ATL. 6+ ratings - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: ATL. 6+ ratings

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by wavo View Post
    What causes these down cycles? I have heard that before about other formats, country included, but it doesn't mesh with my "people are creatures of habit" theory. Most people I have known over the years habitually listen to "their" station(s) and do not switch stations except when something new, with a lot of social buzz, appears on the scene.
    Is my theory all wrong? I can't think of what has happened that is shiny enough to attract people to switch stations
    Sometimes the music that's popular at the time has an effect on the ratings.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by wavo View Post
    What causes these down cycles?
    It's a format that's mainly currents-based. So if the currents are mainly by lesser known artists, or songs that aren't as strong as from earlier times, it will have an effect on the ratings. Plus, there's also the factor of competition. So if country fans are also Christmas fans, they may switch from country for Christmas, and then return at a later time.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by RoddyFreeman View Post
    Sometimes the music that's popular at the time has an effect on the ratings.
    I understand both your, and Big A's point. I guess I'm scratching my head because most people I know are either country fans, hip hop fans, R&B fans, jazz fans...or they like pop music. They don't have a tendency to try other genres of music. I know there are exceptions, I being one but it seems most people like whatever music their social group likes and it only changes very slowly, over time.
    Am I wrong?

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by wavo View Post
    Am I wrong?
    In a world with many options, all you need is a weak group of songs, and listeners (especially young ones) will find what they want someplace else. So they're probably not trying other genres, but other platforms.

    Right now, country stations are finding that they're getting better numbers by decreasing currents and broadening their Gold a little bit.

    But that could change if some big new thing happens.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    In a world with many options, all you need is a weak group of songs, and listeners (especially young ones) will find what they want someplace else. So they're probably not trying other genres, but other platforms.

    Right now, country stations are finding that they're getting better numbers by decreasing currents and broadening their Gold a little bit.

    But that could change if some big new thing happens.
    Here's a question you may know the answer to...who actually picks the singles today? Record execs...group PDs...local PDs?

  6. #16
    In the larger markets there is usually a “Music Director” who does the music logs. He / She could also be the assistant PD, Production director, promotions director or an on air person. Some companies will have “format” directors that will have control of the songs that can be played all of that type of stations that company owns. 97.1 The River when they first started out as a jukebox with no announcers only had the music guy, and the contract liner guy. Most large market stations have some type of music research. I guess somewhere there are even operations that still have a music “staff” meeting where several of the on air folks listen and have input on what is added. For non “current stations” there are computer programs that rotate your library. A lot of small market operations in the past usually followed Billboard. It just depends on the particular station and its corporate structure.

    If a record rep did your music, I am sure the FCC would be informed by the other record reps and there would be an "investigation".

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by secondchoice View Post
    In the larger markets there is usually a “Music Director” who does the music logs. He / She could also be the assistant PD, Production director, promotions director or an on air person. Some companies will have “format” directors that will have control of the songs that can be played all of that type of stations that company owns. 97.1 The River when they first started out as a jukebox with no announcers only had the music guy, and the contract liner guy. Most large market stations have some type of music research. I guess somewhere there are even operations that still have a music “staff” meeting where several of the on air folks listen and have input on what is added. For non “current stations” there are computer programs that rotate your library. A lot of small market operations in the past usually followed Billboard. It just depends on the particular station and its corporate structure.

    If a record rep did your music, I am sure the FCC would be informed by the other record reps and there would be an "investigation".
    I thought the record companies, along with the artists, picked the singles they would "encourage" stations to play. I know a station could play anything they want and I also understand payola law. I always thought the record labels used their "gut" instinct and pushed stations to play certain singles, and in a certain order. I've never been involved in that side of the business which is why I ask.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by wavo View Post
    Here's a question you may know the answer to...who actually picks the singles today? Record execs...group PDs...local PDs?
    Are you asking about country? If so, label promo heads pick the singles, usually getting input from selected radio people.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Are you asking about country? If so, label promo heads pick the singles, usually getting input from selected radio people.
    Is there a different process in other formats?

  10. #20
    Moderator/Assistant Administrator
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    34,438
    Quote Originally Posted by wavo View Post
    Is there a different process in other formats?
    In essentially all formats that have current releases, the label determines the individual songs to be "released to radio" and sets the timing.

    Radio generally does not get full albums. The labels (and, sometimes but more rarely, artist management) send digital files, usually in .wav format.

    Many labels now release individual songs by power artists worldwide at the same time.

    Radio stations have internal procedures to determine what new songs to add. They may let the PD pick the adds, or have a committee or follow corporate guidance. Stations will look at various online sources (BDS, MediaBasse, download stats, etc. to see how songs are doing and who is adding them).

    Record labels have promotion staffers who call, visit and email stations and programmers to encourage them to play the latest releases.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, RCA Broadcast News, Television Magazine, Radio Annual, Radio News, Sponsor, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, M Street Directory, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  




     
Our Conferences
Useful Contacts
Community


Contact Us