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Thread: Media Reform in Argentina

  1. #1

    Media Reform in Argentina

    Argentina's Peronist Party (Justicialista) has passed a new media reform law that requires radio to play 70 percent nationally-produced content and television to produce 60 percent national content. The change will also require that Grupo Clarin divest, since "concesionarios" may only hold 10 broadcast licenses, instead of the current 24.

    http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/notas/632328.html

  2. #2

    Re: Media Reform in Argentina

    So......it is going to be like Canada, but a lot more Argentinans artist vs *others*. In other words I will hear an artist group like Miranda 10x a day?

  3. #3

    Re: Media Reform in Argentina

    Quote Originally Posted by e-dawg
    So......it is going to be like Canada, but a lot more Argentinans artist vs *others*. In other words I will hear an artist group like Miranda 10x a day?
    Argentina (like Canada) is blessed with a lot of homegrown talent. Most of the rock in Spanish is probably produced in the country, followed by Spain, Chile and Mexico. So it shouldn't be too much of a problem.

  4. #4

    Re: Media Reform in Argentina

    In the 90's, when I went to Argentina 2 or 3 times, I couldn't get enough of the local content.
    There was one AM station that was heavily "regressamos" (oldies), which meant major tango content, all the time.
    I don't think I heard even one song I recognized, and they were all great.
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  5. #5

    Re: Media Reform in Argentina

    A friend of mine from Buenas Aires brought me a few audio cassettes of FM radio stations when he was in the U.S. a few years ago. I don't know if he specifically chose stations he thought I'd like but I heard several FM stations that played nearly ALL English-language music, with only a few international Latin pop stars (Juanes, Enrique Iglesias, Gloria Estefan) thrown in.

    The announcers and commercials were all in Spanish but nearly all the music was in English. Even stations that don't do that, he told me, still play a lot of English-language music. Most Argentinians think of themselves as citizens of the world. Their grandparents or great-grandparents could have gone to America or Canada but just happened to wind up in Argentina after leaving Spain, Italy, Germany or another European country. They're proud of being Argentinian but they DON'T consider themselves Latin American and they don't want their pop culture to only be from Argentina or Latin America or even Spain.

    So I suppose these new media regulations aren't going to go over very well among city-dwellers and the better educated. In Canada, which has to work hard to avoid being taken over by U.S. pop culture, radio stations can play up to 65% American music. And after most TV stations get rid of their Can-Con requirements in the daytime with news and inexpensive cooking and talk shows, they load up on lots of U.S. TV programs in fringe time and prime time. Even the CBC is now running Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy. (Yes, Alex Trebek is from Canada and even worked for the CBC in his early career.)

    For Argentina to impose rules that are double what Canada requires seems to me too restrictive.




    Craig
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  6. #6

    Re: Media Reform in Argentina

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg
    A friend of mine from Buenas Aires brought me a few audio cassettes of FM radio stations when he was in the U.S. a few years ago. I don't know if he specifically chose stations he thought I'd like but I heard several FM stations that played nearly ALL English-language music, with only a few international Latin pop stars (Juanes, Enrique Iglesias, Gloria Estefan) thrown in.

    The announcers and commercials were all in Spanish but nearly all the music was in English. Even stations that don't do that, he told me, still play a lot of English-language music. Most Argentinians think of themselves as citizens of the world. Their grandparents or great-grandparents could have gone to America or Canada but just happened to wind up in Argentina after leaving Spain, Italy, Germany or another European country. They're proud of being Argentinian but they DON'T consider themselves Latin American and they don't want their pop culture to only be from Argentina or Latin America or even Spain.

    So I suppose these new media regulations aren't going to go over very well among city-dwellers and the better educated. In Canada, which has to work hard to avoid being taken over by U.S. pop culture, radio stations can play up to 65% American music. And after most TV stations get rid of their Can-Con requirements in the daytime with news and inexpensive cooking and talk shows, they load up on lots of U.S. TV programs in fringe time and prime time. Even the CBC is now running Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy. (Yes, Alex Trebek is from Canada and even worked for the CBC in his early career.)

    For Argentina to impose rules that are double what Canada requires seems to me too restrictive.




    Craig
    [email protected]
    Yes and no. I should know. I was married to one and spent several years in the country. Even worked on the air there. While English music is huge, there is much support for "rock nacional." The new regulations will put a crimp in the English language stations though.

    As for the culture, the further one moves away from Buenos Aires, the more "latino" the country feels. Although there is the feeling most are transplanted Europeans, cumbia, folklorica, tango, chamame and other native music dominates outside Bs. As. Most Argentines, other than the citydwellers, could careless. They'll be happy with Soda Stereo, Yupahnqui, Gardel, and the like.

  7. #7
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    Re: Media Reform in Argentina

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wells
    In the 90's, when I went to Argentina 2 or 3 times, I couldn't get enough of the local content.
    There was one AM station that was heavily "regressamos" (oldies), which meant major tango content, all the time.
    A lot has changed. In the last 10 to 15 years, all full signal Buenos Aires AMs have gone talk or sports (although the neighborhood AMs are mostly either religious or programmed for Bolivians, etc.).

    Tango is pretty much gone from all but one full market FM. The array of the top 5 or 6 stations includes several CHRs, one with more English music than the others, an all Spanish AC, a talk-heavy rock station with mostly English rock and some Spanish, and a 100% Argentine rock station, all Spanish.

    There are a bunch of stations playing English AC, but they are in the second tier.
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    Re: Media Reform in Argentina

    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg
    A friend of mine from Buenas Aires brought me a few audio cassettes of FM radio stations when he was in the U.S. a few years ago. I don't know if he specifically chose stations he thought I'd like but I heard several FM stations that played nearly ALL English-language music, with only a few international Latin pop stars (Juanes, Enrique Iglesias, Gloria Estefan) thrown in.
    Those would not be the top rated FMs, which I described in another post.

    Most Argentinians think of themselves as citizens of the world. Their grandparents or great-grandparents could have gone to America or Canada but just happened to wind up in Argentina after leaving Spain, Italy, Germany or another European country. They're proud of being Argentinian but they DON'T consider themselves Latin American and they don't want their pop culture to only be from Argentina or Latin America or even Spain.
    They do believe they are Latin American, but they also believe they are culturally superior to the rest. This comes from the time, around the turn of the century... 1900, of course... when the Argentine standard of living was the 8th highest in the world.

    For Argentina to impose rules that are double what Canada requires seems to me too restrictive.
    Off and on, many nations in Latin America have had similar rules. They frequently don't last.

    But overall few stations in the whole country play much English music. And they are mostly in a few big cities, and can adapt by doing a blend.

    It reminds me of my first Top 40 station in Latin America (Ecuador), where I played not just Spanish langauge hits but those from France, Italy and the US. But the Spanish material was 75% of what we played, and outside the two major cities, no English language music was played, and in those cities, maybe a total of 5 of 80 stations played any.




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