How To Make Broadcast Towers More Bird-Friendly: Turn Off Some Lights - Page 2
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Thread: How To Make Broadcast Towers More Bird-Friendly: Turn Off Some Lights

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by xmtrland View Post
    I see more birds die from the power lines.
    And TTBOMK most power lines and towers don't have lights. At least not the ones near me.

  2. #12
    I have seen a handful of birds hit glass windows in skyscrapers and even small, one story buildings. Can't recall EVER seeing any birds not happily content chilling on a tower. Wires may be another story on the towers. I guess that would be bad vision issues. Strobey lights are everyone's friends. Think these ultra bright LED lights will cause billions of mishaps? I guess traffic lights will be the next thing under attack.

  3. #13
    The day after the Lake Gun tower killed 2,300 birds, engineers removed the bird feeder from the top of the antenna mast saying, "We thought we were helping to preserve the bird population."

    But seriously, how does NPR justify this article? NPR is supposed to be the arbiter of all things correct. Is it sloppy reporting or is there a hidden agenda? I can't see a motive -- there's little money to be made from the sale of flashing lights.

  4. #14
    I once worked at a place that had both a 700' and 1500' tower in back. No dead birds there. I think those numbers are total B.S.

    Keep in mind there are estimated to be between 200 and 400 billion birds in the world. Huge numbers fall victim to weather, disease, predators, etc. Any that might be killed by flying into a tower are a microscopically tiny number in comparison.

  5. #15
    At transmitter sites it is more often dead rodents who gain access and gnaw on power cables.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by wadio View Post
    But seriously, how does NPR justify this article? NPR is supposed to be the arbiter of all things correct. Is it sloppy reporting or is there a hidden agenda? I can't see a motive -- there's little money to be made from the sale of flashing lights.
    Good point. This is a classic example of "fake news".

    The idea that any more birds die at a tower site than on a comparably sized piece of grassland or woodland has been debunked by knowledgeable groups such as the SBE.

    There was also suggestion that the Gun Lake incident was wildly exaggerated and there appears to be little evidence that the deaths were caused by impact injuries as opposed to some natural cause related to disease or diet.

    There are many references on the Internet more recent than the alleged "Lake Gun Tower Deaths" relating incidents of mass deaths of fish-eating birds in Michigan due to a form of botulism caused by the fish.

    http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapi...n_100s_of.html

    If I could find many, many examples of similar incidents via a simple search, why couldn't NPR?

    Apparently the Gun Lake incident occurred 40 years ago.

    The article also states that towers can be as high as 1000 feet, when in fact the country is populated by a great number of towers up to 2000 feet in height. They also would seem to be pointing the finger at radio stations, rather than the many users of towers in the communications, cellular and other industries. So many poorly written and researched topic presented as facts.
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  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post

    If I could find many, many examples of similar incidents via a simple search, why couldn't NPR?
    Keep in mind that this is an example of a story that wasn't produced or reported by NPR, but rather by one of its member stations: WCMU at Central Michigan University. Not exactly subject to the same editorial process. Should there be fact checking when they pick up an affiliate story? Sure. But it begins with the affiliate, and this is often what happens when you take stories from outside sources. It's likely we'll see much more of this in lots of other places. We already do at Huffington Post, which is a news aggregator.
    Last edited by TheBigA; 01-25-2017 at 11:52 AM.

  8. #18
    This issue is more than just this particular story. About two years ago I attended a public meeting at FCC H.Q. where the advocates making these ridiculous claims, made them in front of Commissioners. Unfortunately, the FCC sat and listened politely, with no opportunity for rebuttal or common sense.

    Steve's comment about birds being blown up on utility poles is valid, but somehow I doubt these people would garner the same audience or interest, if suggesting the elimination of utility structures.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Kelly A View Post
    I doubt these people would garner the same audience or interest, if suggesting the elimination of utility structures.
    Not sure what you're saying. The FAA already requires the flashing lights on all new towers. That went into effect in 2015. The article doesn't say if that change was as a result of birds in Michigan. Existing towers are grandfathered. According to the article, the FCC is recommending the change for existing towers, but it's not required. The law applies to all towers where lights are used, including cellular towers. I don't see where the article calls for any other action. To me, it's just another cute and quirky story.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    To me, it's just another cute and quirky story.
    Seriously? Last I heard, "Morning Edition" is a NEWS program. Cute and quirky doesn't cut if the "facts" are wildly inaccurate.

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