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Thread: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

  1. #1
    1900radio
    Guest

    How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    Are things more stable now that people are having trouble selling houses?

    Or maybe people are just happy to have jobs?

  2. #2

    Re: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    Did you see the headlines in the radio trades this week about August revenue dropping 11 percent, and 90 percent of all stations being effected?

    That's related to the housing bust--one of those industries with its tenacles throughout the American economy. When the home builder lays off the carpenter, he doesn't stop at the bar on Friday for a beer, so the bar lays off the cook, who decides not to buy a new car...

    And when radio companies have double-digit decreases in revenue, jocks get laid off... and the cycle continues...

  3. #3

    Re: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    So far 600,000 jobs lost!!
    Housing, real estate, banking, autos, advertising, you name it.

    By the hour it's getting ugly and scary.

  4. #4

    Re: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    It means when you are tossed out in the street, you better plan on starving. Many of the jobs radio people rely on between gigs are gone. Unemployment in Kern County in California is 10.4%, Mohave County in Arizona is 7.4%. With rates like that; you better plan on starting your own business, or stand in very long lines for the few remaining jobs.

    Nothing like 2000 people standing in line for 50 $8.00 jobs at the big box store!


    Steve
    www.outlawradio.us

  5. #5

    Re: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    Hey there,

    Not a usual voice on this part of the RI board, but it caught my eye.

    From Houston:
    While we here in "dees Texas parts" don't have it as bad as the other parts of the country, it hurts everywhere.
    Friend of mine just lost his slot at a country station here - he was a News Dir.
    Metro Networks put nearly everyone out of work this week.
    And for those that do have "stable", well, not even stable, more like, if you have a current radio job, your hours are decreasing. And don't think of asking for a raise.

    It's tough.

    I've talked with plenty of radio friends and a lot of them tell me that this is why you get out of the business.
    Yes, jobs are being lost in many a place, but radio hurts worse. The unstable-ness, if you will, is just crazy.

    I'm down to a p/t "board op" gig and emailing my resume to the masses.
    I'll most likely take a p/t job in an out-of-radio field this holiday season; you know, one of those temp gigs where companies hire from Oct-Jan...

    /sigh/ What can ya do?

  6. #6

    Re: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    Rollye James, was on the air talking about her newly unemployed fellow broadcasters in their early 50's who are really getting the short end with blatant age discrimination. It seems nobody wants to hire someone with a history in radio on their resume, and in their 50's to boot. Workmen's compensation insurance companies don't want to insure those getting up there in age.

    I have a feeling allot of children out there are going to find rather bare trees this Christmas. Even those who still have jobs are finding their dollars spread rather thin with the sharp increases in fuel and food.

    There are options for newly unemployed broadcasters, including: Starting your own low power radio station, or doing voice work for the phone on hold industry. Of coarse it assumes you saw your demise in broadcasting coming and saved a few bucks aside. It will cost between $1500 - $2000 to set up a fairly well equipped part 15 AM radio station, but you can make a fair living with it, in the right market. One part 15 AM radio station I know sets up by a 20-plex and broadcast the theater schedule on the weekends, along with real running times and reviews, after every three or four screens a 30 second spot is aired. Parents love it! Because they learn what movie is kid friendly, along with the start and true running time of the movie while dropping their kids off. There is also the talking car lot, broadcasting high school football games, special events like horse shows etc, for the part 15 AM broadcaster, and it's legal!

    Here in the west, the talk is; "We are just getting started with this recession". Realtors in are market, tell us northing is moving, and they don't expect a change for years. A large chain of Chevrolet dealerships just folded up two lots in Vegas, along with twelve others across the nation. Chain furniture stores are folding up left and right, no need for a new sofa or dresser if your home just floated off, or is the newest fish habitat.

    Hold on tight! It's going to get rough out there, long before it gets better. But setting out on your own is one option, our Radio Brandy broadcast workshop website has resources for those wishing to set out on their own; including: transmitter and equipment reviews and program resources, with more coming.

    If you have a show you would like to share with other broadcasters, let us know, we will be happy to post it. We also have plenty of space for hosting part 15 radio station websites, and your resume. Let us know how we can help.


    Steve
    www.radiobrandy.com



  7. #7

    Re: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    Before investing lots of money to set up a home studio for voiceovers, may I offer the following:

    1. Are you connected to numerous clients?
    2. Advertising agencies?
    3. Reputable agents?
    4. What are your rates?

    There are maybe 20 great v.o. artists, the late Don LaFontaine was at the top,
    who rightfully rake in the bulk of the business & money.
    Another hundred or so have enough business and contacts to do it fulltime.

    There are thousands of out of work radio folks willing to take $50 or less for a v.o.
    That won't pay the bills.




  8. #8

    Re: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    In my case I'm lucky enough to have a full time radio job but being in a small market it does not pay very well and I had to pick up a second job at one of the local big box stores so my wife and I could keep up with the rising cost of everything. I make more at the big box store working part time than I do my radio station job. But, as was mentioned earlier you don't dare ask for a raise. In fact contrary to common belief it can sometimes hurt to ask. I read an article on I think it was MSN money that gave the top ten things you should not do when asking for a raise and near the top it said just asking can get you canned. I have thought about getting out of radio. After all I don't want to work seventy two hours between two jobs forever but in this area there is not much else and my wife is resistant to moving. She likes the area and likes our house and we are close to our nieces and nephew, we have to kids ourselves. To make moving worth it. One of us would have to find something really well paying. I'm in the, lucky to have a job department. Picking up a second job is an option if you can work on maybe five hours of sleep a day. I'm lucky that I can pull that off but I know not everyone can do that.

    It's not just radio people working two jobs either. Many of my co workers at the big box store are working two jobs to make ends meet.
    www.wbzg.net<br />check out the podcast at <br />www.candidradio.com

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Where Appalachia collides with Atlanta
    Posts
    4,509

    Re: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    Quote Originally Posted by XRQKFM

    It seems nobody wants to hire someone with a history in radio on their resume, and in their 50's to boot. Workmen's compensation insurance companies don't want to insure those getting up there in age.
    Steve: you put a lot of good thought into your post, However, let me take issue with these two thoughts.

    I spent a number of years in broadcasting and then got out. I have since spent a lifetime struggling with the hiring process. The problem is NOT that someone has radio on their resume.... the problem is NOT HAVING some other experience/skill on your resume that is marketable. They want to see that you are an accountant who can turn around a messy set of books. Is that on your resume? They want to see that you are a computer programmer turned System Analyst that can bring a new software build in ON TIME, ON or UNDER budget. Is that on your resume? They want to see that you have been a street fighter who can sell refrigerators to Eskimos. Is that on your resume? If what they are looking for IS ON YOUR RESUME, they don't care that you used to grind records on the radio, or you preached at the Assembly of God Church, or worked as a golf pro at the small town country club.

    The HEALTH INSURANCE issue becomes real for those of us of some age, but this is not an issue for Workers Compensation Insurance. Workers Comp is based on WHAT YOU DO, now who you are. If you are hanging off the side of buildings six stories up, your employer gets hit with a heavy premium that does not even ask the age of the workers. If you are a nurse or nurses aid in a nursing home, heavy premium! Lots of cuts, needle sticks and sprained backs. None of these are age dependent. In fact, they know that the younger nurses are the one who will run up the bills for on-the-job injuries in a nursing home. They have yet to learn how to lift a patient correctly. They have yet to come to respect used injection needles.
    Life is too short to waste time dancing with ugly posts

  10. #10

    Re: How does the economy/housing market affect Radio jobs?

    but this is not an issue for Workers Compensation Insurance.
    Here in California it is! Workers Compensation Insurance is very high in California, in the first place,
    and goes up with age and risk; they feel those over 50 are more clumsy and at a greater risk
    for a work place accident. They will increase rates for those over fifty or deny coverage.
    The problem is NOT that someone has radio on their resume.
    Many employers feel that radio people will leave whenever an opportunity presence itself.
    They are often considered unstable and flighty. those words straight from a recruiter for a
    major big box chain here in California.

    Even the state of California's various agencies that deal with employment, are very aware of
    widespread age discrimination in the state by employers. It's also very hard to prove it in court,
    very few employers are willing to go out on the limb and say:We are not going to hire because
    of your age, at least on paper.


    Steve
    www.xrqk.com

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