Noise killing AM radio - Page 2
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Thread: Noise killing AM radio

  1. #11
    I don't see the article as disingenuous. It was an honest article about a man who experienced an interference free broadcast medium for a few hours, and admitted it as such.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Sparkplug View Post
    Sports fans. I grew up in Pennsylvania but now live in New England. The only way I can listen to "out of market" sporting events is by listening to clear channel stations in the evening.
    You can listen online. All, save for the NFL (and all games from this point forward are on Westwood One anyway), are either free or really cheap. TuneIn and the individual league apps/websites are your friends.
    We have to save the Earth! It's the only planet with football and beer.

  3. #13

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    The other night I was driving down a rural road 26 miles from a 50 kW 'blowtorch' and I punched it up for the news. Noise level was so high in the 'middle of nowhere' that I went to the FM translator.

    You can draw several conclusions from the above, most of which have been drawn in previous posts. Just a horrible example here.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by KeithE4 View Post
    You can listen online. All, save for the NFL (and all games from this point forward are on Westwood One anyway), are either free or really cheap. TuneIn and the individual league apps/websites are your friends.
    That's precisely what I do when I'm home. But when on the road I listen to the radio when propagation is good. Streaming via cell phone is just too expensive (and inconsistent).
    Last edited by Sparkplug; 01-12-2017 at 07:41 AM.

  5. #15

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    "which is the most efficient form of point to multi point communications ever created in the history of the world"

    Now that's what I call disingenuous.

    I love the AM radio, many auto makers put crap AM radios in cars, it's kinda sad. As for the usage of the band, if I plug my AM radio into the wall in my six year old house I only get the in town locals and static. If I use batteries it's much better, if I go outside it's even better. Maybe we could relocate the stations, or something, but still, that article is disingenuous at the least.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by brettbutlerisok View Post
    " Maybe we could relocate the stations, or something, but still, that article is disingenuous at the least.
    They should know that relocating AM stations so anyone get better indoor reception, ain't gonna happen. Medium Wave (AM) stations, require a lot of expensive land for ground and antenna systems.

    From a listener perspective, because of the increasing terrestrial noise levels even 50kW class A stations no longer "cover" 60% of their originally designed contours, especially at night. Keep in mind that 99% of the stations are still making their designed field strength, it's just that the noise floor overruns that signal at the receiver, especially when listening is indoors where building materials attenuate that signal. Add-in local noise from consumer product power supplies and lighting which represent a much higher signal level in the home than a station 20 miles away.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by KeithE4 View Post
    You can listen online. All, save for the NFL (and all games from this point forward are on Westwood One anyway), are either free or really cheap. TuneIn and the individual league apps/websites are your friends.
    TuneIn is rife with geo-fencing. I don't know how many times I've used it to listen to a station in another metro, and after hearing their commercial was greeted with the friendly "we're sorry, this stream is not available in your area" message. I don't even use it anymore.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by brettbutlerisok View Post
    "which is the most efficient form of point to multi point communications ever created in the history of the world"

    Now that's what I call disingenuous.

    I love the AM radio, many auto makers put crap AM radios in cars, it's kinda sad. As for the usage of the band, if I plug my AM radio into the wall in my six year old house I only get the in town locals and static. If I use batteries it's much better, if I go outside it's even better. Maybe we could relocate the stations, or something, but still, that article is disingenuous at the least.
    I plug in my radios into the wall I can hear out-of-town stations on most channels, save for a couple that have RFI from my router. If the radios are near my computer, the monitor puts out RFI on about 5-6 channels. The locals are clear. No static. On all my radios, including boomboxes.

    AM may not be the "most efficient", but FM has its issues also. Move the radio a few feet or angle the antenna wrong and you hit a silent spot. Drive around town and enjoy the picket fencing and terrain shadows. But it does usually sound clearer, that is true.

    The biggest deal with AM -- that the article hinted at -- is that it's more important in cases of major disasters.

    For example, when the Cascadia quake hits, local stations may still be on the air, or they may not be on the air for days or weeks. FEMA says everything west of I-5 will be "toast". That includes radio infrastructure. AM may be the only means of information available. It is the only regular broadcast media that crosses mountains and state lines.

    I can hear Portland and Vancouver AM stations every night, and some of them during the day. Some FM stations from just 30 miles away (in the same metro) don't come in well, unless the antenna is angled just right and the radio is in just the right corner of the room and you don't walk in front of the window.

    I think that was the guy's point. Perhaps his choice of words in that single sentence you picked out wasn't the best.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kelly A View Post
    They should know that relocating AM stations so anyone get better indoor reception, ain't gonna happen. Medium Wave (AM) stations, require a lot of expensive land for ground and antenna systems.
    Yeah, I was talking about on the band, like to an expanded FM band or digital or something. Certainly not moving the towers closer to peoples houses so they can hear them better.

    For example, when the Cascadia quake hits, local stations may still be on the air, or they may not be on the air for days or weeks. FEMA says everything west of I-5 will be "toast". That includes radio infrastructure. AM may be the only means of information available. It is the only regular broadcast media that crosses mountains and state lines.
    Yeah AM in California is nice that way, between KFBK, KSTE, KMJ, KFIG, KERN, KNZR the whole state is covered by 50,000 watt stations east of I-5. I wonder about LA and south, would KNZR do the job with all of the other stations down? Also how many people under 30 jeez maybe 40, know how to find these stations?

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by brettbutlerisok View Post

    Yeah AM in California is nice that way, between KFBK, KSTE, KMJ, KFIG, KERN, KNZR the whole state is covered by 50,000 watt stations east of I-5. I wonder about LA and south, would KNZR do the job with all of the other stations down? Also how many people under 30 jeez maybe 40, know how to find these stations?
    When the big one hits, one could make the safe assumption that probably even 50% of those stations will be knocked off line. Anyone using the argument justifying the existence of Class A AM stations for the purpose of long-distance broadcasting isn't thinking through why AM stations can't even be heard in large swaths of their designed coverage areas at night. Noise.

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