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Thread: "Disney's Devastating Signal"

  1. #11
    Fred's got the point exactly. This isn't about a handful of stations scattered across the country doing well, this is about the band as a whole becoming ignored by the consumer. Believe me, I have nothing but love for those who are still doing live, local, relevant radio, even on AM. But the majority of those owners are turning their attention (if they haven't already) online and building a community around their web site, not their transmitter. They see the writing on the wall. The day is fast coming when the decision has to be made: do I sell this thing off, or do I just turn off the transmitter and turn in the license? The wise owners already have their answer because they're prepared for the future. Disney is among them.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    You can call it whatever you want. They're calling it radio, and so are their customers.

    You can listen to podcasts on devices other than iPods. That doesn't change that they're still podcasts.
    But you can't listen to radio without a radio receiver. You can listen to a radio station via streaming but that isn't radio. The content might be identical but the medium isn't. Neither is the misuse of the definition.

  3. #13
    Radio Disney is not known for impressive signal strength or power. New York and LA aside, most of the RD channels are high band low wattage, therefore this really does not surprise me. For Radio Disney to really work, they need a frequency and a power that can really be heard over a major listening area reliably. Actually, its easier for some of the people on the east coast to DX the Radio Disney signal from New York at nighttime rather than find their own RD outlet.

    I disagree with the notion that AM radio is dead. However, I don't think its an appropriate platform for what RD wants to accomplish. They are more quantity over quality at this stage.
    Last edited by fordranger797; 08-14-2014 at 10:49 PM.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by fordranger797 View Post
    Radio Disney is not known for impressive signal strength or power. New York and LA aside, most of the RD channels are high band low wattage, therefore this really does not surprise me. For Radio Disney to really work, they need a frequency and a power that can really be heard over a major listening area reliably. Actually, its easier for some of the people on the east coast to DX the Radio Disney signal from New York at nighttime rather than find their own RD outlet.
    That may be the case now, but back when they started, those stations were actually halfway decent. And they weren't the only ones: there were a handful of affiliates owned by other companies. Heck, the former affiliate in Milwaukee could be heard all over southern Michigan in the daytime, partly because of that high band position (there was very little up there to interfere with them). There are claims today that WMYM down in Miami doesn't even make it up to Broward, but I was listening to it as far north as Boca Raton back in '99.

    Fact is, Disney had a great thing going at first. They were doing gangbusters with the kids and soccer moms when they first got going. But that was back when the AM band was still listenable, back before modern-day technology both trashed it with electronic noise and made it technologically obsolete with streaming, Bluetooth connections from the phone to the dashboard and apps that offer greater interactivity with the listeners than AM radio ever could. As the listeners shifted to digital, the transmitters became less important, and a good thing, too, because you can't hear them anymore.

    It's a sign of the times. AM is obsolete. Anyone trying to hang on is only going to get swept downstream.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by JoshTheRadioDude View Post
    It's a sign of the times. AM is obsolete. Anyone trying to hang on is only going to get swept downstream.
    I still enjoy 50's and 60's oldies on the AM band. It works perfectly for that. It does not work for high modulation songs like you hear on RD.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post

    But you can't listen to radio without a radio receiver. You can listen to a radio station via streaming but that isn't radio.
    And if you go to my post, I said "Apple & Google are creating radio stations."

    You can be right, and it won't matter. If people want to call something by a wrong name, that's their business.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by fordranger797 View Post
    I still enjoy 50's and 60's oldies on the AM band. It works perfectly for that. It does not work for high modulation songs like you hear on RD.
    You're in the distinct minority. And I guarantee you that the owners of stations still running that format are doing so at very low cost and with FM signals bringing in the bucks to allow them to do so.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by JoshTheRadioDude View Post
    You're in the distinct minority. And I guarantee you that the owners of stations still running that format are doing so at very low cost and with FM signals bringing in the bucks to allow them to do so.
    There are many AM radio stations that are extremely successful. Where I live, a classic country radio station hit the market as a brand new AM signal a few years ago. They are doing very well; same with the oldies. This isn't a small town either; its a major city.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by fordranger797 View Post
    There are many AM radio stations that are extremely successful. Where I live, a classic country radio station hit the market as a brand new AM signal a few years ago. They are doing very well; same with the oldies. This isn't a small town either; its a major city.
    And does it not make sense that such larger markets would have a bigger potential audience of older listeners, making it financially viable for the time being? The situation you're presenting isn't justifying the case for extended viability of AM radio, it's simply proving my point.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by fordranger797 View Post
    There are many AM radio stations that are extremely successful. Where I live, a classic country radio station hit the market as a brand new AM signal a few years ago. They are doing very well; same with the oldies. This isn't a small town either; its a major city.
    The AMs around here are pretty split. They are either doing well or absolutely tanking. A lot of it does have to do with how the stations are run. The stations that have some local content and better overall programming (non-satellite) are definitely rated higher. But many of those same stations also seem to be the ones that are buying the FM translators and building the online audiences. They know the future of AM is not going to be in their favor. And with announcements like BMW excluding AM from one of their upcoming cars, the future may come a lot sooner than some expect.

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