AM970 The Answer - Page 4
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 46

Thread: AM970 The Answer

  1. #31
    My point, David, and I was pretty clear on it, was that tax deductions can only be taken against tax owed. Corporate tax is only on income, so if there is no income, there is no tax to be paid, although loss carry forwards can offset income in later years. Some expenses might be able to offset some property taxes, but a commercial radio entity is far more likely to be a net contributor to tax coffers as opposed to a recipient of tax income.

  2. #32
    Moderator/Assistant Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    34,983
    Quote Originally Posted by umfan View Post
    My point, David, and I was pretty clear on it, was that tax deductions can only be taken against tax owed. Corporate tax is only on income, so if there is no income, there is no tax to be paid, although loss carry forwards can offset income in later years. Some expenses might be able to offset some property taxes, but a commercial radio entity is far more likely to be a net contributor to tax coffers as opposed to a recipient of tax income.
    You do not specify gross income or net income, generally referred to as "gross" and "net". Tax liability is calculated only on net income, after all allowable expenses.

    So there is no "tax owed" on gross income. All expenses are consolidated, deducted from gross income and the result is net income. Only then is the amount of tax owed known.

    The only instances where gross income is taxed is in things like business licensees where the fee is based on the volume of business. And, of course, those fees are part of a business' expenses.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, RCA Broadcast News, Television Magazine, Radio Annual, Radio News, Sponsor, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, M Street Directory, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  3. #33
    This thread has more filaments than a boxcar full of light bulbs (using references from the Golden Age of Radio.) Just sayin'.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by umfan View Post
    a commercial radio entity is far more likely to be a net contributor to tax coffers as opposed to a recipient of tax income.
    But your point ignores the fact that non-commercial stations perform a lot of services in exchange for the tax dollars they get. It's not radio welfare. The Reagan folks made sure of that. All of the people who came into Congress four years ago hell bent on defunding discovered that they actually liked this system, which is why they continued appropriating the money. And my expectation is they will continue regardless of what the proposed budget says.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    But your point ignores the fact that non-commercial stations perform a lot of services in exchange for the tax dollars they get. It's not radio welfare. The Reagan folks made sure of that. All of the people who came into Congress four years ago hell bent on defunding discovered that they actually liked this system, which is why they continued appropriating the money. And my expectation is they will continue regardless of what the proposed budget says.
    What service(s) does NPR provide that is/are not already provided by the private sector?

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by wavo View Post
    What service(s) does NPR provide that is/are not already provided by the private sector?
    You can start with the fact that they provide programming that private sector stations have stopped doing because there's no profit in it. Classical, jazz, folk music. They do the kind of in-depth world news that would only otherwise be available from other government-funded organizations, like the BBC or the CBC.

    But depending on the state, there are information networks that would be unprofitable for private stations to run. State taxes pay for them, but there are federal matching dollars that help.

    There is also the station-owned satellite distribution network that's available for all independent radio producers.

  7. #37
    This is an excerpt from the testimony by the CEO of CPB to Congress. The full testimony is available online, if you wish to read it in entirety. But here's the key part of the funding system:

    "Stations use CPB funding for local operations and to produce and acquire programming, which allows them to raise additional operational funds from corporations, foundations, state and local governments and from individual contributions, which are the largest source of non-CPB funding for public media. On average, every federal dollar invested in CPB is leveraged by stations to raise six dollars locally. This successful public-private partnership is uniquely entrepreneurial and uniquely American. Though models vary, funding for other countries’ public broadcasting systems comes almost exclusively from their governments, from licensing fees or from dedicated taxes. At $1.39 per American, the cost of our country’s service is proportionally small compared to other developed nations."

    So as I said, this is not radio welfare. Every federal dollar is matched by $6 locally. Every person who works in public broadcasting pays taxes on the money they make. Just because they work for a non-profit does not exempt them from paying taxes on the money they make as citizens.

  8. #38
    Piscopo incessantly cracking up, which comes across generally as fake laughter, and clapping his hands and stomping his feet contributes to the show being unlistenable for long periods of time, esp. when nothing funny or even remotely witty is said. He even cracks up while interviewing guests, which is particularly distracting and annoying. Debbie Duhaime obviously received the memo to laugh like a hyena too.

  9. #39
    The list of advertisers on Piscopo's show seems very small and unimpressive consisting of just a few mom and pop restaurants, a local car dealership, a chiropractor and a few direct-response advertisers. And his ad rates can't possibly be high given his low ratings, I don't see how the show can be profitable.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by L Chanon Gade View Post
    There are only a few hundred people listening...why are you one of them?

    The toilet flush comparison is apt.

    LCG
    Joe said "hundreds of thousands" listen to his show. That, I find hard to believe.

Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  




     
Our Conferences
Useful Contacts
Community


Contact Us