Sam And Lissa FIRED - Page 2
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Sam And Lissa FIRED

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post
    It seems there are just tons of stories out there by former air talent (and engineers) about cheapskate owners. I can't recall that kind of assessment in any other industry. Must be a reason..
    The keyword here is "talent".

    Whether on the air or in programming, "talent" in radio tends to be ego-driven and we often believe that sales-driven management does not appreciate our skills and abilities. That ego factor is part of what makes a "personality" or a good PD, but it makes it very likely that the perception of being under-paid quite vivid.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, RCA Broadcast News, Television Magazine, Radio Annual, Radio News, Sponsor, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, M Street Directory, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post

    It seems there are just tons of stories out there by former air talent (and engineers) about cheapskate owners. I can't recall that kind of assessment in any other industry. Must be a reason.
    You must have a short memory. Consider the debate we've had in this country about raising the minimum wage. That's not a radio issue, but covers most menial work. Consider the very public battle WalMart had with its employees about full and part time employees, and the benefits they receive. Consider all of the labor strikes we've had over the past 100 years, in the auto, coal, and steel industries. Certainly one of the reason so many jobs have been outsourced to other countries. In all cases, the "enemy" has been "cheapskate owners."

    On the radio side, talent gets paid very well, especially talent that is directly associated with revenue, like talk show hosts, morning teams, and syndicated talent. They all get paid very well, and for the most part, have a pretty good association with management.
    Last edited by TheBigA; 12-18-2016 at 03:34 PM.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    You must have a short memory. Consider the debate we've had in this country about raising the minimum wage. That's not a radio issue, but covers most menial work. Consider the very public battle WalMart had with its employees about full and part time employees, and the benefits they receive. Consider all of the labor strikes we've had over the past 100 years, in the auto, coal, and steel industries. Certainly one of the reason so many jobs have been outsourced to other countries. In all cases, the "enemy" has been "cheapskate owners."
    In most cases pay scales are directly related to the abundance, or lack, of desired skills. People who produce valuable revenue tend to be much better paid than those that have skills that are more common. Automation in certain industries like coal and auto assembly have greatly reduced the number of people jobs but increased the number of skilled jobs making those machines and associated software. We don't tend to hear about those. Retailing has always been a relatively low paying job whether you are selling clothes or hamburgers. Those conditions have nothing to do with cheapskate owners but profits do. As you already know there are multiple ways to increase profits (or returns) to stockholders and paying the help is one way. The companies who truly value their employees and pay at least the going wage will have better results retaining talent/skill than those that try to get by on the cheap.

    My old company, Intel, was an excellent example of what I am talking about. In many employee benefit meetings they stressed their goal was to be in the middle group of companies paying salaries and benefits although in the highest group when it came to productivity and revenue. Because they sold a relatively rare product and had massive market share it was doable for many years. As soon as their products became commodities that business model failed and as a result they suffer employee turnover and dissatisfaction today. And, if you will note, their stock price hasn't moved in almost 20 years. They are essentially a utility attracting stockholders by paying good dividends instead of stock appreciation.

    Radio isn't much different except that air talent is their only important product. They obviously need sales and management to keep the business alive but if their on-air talent doesn't attract and keep listeners everything else won't matter. That, to me, is why voice tracking and syndicated shows are so distasteful. Radio was for so long live and local and that business model has largely been broken except for AMD. The exceptional talent is relegated to big markets that can afford them or gone on to vanilla voice tracking gigs where they can earn a better income.
    Last edited by landtuna; 12-18-2016 at 05:19 PM.
    Illegitimi non carborundum

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post

    Radio was for so long live and local and that business model has largely been broken except for AMD. The exceptional talent is relegated to big markets that can afford them or gone on to vanilla voice tracking gigs where they can earn a better income.

    That's a rather simplistic view of a very complicated issue. Talent is a function of format and market. The format you like is very talent oriented. But there are other formats that aren't. Listeners demand less talk and more music. For them, VT is perfectly acceptable. I find it ironic that the company that some call "cheap channel" pays multi-million dollar salaries to top talent, including Rush, Ryan, Sean, and Elvis. These are people who have been offered other jobs from other companies, and have chosen to remain where they are for a long time. I read where Cumulus, also a company that some call cheap, gave all their employees a 3% raise this year. That's not including what their contract employees got, which is likely more.

    Conversely, there are stations where they don't have a lot of local talent. That's not a new thing. There were automated radio stations in the 1960s. I saw somewhere that over 1/3 of all radio had no local talent in the 60s. And quite often they weren't necessarily low rated stations. Once again, we're talking about formats where automation makes sense. I can give you lists of small market stations (those under market #100) that have local staffs. So it's not a small market thing at all. There are stations in Flagstaff AZ and Reno NV that have local talent. Even smaller places than that. So to generalize and lump all of radio as one thing is wrong.
    Last edited by TheBigA; 12-18-2016 at 06:58 PM.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by landtuna View Post
    Radio isn't much different except that air talent is their only important product.
    No. "Entertainment" or "content" is the product. With music stations, the most important ingredient is the music mix, blend and flow. The personalities are the glue that holds it together, and only attract audience if the music itself is on target. Other ingredients include the staging and imaging of the station, promotions and contests and today, new media supplements and streaming options.

    A Disk Jockey with out the right disks will fail. The right music, but with poor flow and rotation, will fail. A station that is not "together" in overall sound will fail. The Program Director is generally the biggest star of all, even though the audience often does not know who they are unless they have an airshift.
    www.americanradiohistory.com
    Broadcasting Magazine and Yearbooks, RCA Broadcast News, Television Magazine, Radio Annual, Radio News, Sponsor, Television/Radio Age, R&R, Duncan's American Radio, M Street Directory, Broadcast Engineering, db, and more.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    S. CA
    Posts
    156
    I was fired once while on vacation. When I returned from vacation I was met by the security guard who directed me to a cardboard box containing my personal possessions. Sometimes life sucks.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by TeaPartyDude View Post
    I was fired once while on vacation. When I returned from vacation I was met by the security guard who directed me to a cardboard box containing my personal possessions. Sometimes life sucks.
    This should be unacceptable in any business. Any firing manager worth his salt should have met face to face with the employee and explained what was to happen and why. They could then be escorted out of the building securely but maintaining the employee's dignity. Unless the firing was the result of a moral letdown or legal issue there is no reason whatsoever to treat any employee this way. And yes, firing people is part, and a distasteful part, of management. But it can work both ways.

    Back in the early 70's I worked for a company that had a nasty reputation for blowing people out the door if they heard you were looking, or had accepted, another job. So I took what was my final vacation and removed all my personal effects slowly over time then submitted my resignation via letter while on vacation. The nasty manager asked that I come in for an exit interview after my termination date, which I did. In that meeting he asked me why I had resigned the way I did so I told him his employees could not trust him. He was less than happy with me but I heard later that he had changed his ways ever so slightly.

    Over my long career I was fired only once and that coming after I had told my manager in confidence I would be moving to another company. I was trying to give him, and the company, time to assign my replacement and me to finish up work that couldn't realistically be assumed by one of my peers. That wasn't important to the boss as I apparently had damaged his ego and he wanted me gone. Years later I ran into a similar situation but this time with a much more professional boss. We parted on good terms and about six months later he rehired me with some new job opportunities. I gladly went back to work for him because I knew we had a great working relationship and I could trust him.
    Illegitimi non carborundum

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Hayward, California, United States
    Posts
    450
    I didn't see this coming, but according to KBAY's Facebook page, they plan to re-brand as 94-5 Bay-FM and asked listeners to tune in Christmas night at 5pm for "One Last Present from KBAY" Could this mean that the station will go into stunt mode at that time? HMMMM!
    WASSUP YA ALL!!!! IT'S THE WORLD'S MOST LOVEABLE AUTISTIC HAMMERIN' HANK.  I WORKED AT KYLD(WiLD 94.9) IN SAN FRANCISCO FOR OVER FOURTEEN YEARS UNTIL I WAS LET GO IN AUGUST 2008. I'M CURRENTLY LOOKING FOR MY NEXT RADIO JOB, BUT TIMES ARE TOUGH THESE DAYS!!!!

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    377
    Some other site (which shall remain nameless and not linked to), reports that the new format will be Classic Hits.

  10. #20
    Renel for mornings?? Maybe Greg Kihn??

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  




     
Our Conferences
Useful Contacts
Community


Contact Us