can reliably what they want on the Internet whether it's noon on Wednesday or 3 am on Sunday. The average person forms opinions of media bases on what they sample. If a talk station plays music on the weekends or infomercials overnight they're very likely to create a serious number of wrong impressions.

    Terrestrial radio still has the advantages of ubiquity (with a small u) and convenience. Not so true for AM due to decreasing signal viability and lack of am receiving equipment, but it's generally easier to turn on a radio than to search for stuff on the Internet. You can tune radios all over the house to the same station without latency issues -- try that with Internet streams. You don't need Internet, WiFi or a phone data plan. But we're training people -- especially young people -- to avoid radio because, when they happen to tune in, it sucks.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post
    But we're training people -- especially young people -- to avoid radio because, when they happen to tune in, it sucks.
    That only applies to the three AM stations you mentioned. When they tune in to FM music stations, they're playing the hits they want to hear.

  4. #14
    This is a "news/talk" thread.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post
    This is a "news/talk" thread.
    But you're making a generalization about radio. Young people don't listen to AM news/talk radio. We already know that. Young people aren't avoiding radio...just news/talk radio.

    The folks in San Francisco already know that if you want to attract young people to AM, the way to do it is with sports.
    Last edited by TheBigA; 04-11-2015 at 03:23 PM.

  6. #16
    Young people don't listen to AM news/talk radio.
    Maybe that's because of the sorry state of news/talk radio today. Chicken? Egg? I don't know and I don't think you do either.

    Remember, Rush wasn't always the angry, irrelevant fossil you hear today. He once attracted a much younger demo, and he did so in a 24/7 news/talk environment run by individual station PDs who gave at least some thought to their audiences.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Actually I say the smaller the market, the more likely there is to be local talk.

    Take for example market #186: Binghampton NY.
    You make a good point. I looked at some other markets above #175 and found they all had at least one local daily talk show. I still think there's a donut hole somewhere where local talk is unlikely, but it apparently isn't as big as I previously thought.
    "Its music what makes a radio station, and at Live FM, we play the last music around."
    After receiving that copy, I quit the VO industry.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post
    Maybe that's because of the sorry state of news/talk radio today. Chicken? Egg? I don't know and I don't think you do either.
    Remember that I work in radio, and I've worked in a lot of markets besides New York, so I've heard a lot of talk show hosts. Just because you don't like talk radio in New York doesn't mean it's exactly the same everywhere else. There are younger, hipper talk show hosts in other places. And as I said, I know that sports talk appeals to young audiences. But mean, angry right wing talk absolutely does NOT appeal to young people. I've read lots of studies and articles on what millennals like, and here's one you might read. Consider what you find interesting on the radio, and then think of it through the eyes of someone half your age:

    http://time.com/2974185/millennials-poll-politics/

    We've had success using on-air dating to get millennials to listen to talk radio. But I don't think you'd find it the least bit interesting or compelling.

  9. #19
    Remember that I work in radio,
    Whoopdee-do! I'm impressed. You assume I don't work in radio? In any case it doesn't matter -- AFAIK this forum is open for anyone to express an opinion.

    And as it happens you're reinforcing what I said:

    Rush wasn't always the angry, irrelevant fossil you hear today. He once attracted a much younger demo, ...
    Obviously what appeals to today's youth is different from then.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post
    Whoopdee-do! I'm impressed.
    I didn't say it to impress. I said it because YOU said I don't know why young people don't listen to news/talk. I do. You're also approaching this topic as a listener, not as a professional. As I said, if radio stations go after that younger demographic, you won't like what they do. Right now, there are music stations in NYC that are largely all talk in the morning, and a lot of young people listen. If you were more tolerant of the music they played, or the topics they discussed, you might enjoy it. Or you might not. Talk radio isn't limited to talking about conservative politics, and it's not limited to the three AM stations you identified. You didn't talk about WNYC or the other non-coms that program talk.

    If Rush changed his act, it might alienate his current fan base. Older audiences don't adapt well to change. And younger audiences aren't as likely to accidentally tune in their grandparent's radio station. The choice of broadening the programming on AM talk stations to appeal to younger audiences isn't very likely since young people, raised in the digital age, won't put up with the bad audio quality of AM. You didn't mention that either.
    Last edited by TheBigA; 04-12-2015 at 10:07 AM.

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