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Thread: How much experience will I need before getting a full time gig in the radio biz?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Ravens View Post
    Be ready to move.
    Indeed! Living with your parents does get a little difficult

  2. #12
    Okay guys, not to open this thread up again but I could really benefit from some advice...

    Things are going extremely well for me at the radio station I currently work for, and I am very pleased with my fill-in status. However, there is one problem. I might have to move out of the area late next year. At any rate, I am looking into other radio stations where I could work (not major market), but I heard that I would basically have to go back to promotions (i.e, having to be a gofer and setting up for events... probably unpaid) if I were to try and find work.

    In your professional opinion, do I have a chance of working somewhere else yet? I have experience in drive time slots, as well as airchecks that prove my ability to connect with the audience, not to mention there really isn't anything new for me to learn about how to be on the air. If I have no choice but to go back to square one I think i'll try to scrape up a way to stay where I am.

    Thanks.

  3. #13
    Depends. At your current location, what other job and/or education opportunities exist? If you have other options that can dove-tail nicely with the radio gig, and the radio gig becomes at least a regular, not fill-in only PT slot by the end of eight or twelve months, then I'd stay put. On the other hand, if other opportunities are limited where you live, then you may need to make that move.

    You could work at some fast-food joint or deliver pizza for a few years while you're young and continue to ply your radio craft (as long as you're at least regularly scheduled PT) where you are and see where that takes you. If you're in a one-horse town like where I grew up and you don't plan on taking over the family business or farm, you don't want to spend more than a few years at fast-food/pizza/other junk retail and PT radio. If that's the case, you will eventually want to move to a larger area with more opportunities, whether that's in radio or not. If you move to a larger radio market, make sure there's a decent two or four year college there.

    When you go on to college, whether the tech route or traditional four-year, I would go light on the media courses. You want to prepare for a plan B in case radio/TV/media doesn't pan out. In fact, some journalism schools require students to have a second major that isn't a media concentration.

    If I had it to do over again...I'd go radiology or study to be a cell-phone tech for my plan B, but I'm sure there are many other viable options that could be monetized.
    Last edited by joebtsflk1; 01-02-2015 at 07:27 PM.

  4. #14
    Unregistered
    Guest

    Don't listen to others

    Just go out with what you have and a positive attitude, and a "will do"mindset. You will be all right.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by joebtsflk1 View Post
    Depends. At your current location, what other job and/or education opportunities exist? If you have other options that can dove-tail nicely with the radio gig, and the radio gig becomes at least a regular, not fill-in only PT slot by the end of eight or twelve months, then I'd stay put. On the other hand, if other opportunities are limited where you live, then you may need to make that move.

    You could work at some fast-food joint or deliver pizza for a few years while you're young and continue to ply your radio craft (as long as you're at least regularly scheduled PT) where you are and see where that takes you. If you're in a one-horse town like where I grew up and you don't plan on taking over the family business or farm, you don't want to spend more than a few years at fast-food/pizza/other junk retail and PT radio. If that's the case, you will eventually want to move to a larger area with more opportunities, whether that's in radio or not. If you move to a larger radio market, make sure there's a decent two or four year college there.

    When you go on to college, whether the tech route or traditional four-year, I would go light on the media courses. You want to prepare for a plan B in case radio/TV/media doesn't pan out. In fact, some journalism schools require students to have a second major that isn't a media concentration.

    If I had it to do over again...I'd go radiology or study to be a cell-phone tech for my plan B, but I'm sure there are many other viable options that could be monetized.
    Thanks for some great advice Lucky for me, my first radio job is medium market, and not a small station in a small town. I am a student, so I utilize radio as my hobby (and part time job) whenever I can, but I don't rely on it.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by fordranger797 View Post

    In your professional opinion, do I have a chance of working somewhere else yet?
    Truthfully, you're the best judge of that. Have you begun networking outside of your own community? Building contacts and references with people who can give potential employers in other markets positive comments about you and your work? What do you know about your next market? That can be a problem when giving traffic information. You may be able to connect with the audience where you live, but can that translate to people in another area? And the bigger question is what's the job environment like where you're going? On air work is the most competitive part of radio. Everyone wants to do it. Much easier to break in to new markets doing other things, learn the geography and community, then go on-air. Just my two cents.

  7. #17
    Overall, my biggest concern was having to drop down to working on a street team or general event work. It sounds like i've graduated well beyond that.
    Last edited by fordranger797; 01-05-2015 at 01:08 AM.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Truthfully, you're the best judge of that. Have you begun networking outside of your own community? Building contacts and references with people who can give potential employers in other markets positive comments about you and your work? What do you know about your next market? That can be a problem when giving traffic information. You may be able to connect with the audience where you live, but can that translate to people in another area? And the bigger question is what's the job environment like where you're going? On air work is the most competitive part of radio. Everyone wants to do it. Much easier to break in to new markets doing other things, learn the geography and community, then go on-air. Just my two cents.
    Well here is where I am...
    I'm very happy with how far I have come working in a medium market. Not to mention, I do not rely on radio to pay the bills, therefore I can focus on the unique opportunities (rather than making my living at this current point in time). I would love to make the step up to major market radio and work as a part time fill-in, but i'm unsure of whether or not i'd even have a chance. I've had to adapt to many different challenges, so I believe I have the skill to jump right into a major (or another medium) market if I must leave. Thankfully, I have met a few connections along the way so i'm not entirely alone . This thought brings me to a question (if you don't mind me asking).

    What would your advice me for approaching a major market program director about working part time as a fill-in? [I tend to find job information very ambiguous on major market radio markets. You can typically find information on promotions assistant openings, but nothing at all on other job opportunities.]
    Last edited by fordranger797; 01-05-2015 at 01:47 AM.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by fordranger797 View Post
    Overall, my biggest concern was having to drop down to working on a street team or general event work. It sounds like i've graduated well beyond that.
    I honestly wouldn't do that.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Ravens View Post
    I honestly wouldn't do that.
    Sometimes it's worth it to take a step back in order to move a few steps ahead. I took a big pay cut when I left being a union engineer. It paid off in the long run.

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