History of Baltimore Radio Questions (Help please) - Page 2
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Thread: History of Baltimore Radio Questions (Help please)

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by frankberry View Post
    WCAO-FM may have been running their music from tape but, in 1964, they probably had a "board operator" to take transmitter meter readings and sign the transmitter and program logs.
    By 1969, program automation systems were available. The station may well have been automated at that time.
    There were some pretty primitive automation systems before the time period you mention, but I do not think that any could have handled the rather complex time variables of classical without an operator.

    I ran two classical stations before 1970, one in Ecuador and one in Richmond, VA (for EZ Communications). Both played most material off records. In Richmond, we had a library of performances distributed on tape as well; the advantage being that a whole piece could be on one reel rather than across both sides of one or even two LP recordings. This allowed for a complete work to be run just as performed.

    While someone at WCAO (600 AM) might have done the meter readings for the FM, I doubt they could have dealt with the complexities of changing reels and cuing them in the time that a 60's era two-minute song lasted. So I think its likely they had a board operator.

    As an observation, some classical stations had board ops much of the time and had one or two announcers who did the presentations... even back when the voice tracks were on reel tape, not carts. The reason was that it was hard to find voice talent who could accurately pronounce the titles, composers and orchestra conductor names, and listeners were not tolerant of mistakes. So they voice tracked some or most of the day with real pros who could also comment from the recording liner notes, as well as HWV, BWV and other classification catalog numbers.
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  2. #12

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    Thanks for the interesting followup. I can vouch for the professionally correct, actually quite beautiful pronunciation of the taped announcer on WCAO-FM, a gift to a classical music student in those days (1964-69).

    Tony P.

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    There were some pretty primitive automation systems before the time period you mention, but I do not think that any could have handled the rather complex time variables of classical without an operator.

    I ran two classical stations before 1970, one in Ecuador and one in Richmond, VA (for EZ Communications). Both played most material off records. In Richmond, we had a library of performances distributed on tape as well; the advantage being that a whole piece could be on one reel rather than across both sides of one or even two LP recordings. This allowed for a complete work to be run just as performed.

    While someone at WCAO (600 AM) might have done the meter readings for the FM, I doubt they could have dealt with the complexities of changing reels and cuing them in the time that a 60's era two-minute song lasted. So I think its likely they had a board operator.

    As an observation, some classical stations had board ops much of the time and had one or two announcers who did the presentations... even back when the voice tracks were on reel tape, not carts. The reason was that it was hard to find voice talent who could accurately pronounce the titles, composers and orchestra conductor names, and listeners were not tolerant of mistakes. So they voice tracked some or most of the day with real pros who could also comment from the recording liner notes, as well as HWV, BWV and other classification catalog numbers.

  3. #13

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    Thanks for the interesting followup. I can vouch for the professionally correct, actually quite beautiful pronunciation of the taped announcer on WCAO-FM, a gift to a classical music student in those days (1964-69).

    Tony P.

    Quote Originally Posted by frankberry View Post
    WCAO-FM may have been running their music from tape but, in 1964, they probably had a "board operator" to take transmitter meter readings and sign the transmitter and program logs.
    By 1969, program automation systems were available. The station may well have been automated at that time.

  4. #14

    Wlpl 1976-1977

    Quote Originally Posted by stevewillett View Post
    Track down Euclid Coukouma, the former United Broadcasting Company Chief Engineer. He could probably tell you everything you need to know about WLPL.
    I was only at WLPL for June 1976 until January 1978 when I was transferred to WOOK-FM (aka OK-100) and WFAN-AM in DC. I stayed there about 8 years before I became bored with radio and became an maintenance engineer at NBC Television in DC. I posted some people and things I remeber about WLPL and a tiny amount about other Baltimore stations in another post in another thread earlier tonight.

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