Someone pitching the idea to sell radio to 65+ demo - Page 2
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Thread: Someone pitching the idea to sell radio to 65+ demo

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar Madison View Post
    This is probably the most prejudiced comment I've seen on a message board. Much as I dislike PC terms, the best word to describe it is "ageism."
    You can call it whatever you want. The courts have ruled that this is business, not discrimination.

    Once again, I'm not saying there isn't money in targeting seniors. There is. The problem is advertisers are using other forms of media to reach them.

    If that's a problem, complain to the advertisers. Tell them radio would love their business.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oscar Madison View Post
    This is probably the most prejudiced comment I've seen on a message board. Much as I dislike PC terms, the best word to describe it is "ageism."
    No, this is an issue of pragmatism, not ageism. Transactional radio buyers essentially buy no radio against 55+, so there is no money there for stations that program to the demo.

    Where a few stations prosper despite having a very old audience is among heritage AM news and talkers that are traditional market buys. Examples are WLW and WBEN. But there is no equal prosperity rule; stations like WGN are off by a third to half in revenue over the last decade.

    The reason why advertisers don't buy 55+ is that their extensive internal research shows that older consumers do not provide the necessary ROI for successful ad buys.

    And most can recall when the NAB did not allow more than three spots in a row, or more than 18 minutes of commercial time.
    The NAB code did not specify stopset length. It did stop at 18 minutes of spots per hour, but so did the FCC renewal process at the time.

    I ran stopsets of 5 to 6 spots four times an hour in the 70's and on license renewal stated "NAB code except as applies to liquor advertising" because in my market hard liquor advertising was a standard practice on radio and TV. But we kept to every other provision of the code, and in fact limited ourselves to 10 minutes of spots an hour. Of course, the NAB dropped the code when it was determined to be anti-competitive and de facto collusion.

    I call the attention of the anti-Boomer crowd here to Zoomer Radio in Toronto (and its associated media properties) which make a healthy business out of targeting active seniors.
    They survive, but there have been quite a number of occasions when the operation was reported to be in financial crisis state. And the station has had to make considerable adjustment to lower the average age. Still, they are only minimally viable... in a different country.

    There are dozens of cable channels and HD sub-channels targeting seniors and apparently doing well at it. It's radio that is hobbled by prejudice being passed off as expertise.
    Most of the senior-targeted advertising on TV is there... or in the AARP magazine... because the client feels they need the visual "appetite appeal" that TV or print gives. Riverboat cruises or stair lifts or lifestyle enhancing medications sell the look and appeal of the product or service.

    In any case, the issue is not with radio. It is with the advertisers who direct their agency to buy specific ad targets. And as I said, there is essentially no money against 55+ to be had in radio.

    Several years ago, CBS TV, which has become the oldest network in terms of average viewer age, wanted to do something about the network and major cable buying that specified 18-49 or some subset. They went to the agencies and their clients to push including 50-64 in the buy specs. After about three years, they keep trying but there are no major success stories and CBS cancels shows that deliver a predominance of 50+ viewers.
    Last edited by DavidEduardo; 09-12-2016 at 08:33 PM.
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  3. #13

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    That's been my point forever. Playing the music of my youth, reminding me of when my biggest problem was zits, peppered by stopsets with ads reminding me I'm older and my parts don't work as well as they used to, and if I tried to "Dance To The Music" my knees would hurt. Mmmmm, no.



    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    He talks about commercials as being part of programming. He's right, and that's why some advertisers aiming for that demo create program-length commercials aka infomercials. They want their messages to stand out, and in the context of typical music programming, such as oldies or classic hits, their :30 messages simply become part of the stop-set. That's why that kind of programming isn't the right environment for the messages he's talking about. The right environment is talk programming. That's where those messages will fit with the environment. That's why talk radio programming can make more money for radio than oldies.

    Imagine listening to an oldies radio station, and hearing all those great songs from your youth. All of a sudden the music stops, and commercials come on talking about funeral homes and drugs for prostate health. Talk about a rude awakening. Does that get you in the mood for buying something? Probably not.

    But the real issue here, and Holland doesn't address it at all, is that the demo he's talking about HATES commercials. They HATE being sold products. When the phone rings and it's a sales pitch, they hang up. When the music stops and commercials start, they turn off the radio. They're not influenced by advertising. They prefer self-discovery. They prefer word of mouth. They prefer to have people they trust share information with them. That process works better in talk radio than it does in music radio. And the TIME it takes to deliver that message works better in talk radio.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post


    Several years ago, CBS TV, which has become the oldest network in terms of average viewer age, wanted to do something about the network and major cable buying that specified 18-49 or some subset. They went to the agencies and their clients to push including 50-64 in the buy specs. After about three years, they keep trying but there are no major success stories and CBS cancels shows that deliver a predominance of 50+ viewers.
    Except for "60 Minutes," and just about all the ads on that show target 65-to-dead.Do those advertisers pay a premium for the network's one consistent winner, or does "60 Minutes" billing still underperform more youth-oriented CBS fare?

  5. #15

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    It's not a matter of being "gullible". If I need furniture, the ad for the furniture sale might catch my attention. If I'm not, I ignore it. A 30 year old is more likely to be buying furniture than a 60 year old.


    Quote Originally Posted by CTListener View Post
    Exactly. Time and experience have shown the older listener that the advertiser is often exaggerating, sometimes to the brink of lying. Fortunately, there are always younger, more gullible listeners available and they are always Madison Avenue's prime target. When today's CHR listener is 60 and listening to Taylor and Arianna on his/her storage device and wondering why he can't hear their music on radio anymore instead of whatever "garbage" the current 18-34 crowd is listening to, Big A Jr. or David Eduardo Jr. will probably be there to tell him/her why. And he/she won't believe it and argue that the radio suits are wrong. And FrankBerry Jr. will close the thread, citing circular argument ...

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by gr8oldies View Post
    A 30 year old is more likely to be buying furniture than a 60 year old.
    Very true...I go to estate sales, and just about all the furniture I see was bought 40 or more years ago. Nothing new. It's all considered "antique," which is often the attraction these days.

  7. #17

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    It could also be instructive to listen to some of those old 60s and 70s airchecks and check out what was being advertised to our younger selves and our older siblings.


    Quote Originally Posted by TheBigA View Post
    Very true...I go to estate sales, and just about all the furniture I see was bought 40 or more years ago. Nothing new. It's all considered "antique," which is often the attraction these days.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by CTListener View Post
    Except for "60 Minutes," and just about all the ads on that show target 65-to-dead.Do those advertisers pay a premium for the network's one consistent winner, or does "60 Minutes" billing still underperform more youth-oriented CBS fare?
    There are plenty of TV advertisers with products primarily directed at over-50 viewers. So they pick the shows that deliver them best. You won't see them on the shows on CW, because they would be paying for a lot of audience they don't want.

    But those advertisers don't buy the CBS shows that skew younger, either.

    Think of the Viagra and Cialis ads. They do not talk about erections. They talk about romantic moments and paint visual pictures of contented intimacy, something hard to do with words alone. Or how about the drug for stronger bones and joints that shows people getting up off the porch and walking with the playful dog down the beach. Try doing that with words alone.

    And before a comment of "copy used to be better" is posted, products that sold based on visual appeal ranging from many food products to cleaning products to apparel have never used radio unless as frequency building support for TV ads.

    CBS is the consistent ratings winner in TV. NBC, ABC and FOX have all been beaten in the last season by Univision... but not CBS.
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  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by davideduardo View Post


    and before a comment of "copy used to be better" is posted, products that sold based on visual appeal ranging from many food products to cleaning products to apparel have never used radio unless as frequency building support for tv ads.

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  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidEduardo View Post

    Think of the Viagra and Cialis ads. They do not talk about erections.
    Except in the legal at the end, where they talk about "erections lasting more than 5 hours." That's not the kind of ad you want to see with your young daughter in the room. Definitely don't want to hear that on the radio on my way to church Sunday morning. Or after they play "high on the mountain of love."
    Last edited by TheBigA; 09-12-2016 at 11:22 PM.

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