You want The Truth? You can't handle The Truth! - Page 2
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Thread: You want The Truth? You can't handle The Truth!

  1. #11
    That's exactly right, they cannot.

  2. #12
    I'm sure that cost of having equipment on Capitol Hill outweighed the benefit of greater coverage. It makes sense to me run their non-commercial student station right out of the facility on Mercer Island.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by bobdavcav View Post
    What a way to tie the two current active threads together! Love it! Not gonna happen though, that's way too far north for KMIH to want it. I would, however, like to see the local high school in Darrington get that thing though. As for KMIH and the lp, how exactly could they run the same liners and everything without being a simulcast?
    They could run one on a delay. Even a 2 minute delay would be good enough.

  4. #14

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    It would give Darrington High students something to do...other than outdoor activities.
    734 AM's in the log, 537 FMs (250 from Western WA), That's a DXer!
    FM, AM and SW DXer of Yakima, WA! God Bless America!
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  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by crainbebo View Post
    It would give Darrington High students something to do...other than outdoor activities.
    Someone would have to pay for it...since it's non-commercial. Extra charge on property taxes?

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Someone would have to pay for it...since it's non-commercial. Extra charge on property taxes?
    Doubtful...it would have to be a borderline cost-neutral operation for a public school (high school or college) to take it over. KMIH does as well as it does because it is in a very wealthy school district and has a huge alumni base that wants to see it survive...I rarely hear students on there these days.

    Even in a state where the citizenry are OK with tax increases like WA, purchasing a radio station would seem to be superfluous. It would have to be donated and cost the school system less than a couple grand/year to operate out of their budget. So, be prepared to also set up a booster club to finance the joint, even if the physical plant and license are donated!

    Ditto, KGRG/KGRG1. There is almost nobody on-air there, save for the AM drive-time on KGRG. The promos for their radio classes (which get updated once per academic year, it seems) even promote the ability to learn podcasting along with broadcast skills...

    Heck, even the college station I cut my teeth on 16 years ago (when it doesn't simulcast a distant NPR station) has a LOT of automation and only a few live souls on the air these days. 16 years ago, we were live 12-16 hours/day with the rest being NPR simulcasting.

    Kids these days are more interested in podcasts, YouTube channels, etc. Only time I see anybody under 25 physically use the radio is when their parents donate them a car without an aux jack or when their data plan on their Android phone is nearing its limit, and they're not by wifi.

    I am sure I will catch hell for this statement, but radio as a career for kids/young adults is a tough sell. Getting the same folks motivated enough to come to a regularly-scheduled air shift is an even tougher sell.

    Yes, there is streaming which keeps the young'uns kinda interested in some of the specialty stations or a favorite station from a place they lived/visited (KEXP as a prime example), but even I find myself using less TuneIn Radio on my phone and more Amazon Prime Music, SXM, Pandora, etc. And I not only work a bit in the broadcast industry, but I'm sadly moving right into the "sweet spot" for radio advertisers!

    Radio-X
    Proud to still be the least important paid worker in the Seattle/Tacoma media industry!

    Not for use in MD, CT, NY, Cook County IL, HI, UT, PR, and where otherwise prohibited by law

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Radio-X View Post

    I am sure I will catch hell for this statement, but radio as a career for kids/young adults is a tough sell. Getting the same folks motivated enough to come to a regularly-scheduled air shift is an even tougher sell.
    Very sad (but probably truthful) point. I'm a 21 year old wannabe host, and you can sure bet on the fact that I would be more than motivated to be there for a regularly scheduled air shift. The problem seems to stem from the fact that it's hard to get anyone to give you much of a chance. Luckily for me, I was eventually given the opportunity to try my hand behind the board, and with that opportunity gained some highly valuable experience. I'm sure the experts will be the first to tell you how difficult it is to get into radio as a young person these days. It's a shame that many organizations (like Bates Technical College) don't even teach these skills anymore to those who are even interested in learning. Maybe it will turn in my favor if the millennial generation becomes too lazy to bother taking on air jobs in favor of trying to build their YouTube "gaming" channels.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Radio-X View Post

    I am sure I will catch hell for this statement, but radio as a career for kids/young adults is a tough sell.
    Of course it's a tough sell. Truthfully, it's always been a tough sell. More glamour in TV. Always has been. Some kids know they can make more with YouTube videos than they'll ever make with radio. So yes, it's a tough sell.

    But still, there are many times more applicants than there are jobs available. You look at the web sites, and the DJs are in their 50s. Entire generations of young people have been turned away from radio jobs because the boomers still want to play radio until they kick the bucket.

    Let me ask, though, how many kids do you think are running out and getting jobs at Spotify or Pandora? What kind of career can they expect there? Take a look at the jobs there, and the main ones are either in engineering or sales.
    Last edited by TheBigA; 11-29-2016 at 01:21 AM.

  9. #19

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    Assuming radio as we know it will be around in 10-20 years (I'm not doubting that it will be still there), you'll begin to see more positions open up. That is assuming the major companies running these stations decide to keep human beings in any on-air positions.

    I saw an article recently that Jack in the Box is looking at completely automating their food production and cashiering in a restaurant. There will be one person there to make sure things don't go awry and to provide janitorial/basic security services (a robot can't tell folks using drugs in the bathroom to leave...unless you want a Robo-Cop scenario), but everything else will be automated and computerized.

    Now, fast forward 10-20 years. Once the current slate of folks have retired out or are put 'on the beach', with advances in text-to-speech and artificial intelligence, it is entirely possible an entire 4-5 station cluster with a full 24/7 slate of on-air "hosts" will be run entirely by one person in programming, possibly a receptionist, and the normal contingent of sales staff. The "human" aspect of radio may be mostly eliminated!

    Radio-X
    Proud to still be the least important paid worker in the Seattle/Tacoma media industry!

    Not for use in MD, CT, NY, Cook County IL, HI, UT, PR, and where otherwise prohibited by law

  10. #20
    I wonder what we are all supposed to do when computers can do every single job currently being done.

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