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Thread: How to kill an industry

  1. #71

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    But I find that, other than some utilities and things like Firefox, productivity software is costly and always lacking something that is "still under development."
    Most industries are in a continuous improvement mode which means improvements and functionality are always being addressed. For the professional user in specific circumstances this may be important. For most of us it isn't. For example, I have been using Office 2003 since it was introduced and have never needed a functionality upgrade. I am still using XP Pro because it has all the functionality (and stability) I require. Although there have been numerous upgrades to both these products I do not need them so I refuse to upgrade and thereby save myself considerable effort.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    I've been through a dozen scanning / scanned image processing options before coming up with one that works and does almost exactly what I want. Of course, it's not the downloadable $40 generalist shareware program, but ran around $6000 and gets about 12 updates a year, including a couple I requested.
    There is a difference between "normal" user and "professional" user and it is evident you are in the latter category by this illustration. I have paid for very little software over the years using instead freeware or shareware. It is interesting to note that the most problem-prone software I own is one I purchased from a well-known software manufacturer.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    Sure CC Cleaner and many utilities are free, and others are nominally priced, but few satisfy the needs of more demanding use. And with the PC I still have to do a regular round of driver update checks otherwise the updates on one program kill the older ones. And a fresh install of Win 7 every 5 or 6 months is vital... all these being things that make, to many users, the Apple devices with controllable closed architectures much more appealing.
    You are obviously in a strata far beyond the average computer user. I cannot remember the last time I was required to "do a round of driver updates" and most updates, such as Flash, arrive on my PC straight from the manufacturer. Updating takes two button pushes and about 10 seconds. And the only time I have ever re-installed my OS was when I upgraded. With proper maintenance procedures in place you should never have to re-install the OS (which, I admit, is a real PITA on a Windows-based machine).

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    Let's see.. Windows 7 has how many versions? Home, Professional and Ultra, and then there are 32 bit and 64 bit versions of those.... things like that, from the offset, make PCs inherently more confusing to the consumer who wants to use a computer the same way they use a TV or refrigerator.
    The average PC user has but one choice - 32 or 64 bit depending upon his hardware. The Home version should be the default. Professional users, or their IT departments, are the only ones having to choose from the more functional versions of Windows. This is primarily a cost choice and gives the purchaser some flexibility and price options - something Apple does not provide.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    For the vast majority of tasks, the Apple's simplicity, interface and attractive designs (any laptop I would consider buying is always a dull black brick) are to be preferred. In some areas, like using devices with multiple languages, Apple is far ahead. My iPad is set up to tap its way from Spanish to English to Portuguese keyboards... on a PC, changing language is tedious and changing keyboards is a significant process.
    My PC sits on my desk and is large enough so that I can work inside if necessary but small enough not to overpower my limited desktop. I do not use laptops. Functionality means much more to me than an attractive design. Although I do not normally function in multiple languages I haven't found the changing to be a big deal. Once initial set up there is practically no effort.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    But you could have seemlessly upgraded to better hardware. I'm already anticipating Ivy Bridge, which means the tower gets a new MB, and maybe faster memory. My remaining SATA I devices will likely have to be replaced with SATA II ones, although my boot SSD is already SATA II... and I go through things like that at least once a year. Again, how many people want to lie on their side on the floor with a shop light installing a new drive or MoBo, going through the still-scarry process of flashing BIOS, etc?
    The initial speed of my PC has been adequate for use for almost a decade. If I wanted to upgrade say to full-out gaming from ordinary desktop use I would replace the entire machine. Otherwise, I have upgraded the drives (although the original IDE drive is still installed and still works perfectly) and added more memory (again, the flexibility was built in by the manufacturer). Several add-in cards have been installed to provide specialized functionality (such as a TV tuner) and enough capacity exists within the box that I don't need to upgrade the MoBo. Parts and pieces only. And I have never needed to flash my BIOS.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    This is sort of like radio. For the moment, radio is simple to use, but limited to a few varieties that someone else picked for you. The moment that devices make picking streams and webcasts that simple and that ubiquitous, yet customizable to my taste, the single-use device called a "radio" will be gone. But for much of the market, ease of use is the key...
    I don't disagree with you that ease of use is in Apple's favor although a ton of users continue using the PC without maintenance issues. Given that Apple began as an educational tool it is normal that 'simplistic' outranks 'flexibility'. There is obviously a market for both and Apple has been successful in its niche.
    Illegitimi non carborundum

  2. #72

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    I spend zero time maintaining the 4 iPhones and 3 iPads.
    Be careful of which you speak. The following is a post from another board related to issues with an iPad upgrade:

    I just got bitten by this upgrade and am posting this so with any luck those of you with an Ipad can avoid the same mistake I just made with the upgrade.

    I have an iPad2. Yesterday, while attempting a backup of my ipad, I was informed that a new version of Itunes was available, so I downloaded it, installed it etc. I was then informed that a new "OS" was available "iOS5" so I downloaded that too.

    It then asked if I'd like to back up and install the new OS, which I did. Low and behold, it didn't back up anything, just installed the new OS and deleted ALL my videos and photos ( of my new Grandson) AND wiped out most of my applications, even purchased ones! I've now spent a total of 10+ hours rebuilding my ipad.

    After an hour on the phone with Apple, they basically said, "we don't know what to tell you, sorry about that"...........a&&hats!

    So word of caution for those inclined to upgrade to the new OS. Back it up first and foremost. Also, there is a utility on the web called iexplorer that you can download here http://www.macroplant.com/iexplorer/ that treats your ipad like a USB stick. You can run this app and copy all your images off onto a hard drive "just in case" the backup doesn't work.........which in my case it didn't, hence all my images are gone.............FOREVER!

    Hope this helps someone not go through the same thing I went through...............my SO is ready to hang me for losing those images and videos! Oyyyyyyyy.


    Illegitimi non carborundum

  3. #73

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna
    So word of caution for those inclined to upgrade to the new OS. Back it up first and foremost. Also, there is a utility on the web called iexplorer that you can download here http://www.macroplant.com/iexplorer/ that treats your ipad like a USB stick. You can run this app and copy all your images off onto a hard drive "just in case" the backup doesn't work.........which in my case it didn't, hence all my images are gone.............FOREVER!
    Another advantage of Android phones. Plug them into the USB port on a PC, and they become just another disk drive. You do have to enable it on the phone, but that's trivial.
    We have to save the Earth! It's the only planet with football and beer.

  4. #74

    Re: How to kill an industry

    I consider myself a power user, and do a LOT with PCs, and I've never had to reload Windows 7. David, I don't know what you're doing with your computers, but I've yet to have a driver update cause the kind of problems that you describe. If it did, I'd simply roll it back. Worst case scenario would be re-imaging the drive, which is MUCH easier under Windows 7 than any previous version.

    The lack of software, lack of backward compatibility, lack of aftermarket support, and closed nature of Apple negate any "simplicity" for me. Windows works for me, and I have far more applications available than Mac. iPad is a nice toy, but hardly a replacement for a good laptop, let alone a well-appointed desktop.
    Did I forget that <<sarcasm>> tag again?

  5. #75

    More OT but relevant...

    @ landtuna and anyone looking for more FREE backup options:

    I am really happy with the features that DropBox provides; meaning anytime I make a change within Dropbox (simply another folder in 'My Documents') I have three other computers that catch the change(s) within their corresponding files. I can also access this through the web on any other web enabled device.

    Click this and take a look around: http://db.tt/ieUKIH7

  6. #76

    Re: More OT but relevant...

    Quote Originally Posted by TomZ
    @ landtuna and anyone looking for more FREE backup options:

    I am really happy with the features that DropBox provides; meaning anytime I make a change within Dropbox (simply another folder in 'My Documents') I have three other computers that catch the change(s) within their corresponding files. I can also access this through the web on any other web enabled device.

    Click this and take a look around: http://db.tt/ieUKIH7
    This technology looks a lot like the Sybase Replication Server of a database product of 15 years ago.

    I don't have multiple connected devices so don't have the need for replication. I also wasn't one of the people looking for a new backup scheme but for the price nothing can touch my two Firewire-connected external disk drives. I use a free backup program from Seagate which can back up in file or image format. Makes it very easy to restore if the need arises.

    Both external drives are portable and one can fit in your shirt pocket for easy use on remote machines or transfer of huge files and at much faster speeds than uploading to the 'Net. Encrypting the data means I don't share any info across the 'Net or on somebody else's server.
    Illegitimi non carborundum

  7. #77

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Oh, my bad, tuna. I thought you lost something "FOREVER" .....

  8. #78

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Quote Originally Posted by TomZ
    Oh, my bad, tuna. I thought you lost something "FOREVER" .....
    I quoted a post from another board. Sorry about the confusion.
    Illegitimi non carborundum

  9. #79

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Or you could just take your own little station in the middle of nowhere down, by following people of whom you are jealous and then announcing that you have lots of money from your married boyfriend to help you to outdo those you follow around, thus perfecting your career.
    No irony there.

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