Radio Leaves Money On the Table - Page 4
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Thread: Radio Leaves Money On the Table

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by SaltyDog View Post
    That's an interesting take. Perhaps Jeff Bezos has no idea what to do with Whole Foods now that he's made an offer. My guess is that he does have a pretty good idea. Maybe he's wrong but I doubt he made an offer so that he could "figure it out" later.
    He has an idea what HE wants to do, but we'll see how his idea fits with the reality. This is the same guy who wants to deliver packages with drones. I order things from Amazon all the time and have yet to have a package delivered by a drone. So that may have been one of his ideas that fell by the wayside. There are many things he doesn't know or understand about the grocery business. Fortunately this is a smaller grocery company, so if he's wrong, or discovers he's in over his head, he won't drown completely.

    Westergren's qualifications are as a musician. He wanted a music delivery system that was good for musicians. His problem is that he's working for the wrong company. He couldn't find a way to be generous with musicians and make a profit for his investors. He should be working for SoundExchange. Perhaps that's where we'll see him next.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Westergren's qualifications are as a musician. He wanted a music delivery system that was good for musicians. His problem is that he's working for the wrong company. He couldn't find a way to be generous with musicians and make a profit for his investors. He should be working for SoundExchange. Perhaps that's where we'll see him next.
    I was completely wrong about Pandora myself. Way before all those competitors came on the scene, I thought Westergren was building up a huge barrier to entry with the Music Genome Project® run by human musicologists. It didn't work out that way did it.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Yes, here it is. Proof that radio companies are leaving money on the table. I've been saying this for years, and now we have actual statistics. Radio companies are not taking advantage of their incredible local branding by selling digital with broadcast. The reason it happens from what I can see is radio companies have put their digital platform under a different department from broadcast. Sometimes it's under technology, sometimes it's under marketing, but it's usually not included in the same food chain with broadcast. So the sales rep who is pitching the station to an advertiser doesn't mention web ads or podcasts or anything else because they only sell spots. Big mistake. Radio stations need to read this article, and then realign their departments so digital is part of the plan.

    http://radioink.com/2017/05/18/hes-j...tal-baby-ugly/
    I've read through the thread a couple times, and get the jist of what applies to online streaming and radio... what about the HD?

    Nearly every car has it, and a lot of interesting stuff is on there, but is it really being marketed or utilized as much as it could? Some HD broadcasts here in Seattle aren't even mentioned online, even on the station's website, or included on its drop down menus. It's nice they have their HD channels going, but do they even market the broadcasts?

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by boombox4 View Post
    I've read through the thread a couple times, and get the jist of what applies to online streaming and radio... what about the HD?
    In order to sell radio to advertisers, you need documentation. That means ratings. So far, HD Radio mainly shows up when it's connected to an FM translator. I'm not sure what percentage of cars have it, but it's a lot less than "every car." Mine, for one, doesn't. I'm sure someone can google us a number. Is it being marketed? Depends on the station or company. Certainly NPR stations have been pretty active with it. Some stations have streaming links on their websites. Some don't.

    In any case, HD radio isn't considered digital media, compared to podcasts, streaming, or web sites. Why? Because it still uses over the air frequencies.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by boombox4 View Post
    I've read through the thread a couple times, and get the jist of what applies to online streaming and radio... what about the HD?

    Nearly every car has it, and a lot of interesting stuff is on there, but is it really being marketed or utilized as much as it could?
    Nearly every car does not have it. Only this year has HD approached the figure of half of all installs. And new car sales are off about 8% this year.

    Since about 5% of all cars are replaced each year, and the average car age is nearing 11 years. So we can assume that maybe 10% to 12% of all cars have HD capability, and home and workplace radios and smartphones have 0% capability. That is a very small universe.
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  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    Nearly every car does not have it. Only this year has HD approached the figure of half of all installs. And new car sales are off about 8% this year.

    Since about 5% of all cars are replaced each year, and the average car age is nearing 11 years. So we can assume that maybe 10% to 12% of all cars have HD capability, and home and workplace radios and smartphones have 0% capability. That is a very small universe.
    That would presently be around 25 million cars in the US with HD Radios, spread out over the main metros (and other areas as well), so I can see your point.

    So, does HD have a future at all? Or is it something that will die out like AM Stereo did? In my metro there are at least three HD broadcasts with ethnic programming.

    I just got a used HD Radio. I can see the appeal of the extra channels, especially in a 'full' FM band, in a country where the population is definitely NOT shrinking. It just looks like there is this potential resource for revenues that is sort of being put on the shelf.

    Or is online streaming going to kill everything.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by boombox4 View Post

    So, does HD have a future at all?
    I'm reserving judgment until the patent runs out. I think it has a chance. Connecting HD stations to FM translators has brought new life to HD.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by boombox4 View Post
    T

    Or is online streaming going to kill everything.
    If that question had an answer, Pandora would not be loosing more and more money with every new user.

    Pandora's apparent solution is to add more commercial minutes. It then sounds more like terrestrial radio, which does have a profitable business model.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
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  9. #39
    At this year's Texas Association of Broadcaster's Convention there was an interesting session about "AM Radio Revitalization. One suggestion was to go all digital. I think that is a bit premature, but if you have good coverage from FM translator(s), it might be something to eventually consider.

    A HD Radio representative was there, who said the licensing cost for radio stations had recently been reduced to $7000. If you have a digital ready transmitter, the Importer and Exporter were now around $15,000 for the pair. Of course, those prices don't mention whatever modifications or improvements you'd need to do to the transmitter and antenna system. While I commend them for recognizing that cost is a major factor in getting stations to convert. I think it still too expensive, especially for non-major market stations. I suggested that if they want this thing to fly, they need to subsidize its adoption for broadcasters. It's hard to sell radios if there is nothing to listen to. I suspect that suggestion fell on deaf ears.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck View Post
    At this year's Texas Association of Broadcaster's Convention there was an interesting session about "AM Radio Revitalization. One suggestion was to go all digital.
    That idea has come up from time to time, and while the expense is minimal for broadcasters, it requires consumers to buy new radios. That's the same issue for HD. We can see how well it's worked for HD. The general view is people don't buy single-use radio devices any more. Combine a radio with something else (like a car or a phone) and you'll sell a few. That's also the case for satellite and internet radios. Radio-only devices are non-starters, and the electronics industry has no motivation to sell them any more.

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