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Thread: How to kill an industry

  1. #11

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Casey, I hate to tell you this, but 4G relies on running fiber to every cell tower. Right now, a LOT of cell towers are serviced by old copper repurposed into T-carriers. As more people adopt 4G, you'll need more towers to service them because there's only so much bandwidth available.

    Shorter ranges allow frequencies to be reused more often. That means you'll have to build more towers, and run a lot more fiber, and that ain't cheap. NIMBYs really hate cell towers. AT&T and Verizon are instituting caps because they don't have the capacity in most areas, so limiting traffic or charging a LOT more for it helps pay for the expansion. They also want to protect their wired Internet services, which bring in a lot of money in areas where they've already invested in infrastructure. If you've got 4G at home, and can share it, you may be tempted to drop your wired connection. The telecoms sure don't want to give up that revenue stream.
    Did I forget that <<sarcasm>> tag again?

  2. #12

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Verizon's 4G LTE, currently being rolled out, is capable of 100 Mbps per 20 MHz channel. One 20 MHz channel is capable of supporting as many as 1,000 audio streams. A typical cell site will have several such channels, the exact number varying with location.

    The future's already here in many markets.
    "Its music what makes a radio station, and at Live FM, we play the last music around."
    After receiving that copy, I quit the VO industry.

  3. #13

    Re: How to kill an industry

    This thread has drifted away from the subject in the Forbes article.

    We shouldn't forget that Steve Jobs was a marketing wiz. Anyone who ever saw him at the annual Mac conference will tell you that was his forte. Wozniak built the Apple 2, but Jobs sold it. So Jobs was a salesman.

    We should also keep in mind that Bob Pittman of Clear Channel and Dan Mason of CBS are longtime radio programmers, not sales people.

    It's easy to come up with enemies, and blame sales people for killing an industry. But the reality is that the a media revolution took place ten years ago. It wasn't caused by corporations killing radio. It was caused by innovation in other areas. This isn't about live & local or anything else. It's about putting quality content in front of the public. That's the business we're in.

  4. #14
    nocomradio
    Guest

    Re: How to kill an industry

    I always figure this same sort of conversation was taking place over the checkerboard and nail keg in the local general store sometime around 1910 or so when the telegraph was on the way out and wireless was coming to be. Fast forward to where we are now and there is also a lack of nail kegs and and checkerboards and general stores. Why? The times are changing.

    We don't use buggy whips, kerosene lanterns, wringer wash machines, scythes, mules, dump rakes and other things of the era for the same reason, they have been replaced with new technology that works. I recently visited a friend who restores jukeboxes. They are beautiful pieces of functional art that still work as they did when new, along with having a charm that is lacking in any device today. But..........they weigh 300 lbs, use vinyl records, have tube amplifiers, a pile of mechanical contacts, lots of individual bulbs and many, many moving parts to wear out. I can understand why someone looked at one 25 years ago and said, "I can make a better, smaller and simpler device. We are seeing the same thing happen today. And we probably like it about as much as the jukebox repairman did in the late 70's.............

  5. #15
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    Re: How to kill an industry

    Quote Originally Posted by PTBoardOp94
    Verizon's 4G LTE, currently being rolled out, is capable of 100 Mbps per 20 MHz channel. One 20 MHz channel is capable of supporting as many as 1,000 audio streams. A typical cell site will have several such channels, the exact number varying with location.

    The future's already here in many markets.
    Yeah, at $50 a month for 5gb and $79 for $10gb. Let's see... on HD movie can be 1.3gb or so. That means about 4 movies for $50. It's cheaper to go to the theatre where the screen is more than 4" wide.

    I have had 4g on Verizon for 7 months. In LA, half the places I go have no signal. so it falls back. In The Desert there is no 4G. At my Prescott home, there is no 4G and the fallback sucks frogs. I still pay $10 a gb, no matter whether it works or not.

    Ma Bell was a bitch, and her kids grew up to be criminals.

    "The Future" arrived, but we had to send it back for more work as it appeared we were sent a late Alpha test of The Future, and the Beta has been delayed. I sometimes fear that The Future is vaporware, while the present is just a later release of Visicalc.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, Billboard, Cash Box, R&R, Record World, Music & Media, Audio, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, Popular Electronics, Studio Sound, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  6. #16
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    Re: How to kill an industry

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA
    This thread has drifted away from the subject in the Forbes article.

    We shouldn't forget that Steve Jobs was a marketing wiz. Anyone who ever saw him at the annual Mac conference will tell you that was his forte. Wozniak built the Apple 2, but Jobs sold it. So Jobs was a salesman.
    But Jobs imagined the iPod, iPhone, iTunes and the iPad. Wozniak did not create or build them. Jobs identified a market because he felt what kinds of technology would work. He took risks that most companies would not dare to try because they have too many MBAs and people in departments named "Legal" and "Risk Management" who will tell you why a risk is risky, and too many people in departments named "HR" telling you that you can't change job descriptions and require people to stay late to make deadlines or, simply, "to make it work."
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, Billboard, Cash Box, R&R, Record World, Music & Media, Audio, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, Popular Electronics, Studio Sound, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  7. #17

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    Yeah, at $50 a month for 5gb and $79 for $10gb. Let's see... on HD movie can be 1.3gb or so. That means about 4 movies for $50. It's cheaper to go to the theatre where the screen is more than 4" wide.
    To extend your example to, you know, radio: One hour of streaming audio will consume about $0.26 worth of bandwidth at today's prices.&#160;

    I have had 4g on Verizon for 7 months. In LA, half the places I go have no signal. so it falls back. In The Desert there is no 4G. At my Prescott home, there is no 4G and the fallback sucks frogs. I still pay $10 a gb, no matter whether it works or not.
    Worse, you pay $50 or $70 a month, even if you don't use it.

    "The Future" arrived, but we had to send it back for more work as it appeared we were sent a late Alpha test of The Future, and the Beta has been delayed. I sometimes fear that The Future is vaporware, while the present is just a later release of Visicalc.
    Indeed, a new version of "The Future" is being worked on that has 10x the wireless capacity of today's Future with very similar hardware prices
    "Its music what makes a radio station, and at Live FM, we play the last music around."
    After receiving that copy, I quit the VO industry.

  8. #18

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Tried to stream 3G 128 kbps WFMU today on the way home from work.
    20 miles trip from N Chicago suburb of Wheeling to N side of Chicago.

    6 good miles at 40 mph headed due east, two drop/rebuffers (meaning 10 or more seconds)

    11 "funny" miles on a N/S section of expressway 6 drops, 3 short, 3 long.

    3 good miles heading due east, 1 glitch of 3 seconds.

    Maybe these are dropouts, but more likley they are failures of the handoff system, where the system
    was supposed to be "noticing" which cell I was getting stronger in, so as to be able to hand off my account to that next cell,
    OR assign to a higher powered "over"-cell with higher power.

    Seems the seamless transfer thing must have gotten lost somehow.
    There probably isn't even any implementation of the original concept where small cells were to be
    overlapped by other cells where the radius was to be at least 5-10 times larger than the smaller cells.

    Max-to-min distance from downtown, 23mi to 7 mi. Either capacity is lacking or coordination.

    FM has multipath from planes and the 3G isn't worth much with so many occurances of abrupt silence.
    AM really offers my best value, I can hear so many different things instantly from SO many places, near and far,
    it's right there on the dashboard and it's free.

    Individualized bandwidth in wireless is essentially piggish and increases entropy, broadcast is essentially
    service to others and results in a higher ordering of values and worth for all.
    Valparaiso Technical Institute 1982, Analog engineer, AM pt 15, inventor with 2 issued patents, former SW pirate. Now offering antique radio repair/restoration and alignment.&nbsp; Stop just wishing that old radio worked!<br />AM1620 podcasts -&gt;&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; http://thomasjwells.podomatic.com/

  9. #19

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wells

    Individualized bandwidth in wireless is essentially piggish and increases entropy, broadcast is essentially
    service to others and results in a higher ordering of values and worth for all.
    Horses are safer than cars too.

    You can continue to program on a platform with diminishing audiences, or you can begin converting your own internal systems to where the people are going. It's not about us. It's about THEM. And THEY don't care about physics.

  10. #20

    Re: How to kill an industry

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    He took risks that most companies would not dare to try because they have too many MBAs and people in departments named "Legal" and "Risk Management" who will tell you why a risk is risky, and too many people in departments named "HR" telling you that you can't change job descriptions and require people to stay late to make deadlines or, simply, "to make it work."
    It was his money. He can take a risk. That's what being an entrepeneur is. Who are the radio entrepeneurs today? Who is using their own money to run radio stations?

    When he got rich, he put the MBAs in charge, and lost his company. He swore he wouldn't let that happen again. That's the context of his quote.

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