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Thread: Boycotting Clear Channel is too little, too late

  1. #71

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    Re: Boycotting Clear Channel is too little, too late

    Even if a parking garage company owned the country stations in my or your market,. they wouldn't be playing Porter Waggoner or George Jones, because they don't appeal to an audience that advertisers are interested in. That aspect of the business would not change, even if you could go back to 7/7/7 ownership rules (in fact, more than likely we'd go back to four A/C's per market.

  2. #72

    Re: Boycotting Clear Channel is too little, too late

    Quote Originally Posted by gr8oldies
    Even if a parking garage company owned the country stations in my or your market,. they wouldn't be playing Porter Waggoner or George Jones, because they don't appeal to an audience that advertisers are interested in. That aspect of the business would not change, even if you could go back to 7/7/7 ownership rules (in fact, more than likely we'd go back to four A/C's per market.
    Yeah, right! It's all about the advertisers, not about the listeners. An attitude like that is part of the reason why terrestrial radio is in such sorry shape these days.

  3. #73
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    Re: Boycotting Clear Channel is too little, too late

    Quote Originally Posted by radionut925


    Yeah, right! It's all about the advertisers, not about the listeners. An attitude like that is part of the reason why terrestrial radio is in such sorry shape these days.
    Man, get over it. "It" has always been about advertisers. No format can survive if it does not have advertiser acceptance or reach the kind of people that advertisers want.

    Go did up some 50's and 60's "Broadcasting" magazines and read the articles. Formats were driven by advertiser acceptance. Nothing has changed.

    Now, tho get advertisers, you have to have listeners. To get lots of advertisers, you need lots of listeners. These listeners must be in certain age ranges, but beyond that, the key to making money is simple; deliver lots of listeners in the right age groups. TO deliver listeners, you have to have good programming, and that is where the listener comes in.

    But there are formats like standards and oldies in most markets and even country in some markets that will not attract advertisers, because the listeners are too few or too old.
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  4. #74
    dbdigital
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    Re: Boycotting Clear Channel is too little, too late

    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo
    Quote Originally Posted by dbdigital

    However you want to mince up the formats into sub-genre, the Coalition's study goes hand-in-hand with the FCC's own Powell-suppressed report on media consolidation that since the passing of the Telcom Act of 1996, format choices of decreased, listenership is down, and fewer entities own radio stations.

    db
    Face it: nobody is going to do formats that don't work commercially, whether they be standards and oldies, or "real" jazz or bluegrass. These are simply not viable formats, and unless a commercial station can make money, it is not going to do any format. If a format is viable, someone will do it.
    Bingo! And that's why radio stations are loathe to venture too far from the pool of established hits and limited formats. It isn't profitable enough. And I use the word "enough" because it is possible to make money from these formats, maybe not to the extent to satisfy a media giant and its shareholders but enough to satisfy a smaller company.

    A case in point is Saul Levine bringing Country back to Los Angeles. The format may not have financially satisfied Emmis but obviously Levine sees green in Country. And in the process, he maintains a degree, however small, of format diversity in that city.

    But unless radio stations get out of their format comfort zone and start getting more adventurous they stand to lose even more listeners than has already occurred. And, BTW, I don't buy that listenership has diminished simply because there are more distractions since most radio listening is done as background, while performing other activities. What I see happening is that people are discovering new music, such as Chill, Trance etc., and are not finding it on terrestrial radio causing them to hear it by other means. Of course, an ego-bloated, self-important programmer employed by a media conglomerate will dismiss this as ridiculous but so be it.

    db

  5. #75

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    Re: Boycotting Clear Channel is too little, too late

    Guys, you're all remembering a past with all kinds of obscure formats and stations playing all unknowns, all the time that simply didn't exist. I don't doubt that there are micro-niche tastes, but not enough that it's commercially viable, or that the folks who can't be satisfied with anything other than their own iPod could ever be satisfied with anything radio did. Send these stations all back to Mom and Pop or Proctor and Gamble and they'll still be doing what's profitable, all the while still competing with iPods, the internet, and everything else.

  6. #76

    Re: Boycotting Clear Channel is too little, too late

    Quote Originally Posted by gr8oldies
    Guys, you're all remembering a past with all kinds of obscure formats and stations playing all unknowns, all the time that simply didn't exist. I don't doubt that there are micro-niche tastes, but not enough that it's commercially viable, or that the folks who can't be satisfied with anything other than their own iPod could ever be satisfied with anything radio did. Send these stations all back to Mom and Pop or Proctor and Gamble and they'll still be doing what's profitable, all the while still competing with iPods, the internet, and everything else.
    That's the point exactly. If terrestrial radio is to remain viable, it has to offer what iPod's, the internet, and satellite radio can't, which is live and local programming. And even that task can't be accomplished if stations are run almost entirely on a computer and/or satellite dish.

  7. #77

    Re: Boycotting Clear Channel is too little, too late

    I've been in the radio business now for almost 35 years. When I started my career, the typical formats
    were:

    Top 40, Album Rock, Full Service Adult, Country, Religious, Talk, Black, Beautiful Music and that was about it.

    Today's formats include (and this is just off the top of my head):

    CHR Mainstream, CHR Urban, A/C, Lite A/C, Hot A/C, Country, Classic Country, Americana, Classic Rock, Classic Rock "That Rocks", Classic Hits, Alternative Rock, Mainstream Rock, Christian CHR, Christian A/C, Urban Hip Hop, Urban A/C, Conservative Talk, Liberal Talk, All News Radio, Jammin' Oldies, 80's Hits, Oldies (still in a few markets), Adult Standards, Soft A/C, Religious, NPR, Spanish CHR, Spanish A/C, Hawaiian, Tropical...(and I know there's more I'm forgetting.) How can anyone say there's fewer choices in formats?

    Do some of these formats share titles? Of course, common sense would say that would be so.

    The greater formats came about from more stations coming on the dial from "docket 80/90", which made
    everyone program to more "niche" markets.

    I have no doubt as HD Radio comes on-line, there'll be more "niches" to occupy. More stations means more
    programming choice. Some stations will be jukeboxes, others could be live. But it'll all depend on radio coming up with unique, interesting programming...manufacturers getting the radios in stores at a price the average person can afford, and radio doing its' part to promote the new choices. HD is at the stage right now that FM was at in 1968. So, no one should be surprised the whole thing hasn't been figured out yet.

    What the FCC will do about media ownership only they know at this point. I have been both a supporter of and critic of certain things Clear Channel has done over the years. They've made their share of successes...
    and their share of mistakes. Regardless of what the FCC decides, there will still be large companies running radio stations. How big? Can't say. That's the FCC's job.

    For myself as a broadcaster, I don't fear computers, the internet or i-Pods. I think, if broadcasters are smart, we'll harness some of that activity to help us boost our own platforms.

    But, the overall answer is not putting stations on the air with 10,000 song playlists (as XM and Sirius have)
    to play to the 2 or 3% of radio listeners who think "radio sucks". And, though I have felt from the beginning there's a market for satcasting, the declining sales and lukewarm renewal rates for the current satgroup are evidence (though not proof) that the market they were seeking wasn't the size they though it was. Most listeners don't care. They want what they want when they want it. And, it's our job to give them what they want, when they want it. Playlist size can vary...but that's up to the operator's in individual markets to decide. And that what is done in the majority of cases today...whether radio "wannabes" want to believe it, or not.

    The 10,000 song crowd? That's what your i-Pod is for. Go load it up.

    I recognize some people will disagree with me. That's just one long-time broadcaster's opinion. And, there you have it.

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