Why Isn't 95.7 Using The Jack Format? - Page 2
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Thread: Why Isn't 95.7 Using The Jack Format?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Gregg. View Post

    Licensing fees? I doubt it's much, considering CBS, I'm sure, is paying a flat rate for four stations. It shouldn't be that much more to add a fifth. And you get ready-made logos and other imaging material immediately. No need to think up new slogans or websites.
    Huh? We're talking about a major market. They don't need some company in Canada to create a logo, imaging, or slogan. You should ask yourself what does a company get by licensing Jack. A brand name? Big deal. A voice? Big deal. A music library? Big Deal. There's no benefit at all.

  2. #12
    Could've called it Sam-FM for Sam Houston.

  3. #13
    I am certainly glad that it fills your musical needs. I don't think we are that far apart musically based on your comments. When I said clunkers, I referred to songs that did not chart, or did not chart very high. Music fans in the era made their judgement - it does no good to challenge that by playing songs that never were popular. I could program a whole oldies format based on the "B" sides of 45's, it doesn't mean anybody would listen. They were "B" sides for a reason. A very few became hits, but that is another topic.

    You can't focus group a format like this. Your sample size is so small that you will get the weird niche favorites of the people in the room. I like some weird songs myself. That doesn't mean I would subject others to them. Jack, Bob, and Spot formats are good dial-across stations. Find a song you like, listen, maybe they play two or three you like, then something you never heard of before. Mostly awful. Tune out to another station, come back later. I did that with Bob FM last week on a Frys run when Cypress radio faded out. A good song, a bad song, I was gone. The Spot is little different. If they stuck to songs that were popular, they couldn't lose. But some track buried on a late 80's album put there to get the album up to 12 songs when the artist only had 11 good ones - its not radio worthy. It wasn't in the 80's, its not now. Spot does what it does, same as Bob or Jack. A welcome addition to Houston radio. My new set and forget favorite station? Not really.

  4. #14

    Join Date
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    128
    Quote Originally Posted by rbrucecarter5 View Post
    I am certainly glad that it fills your musical needs. I don't think we are that far apart musically based on your comments. When I said clunkers, I referred to songs that did not chart, or did not chart very high. Music fans in the era made their judgement - it does no good to challenge that by playing songs that never were popular. I could program a whole oldies format based on the "B" sides of 45's, it doesn't mean anybody would listen. They were "B" sides for a reason. A very few became hits, but that is another topic.

    You can't focus group a format like this. Your sample size is so small that you will get the weird niche favorites of the people in the room. I like some weird songs myself. That doesn't mean I would subject others to them. Jack, Bob, and Spot formats are good dial-across stations. Find a song you like, listen, maybe they play two or three you like, then something you never heard of before. Mostly awful. Tune out to another station, come back later. I did that with Bob FM last week on a Frys run when Cypress radio faded out. A good song, a bad song, I was gone. The Spot is little different. If they stuck to songs that were popular, they couldn't lose. But some track buried on a late 80's album put there to get the album up to 12 songs when the artist only had 11 good ones - its not radio worthy. It wasn't in the 80's, its not now. Spot does what it does, same as Bob or Jack. A welcome addition to Houston radio. My new set and forget favorite station? Not really.
    I've just looked at the last 8 hours of songs played and I only see one song (a real outlier, from Ryan Ferris from 2013 per Google) that I didn't immediately recognize. No B sides or deep album cuts that I can see. It looks to me like they're playing popular radio songs, albeit mostly 15+ years old.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by wildthangjim View Post
    It looks to me like they're playing popular radio songs, albeit mostly 15+ years old.
    Good idea. There's a reason why they're popular songs. Play what's popular.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by wildthangjim View Post
    I've just looked at the last 8 hours of songs played and I only see one song (a real outlier, from Ryan Ferris from 2013 per Google) that I didn't immediately recognize. No B sides or deep album cuts that I can see. It looks to me like they're playing popular radio songs, albeit mostly 15+ years old.
    Is it possible they are refining the format? Or are we getting something over the bird from LA, Nashville, NY?

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by rbrucecarter5 View Post
    Or are we getting something over the bird from LA, Nashville, NY?
    CBS Radio doesn't work that way.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by rbrucecarter5 View Post

    You can't focus group a format like this. Your sample size is so small that you will get the weird niche favorites of the people in the room. I like some weird songs myself. That doesn't mean I would subject others to them.
    Individual songs are not tested in a focus group.

    A focus group is generally around 10 people, and is done conversationally. Any music played is generally a montage of the hoods of a few songs (5 to 10 usually) as conversations starters, as in "how much would you listen to a station that played songs like that?" Focus groups test perceptions and trends, not specific songs.

    A music test will generally be in the 100 person range. Participants listen to hooks of anywhere from 400 to 600 songs in a session, and they score each one. Replication studies show that this sample size produces results that can be replicated very precisely. Only the consensus, broad appeal songs survive. Those that are polarizing don't.

    See http://www.americanradiohistory.com/...tion_based.htm for a description of the three major forms of internal radio programming research. To each, and the element of feeling that a good programmer gives a station... something that The Spot is displaying with a sound that is very consistent but varied within that consistency.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, RCA Broadcast News, Television Magazine, Radio Annual, Radio News, Sponsor, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, M Street Directory, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by rbrucecarter5 View Post
    Is it possible they are refining the format? Or are we getting something over the bird from LA, Nashville, NY?
    It is obviously a locally produced format with a locally tailored list.

    And all good stations are refining themselves constantly... most changes are subtle and the average listener does not notice, but are definitely fine tuning efforts going on.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, RCA Broadcast News, Television Magazine, Radio Annual, Radio News, Sponsor, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, M Street Directory, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    CBS Radio doesn't work that way.
    Yes, Sir! Even their small market station in Palm Springs (not even a top 100 market) is local, and live much of the day.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, RCA Broadcast News, Television Magazine, Radio Annual, Radio News, Sponsor, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, M Street Directory, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

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